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Climate Watch

Electricity supply in South Africa: Path dependency or decarbonisation?

<p>Renewable energy technologies have experienced an exponential growth in South Africa, thanks to the procurement of large-scale power plants. However, South Africa’s electricity sector still lacks a level playing field. Significant vested interests have maintained overwhelming support for centralised, coal-based electricity generation, preventing the development of renewable energy technologies to their optimal potential. Active efforts are required to enhance the transformation of electricity supply in the country by truly incorporating the low-carbon transition in electricity planning, opening the policy space for the development of embedded generation, and phasing out fossil fuel subsidies.</p><p>The electricity sector in South Africa is a highly contested space. The emergence of renewable energy technologies (along with energy efficiency and other demand-side management opportunities) has generated healthy revitalisation and disturbance of the status quo in the industry. Discussions around other technologies, such as gas-to-power and nuclear energy, are also adding to this vibrant dynamics. Significant vested interests are still at play alongside massive state support to maintain the domination of the coal industry over the electricity supply industry in South Africa. <br /><br />Active efforts are required to provide a level playing field for all energy technologies and enhance the transformation of electricity supply in the country. This includes truly incorporating the low-carbon transition in electricity planning, open the policy space for the development of embedded generation and phase out fossil fuel subsidies.</p>

14 Mar 2017 02:06:58 GMT

Innovative risk finance solutions – Insights for geothermal power development in Kenya and Ethiopia

<p>Geothermal development is on the rise in many regions of the world.&nbsp;However, the high costs of field development, coupled with the high risks associated with resource exploration and drilling, still pose a significant barrier to private sector financing.</p><p>Insurance can mitigate the risks to investors&nbsp;and increase flows of private finance to the industry.</p><p>A project by Parhelion, a private sector insurance and risk company focused on climate finance, funded by CDKN, aimed to improve the technical capacity of Kenya’s and Ethiopia’s local insurance industries for using geothermal risk mitigation instruments.</p><p>A consultative process with relevant stakeholders in these countries yielded insights and recommendations for international, multilateral and bilateral institutions that are looking to support geothermal resource development. The analysis was enriched by E3G’s expertise in analysing climate finance flows.</p><p>The study found that international, multilateral and bilateral institutions should:</p><ul><li><strong>Support technical assistance and capacity building</strong>, which takes into account the needs of all relevant stakeholders involved within specific country and market contexts.</li></ul><ul><li><strong>Provide targeted concessional finance&nbsp;</strong>by taking into account all possible risk mitigation instruments during project development, and by envisioning the leverage of private finance as early as possible.</li></ul><ul><li>U<strong>se insurance&nbsp;</strong><strong>instruments</strong>&nbsp;to target specific, well defined risks: this can offer very high leverage ratios on the use of public funds, and crowd in private sector insurance capital.</li></ul>

02 Mar 2017 01:44:39 GMT

Climate impacts on agriculture and tourism – the case for climate resilient investment in the Caribbean

<p>For the Caribbean, climate change is not tomorrow’s problem. The threats it poses are neither distant nor abstract – they are already apparent. In recent years, hurricanes have caused major damage in countries such as Jamaica, Grenada and Cuba; severe flooding has hit Belize and Guyana; and droughts affect much of the east of the region. The small island state of Saint Lucia alone has faced 27 natural disasters between 1980 and 2008, with total economic damage reaching an estimated US$2.5 billion. The need for investment to build climate resilience in the Caribbean has never been greater.</p><p>These impacts are putting considerable strain on the finances of national governments, businesses and citizens, and threaten regional prosperity and development. The Commonwealth Expert Group on Climate Finance has said that climate change is already reversing some of the gains on poverty alleviation and economic growth that have been made in the Caribbean.</p><p>Over the past decade, research funded by the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) has provided fresh insight into the nature of the climate threat to the Caribbean. Researchers have developed regionally downscaled climate change projections and climate visualisation tools providing information that can be used to make informed decisions at the subregional level. This information has been used in conjunction with a range of other tools, and has been applied to real-life situations in Caribbean nations including Saint Lucia, Jamaica, Barbados, Belize and Cuba.</p><p>Focusing on the agriculture and tourism sectors, this document identifies some of the most pressing issues and climate vulnerabilities facing Caribbean states. It makes the case that climate resilience investment by governments, businesses and development partners is urgently needed to</p><p><strong>Key messages</strong></p><ul><li>&nbsp;Climate variability and change are already having severe impacts on key sectors including agriculture and tourism.</li><li>These impacts are reversing economic growth, exacerbating poverty and undermining the future prosperity of Caribbean countries.</li><li>CDKN research has provided locally appropriate climate change projections that give fresh insight into the vulnerability of key sectors.</li><li>Adaptation investment in the agriculture sector is needed to account for projected changes in rainfall and growing seasons, and occurrence of extreme events, especially drought.</li><li>Adaptation investment in the tourism sector is also needed to build resilience to rising seas, bleached coral reefs, water scarcity and gradual temperature increase.</li><li>There are many potential adaptation measures that can be applied by governments, businesses, individuals and development partners.</li><li>Financial support is needed to support adaptation action as high up-front costs are a barrier to local adaptation efforts.</li><li>Effectively prioritising adaptation options can maximise their value and lead to positive co-benefits for individuals, businesses and society.</li></ul>

28 Feb 2017 05:42:54 GMT

Driving, connecting and communicating: The many roles of national government in climate adaptation planning

<p>Climate change is one of the most significant challenges to the Caribbean’s future prosperity. The impacts of climate change on economically important sectors such as tourism, agriculture and fishing threaten Caribbean nations’ ability to achieve their economic and social development goals. By 2050, the costs to the region are expected to reach US$22 bn each year; this represents 10% of regional gross domestic product, based on 2004 figures.&nbsp;Paying for recovery efforts after natural disasters causes significant budgetary pressures and diverts funds from other pressing development issues such as health and education. However, responding to climate challenges is highly complex. Climate change has cross-cutting impacts that span sectors and spatial scales, and involves multiple stakeholders. Delivering effective climate change adaptation is therefore a question of governance.</p><p>Bottom-up, community-level approaches are important in meeting the challenges that climate change poses, but in isolation they are insufficient. National governance frameworks must foster community action, but also provide the enabling environment for large investments and transformative change at scale. The challenge that national governments face is to coordinate adaptation interventions at both national and local levels by engaging multiple organisations and individuals.</p><p>Targeted primarily at Caribbean policy-makers, this&nbsp;<em>Information Brief&nbsp;</em>draws on the experience of three CDKN-funded projects that have taken place in the region over the last decade. It identifies ‘best practice’ lessons on governance, highlights examples from applied case studies in Caribbean countries, and recommends tools and methods that can be applied to make governance frameworks more effective at delivering climate compatible development. It is also a gateway to the reports and tools that have been produced under these CDKN-funded projects.</p><p><strong>Key messages</strong></p><ul><li>Policy and governance arrangements at the national level are vital for climate adaptation. Local action is im&shy;portant but is insufficient in isolation.</li><li>National governments provide stra&shy;tegic oversight and access to climate finance, and have the capacity and authority to drive climate action.</li><li>Climate change considerations should be integrated into policies and plans across government departments. The CCORAL tool allows decision-makers to do this.</li><li>Institutional arrangements are vital to help translate government policy into action. Governments can use the ARIA toolkit to assess their institutional adaptive capacity as a first step to strengthening these frameworks.</li><li>Government institutions are vital in stimulating action at the local level. Networked governance arrangements can help to build movements for cli&shy;mate resilience that translate national priorities into local action and inte&shy;grate local needs into national policy.</li></ul>

28 Feb 2017 05:15:12 GMT

Africa’s climate: helping decision-makers make sense of climate information

<div>African decision-makers need reliable, accessible, and trustworthy information about the continent’s climate, and how this climate might change in future, if they are to plan appropriately to meet the region’s development challenges.</div><div><br />This report is designed as a guide for scientists, policy-makers, and practitioners on the continent. The research in this report, written by leading experts in their fields, presents an overview of climate trends across central, eastern, western, and southern Africa, and is distilled into a series of factsheets that are tailored for specific sub-regions and countries. Some of these capture the current state of knowledge, while others explore the ‘burning scientific questions’ that still need to be answered.</div>

24 Feb 2017 01:53:41 GMT

Zombie energy: climate benefits of ending subsidies to fossil fuel production

<div>Ending subsidies to fossil fuel production is often a missing piece of comprehensive climate action plans. To implement the 2015 Paris Agreement and keep climate change well below 2oC, the world needs both supply-side policies (such as removal of fossil fuel production subsidies, moratoriums and “no-go zones” or coal phase-out) and demand-side policies (such as carbon pricing, removal of fossil fuel consumption subsidies, or fuel and energy efficiency standards).</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>This report sheds light on the potential climate benefits of the removal of fossil fuel production subsidies in terms of both greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions and the oil, gas and coal reserves that could become uneconomical to produce. The paper explains how different production subsidies currently unlock “zombie energy” from fossil fuel deposits that would not be commercially viable to produce without government support. It also presents new modelling of the global removal of certain subsidies to fossil fuel production.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The report is structured as follows:</div><div><ul><li>chapter 1 explains why fossil fuel production subsidies matter for climate change. The chapter also defines and categorises fossil fuel production subsidies</li><li>chapter 2 outlines how different subsidies influence investment decisions related to fossil fuel production</li><li>chapter 3 discusses modelling of a removal of fossil fuel production subsidies and inputs of the GSI-IF (p) global model</li><li>chapter 4 presents results of new modelling that shows how much coal, oil and gas could become uneconomical to produce—and the GHG emission reductions that would result—if certain fossil fuel production subsidies are removed globally</li></ul></div><div>The report concludes with a summary of the findings as well as opportunities for further research on the climate benefits of fossil fuel subsidy removal.</div></div>

24 Feb 2017 01:33:43 GMT

National climate change governance: topic guide

<div>The full brunt of cumulative greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will be felt over the years to come but climate change impacts are already here. Fifteen of the 16 warmest years on record (since 1880) have occurred since 2001. At the same time, Hallegatte et al. (2016) estimate that, without the rapid implementation of pro-poor, climate-informed development policies, climate change impacts could result in 100 million more people in extreme poverty by 2030. The world’s poor are more vulnerable to loss of critical assets, health risks and food insecurity from drought or price shocks. To address these risks, development policies must consider climate risk scenarios while expanding ‘no-regrets’ social protection programmes that provide benefits to vulnerable populations under different climate scenarios.</div><div><br />This Topic Guide looks at climate change governance and the political economy of climate policy development and implementation at the national scale. Its primary purpose is to help Department for International Development (DFID) staff better support country partners in implementing climate and sustainable development policy that is equitable, effective and coherent and that can adapt to changing circumstances. It highlights national procedural, policy, institutional, political, economicand social-behavioural challenges and identifies potential entry points for addressing them. It is intended for both climate change and governance advisors, hence covers issues and concepts that will be very familiar to one group but not necessarily the other.</div>

24 Feb 2017 01:24:14 GMT

Driving, connecting and communicating: the many roles of national government in climate adaptation planning

<div>Climate change is one of the most significant challenges to the Caribbean’s future prosperity. The impacts of climate change on economically important sectors such as tourism, agriculture and fishing threaten Caribbean nations’ ability to achieve their economic and social development goals. By 2050, the costs to the region are expected to reach US$22 bn each year; this represents 10% of regional gross domestic product, based on 2004 figures.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Paying for recovery efforts after natural disasters causes significant budgetary&nbsp; pressures and diverts funds from other pressing development issues such as health and&nbsp; education. However, responding to climate challenges is highly complex. Climate change has cross-cutting impacts that span sectors and spatial scales, and involves multiple stakeholders. Delivering effective climate change adaptation is therefore a question of governance.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Key messages:</div><div><ul><li><div>policy and governance arrangements at the national level are vital for climate adaptation. Local action is important but is insufficient in isolation</div></li><li><div>national governments provide strategic oversight and access to climate finance, and have the capacity and authority to drive climate action</div></li><li><div>climate change considerations should be integrated into policies and plans across government departments. The CCORAL tool allows decision-makers to do this</div></li><li><div>iInstitutional arrangements are vital to help translate government policy into action. Governments can use the ARIA toolkit to assess their institutional adaptive capacity as a first step to strengthening these frameworks</div></li><li><div>government institutions are vital in stimulating action at the local level. Networked governance arrangements can help to build movements for climate resilience that translate national priorities into local action and integrate local needs into national policy</div></li></ul></div>

21 Feb 2017 04:40:13 GMT

Climate impacts on agriculture and tourism: the case for climate resilient investment in the Caribbean

<div>For the Caribbean, climate change is not tomorrow’s problem. The threats it poses are neither distant nor abstract – they are already apparent. In recent years, hurricanes have caused major damage in countries such as Jamaica, Grenada and Cuba; severe flooding has hit Belize and Guyana; and droughts affect much of the east of the region.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The small island state of Saint Lucia alone has faced 27 natural disasters between 1980 and 2008, with total economic damage&nbsp; reaching an estimated US$2.5 billion. The need for investment to build climate resilience in the Caribbean has never been greater.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Key messages:<br /><div><ul><li>climate variability and change are already having severe impacts on key sectors including agriculture and tourism</li><li>these impacts are reversing economic growth, exacerbating poverty and undermining the future prosperity of Caribbean countries</li><li>CDKN research has provided locally appropriate climate change projections that give fresh insight into the vulnerability of key sectors</li><li><div>adaptation investment in the agriculture sector is needed to account for projected changes in rainfall and growing seasons, and</div><div>occurrence of extreme events, especially drought</div></li><li><div>adaptation investment in the tourism sector is also needed to build resilience to rising seas, bleached coral reefs, water scarcity and gradual temperature increase</div></li><li><div>there are many potential adaptation measures that can be applied by governments, businesses, individuals and development</div><div>partners</div></li><li><div>financial support is needed to support adaptation action as high up-front costs are a barrier to local adaptation efforts</div></li><li><div>effectively prioritising adaptation options can maximise their value and lead to positive co-benefits for individuals, businesses and society</div></li></ul></div></div>

21 Feb 2017 04:30:44 GMT

The Future of rice security under climate change

<div>Food systems are climate and weather dependent; heat stress and changes in rainfall patterns and relative humidity are likely to regulate crop yields. Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) are likely to directly and indirectly bring new challenges to the stability and sustainability of global food production including rice.</div><div><br />This report provides a brief overview of projected rice security indicated by future potential yield under elevated carbon dioxide levels. This research aims to identify the downscaled impact of climate change on rice production which includes climate change impact assessment at sub-national levels in the world’s top three rice exporters namely Thailand, Vietnam and India. <br /><br />This paper also identifies some of the downscaled impacts of climate change that may continue to affect rice production in these regions until the end of the 21st century. The authors also identify public actions and policy responses in India, Thailand and Vietnam.</div>

21 Feb 2017 04:16:58 GMT

Weather-index based crop insurance as a social adaptation to climate change and variability in the Upper West Region of Ghana: developing a participatory approach

<div>Climate change and variability are major challenges to rain-fed crop production in Africa. This paper presents a report on a pilot project to test a concept for operationalising weather-index crop insurance as a social adaptation to the climate change and variability problem in the Upper West Region of Ghana. An analysis of long-term weather variables showed rising temperature of 1.7oC over a period of 53 years as well as major shifts in rainfall patterns. Farmers face a new reality that cannot be addressed with their indigenous knowledge alone.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>The aim of this paper is to record this process and to put the results into recent context, through discussing them through the lens of insurance operations and research in Ghana. Ensuing discussions showed that although all stakeholders considered the participatory design tools to be meritorious, a number of logistical challenges were identified that need to be addressed for effective scaling.</div><div><br />The study also highlighted the high spatial variability of rainfall in the Upper West region of Ghana, showing the necessity of satellite-derived rainfall products. Finally, the framework suggested in this report highlights the complexity and the institutional structures required to implement an effective insurance.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>In effect, this simple study has exposed the complexities and intricacies that must be overcome in establishing a sustainable insurance scheme in Ghana.</div></div>

21 Feb 2017 03:38:43 GMT

Repositioning Chinese development finance in Latin America: opportunities for green finance

<div>China is one of the largest creditors of Latin American and the Caribbean and has loaned the region more than $125 billion since 2005. However, the&nbsp; composition of China’s financing in the region has been concentrated in commodity related sectors that are currently on the decline. <br /><br />This policy brief notes the extent to which Chinese finance is concentrated in new green economy sectors, and finds that China is not taking full opportunity of the potential in this sector. Moreover, as the global commodity boom has declined, much of China’s investments in the region have been exposed to significant risk, including prominent environmental and social risks. Despite great strides whereby the Chinese government has established a series of guidelines on greening overseas investment over the last few years, China’s development banks and companies are lacking the policies and staffing to identify and fully mitigate such risks. <br /><br />This policy brief reviews the green profile of Chinese development finance in LAC and analyses environment related risks and policies for Chinese overseas investment. It also outlines the opportunities of green finance in LAC and how blending instruments can mobilise green financial flows that are beneficial for both China and LAC.</div>

21 Feb 2017 02:46:19 GMT

High and Dry: Climate change, water and the economy

<p>This World Bank reports finds that water scarcity, exacerbated by climate change, could hinder economic growth, spur migration, and spark conflict. However, most countries can neutralize the adverse impacts of water scarcity by taking action to allocate and use water resources more efficiently.</p><p>Key Findings</p><ul><li>Water scarcity, exacerbated by climate change, could cost some regions up to 6% of their GDP, spur migration, and spark conflict.</li><li>The combined effects of growing populations, rising incomes, and expanding cities will see demand for water rising exponentially, while supply becomes more erratic and uncertain.</li><li>Unless action is taken soon, water will become scarce in regions where it is currently abundant - such as Central Africa and East Asia - and scarcity will greatly worsen in regions where water is already in short supply - such as the Middle East and the Sahel in Africa. These regions could see their growth rates decline by as much as 6% of GDP by 2050 due to water-related impacts on agriculture, health, and incomes.</li><li>Water insecurity could multiply the risk of conflict. Food price spikes caused by droughts can inflame latent conflicts and drive migration. Where economic growth is impacted by rainfall, episodes of droughts and floods have generated waves of migration and spikes in violence within countries.</li><li>The negative impacts of climate change on water could be neutralized with better policy decisions, with some regions standing to improve their growth rates by up to 6% with better water resource management.</li><li>Improved water stewardship pays high economic dividends. When governments respond to water shortages by boosting efficiency and allocating even 25% of water to more highly-valued uses, such as more efficient agricultural practices, losses decline dramatically and for some regions may even vanish.</li><li>In the world’s extremely dry regions, more far-reaching policies are needed to avoid inefficient water use. Stronger policies and reforms are needed to cope with deepening climate stresses.</li><li>Policies and investments that can help lead countries to more water secure and climate-resilient economies include:</li><ul><li>Better planning for water resource allocation</li><li>Adoption of incentives to increase water efficiency, and</li><li>Investments in infrastructure for more secure water supplies and availability.</li></ul></ul><div>[author's summary]</div>

10 Feb 2017 04:33:21 GMT

Sustainable development and the water–energy–food nexus: A perspective on livelihoods

<p>The water–energy–food nexus is being promoted as a conceptual tool for achieving sustainable development. Frameworks for implementing nexus thinking, however, have failed to explicitly or adequately incorporate sustainable&nbsp;<em>livelihoods</em>&nbsp;perspectives. This is counterintuitive given that livelihoods are key to achieving sustainable development. In this paper we present a critical review of nexus approaches and identify potential linkages with sustainable livelihoods theory and practice, to deepen our understanding of the interrelated dynamics between human populations and the natural environment. Building upon this review, we explore the concept of ‘environmental livelihood security’ – which encompasses a balance between natural resource supply and human demand on the environment to promote sustainability – and develop an integrated nexus-livelihoods framework for examining the environmental livelihood security of a system. The outcome is an integrated framework with the capacity to measure and monitor environmental livelihood security of whole systems by accounting for the water, energy and food requisites for livelihoods at multiple spatial scales and institutional levels. We anticipate this holistic approach will not only provide a significant contribution to achieving national and regional sustainable development targets, but will also be effective for promoting equity amongst individuals and communities in local and global development agendas. [authors abstract]</p>

10 Feb 2017 04:15:50 GMT

The Water-Energy-Food Nexus: A new approach in support of food security and sustainable agriculture

<p>This FAO note gives a brief introduction to the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) Nexus conceptual framework as a useful way to describe and address the complex and interrelated nature of our global resource systems. It puts forward WEF as a conceptual approach:</p><ul><li>to better understand and systematically analyse the interactions between the natural environment and human activities</li><li>to help work towards a more coordinated management and use of natural resources across sectors and scales</li><li>to help identify and manage trade-offs andto build synergies allowing for more integrated and cost-effective planning, decision-making, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.</li></ul>

10 Feb 2017 04:05:24 GMT

Display Next Eldis Climate Change [eldis.org]

The Nagoya Protocol on access to genetic resources and benefit sharing: User-country measures and implementation in India

<p>User-measure requirements are the cornerstone of the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization developed under the Convention on Biological Diversity. These have come about as the result of hard, persistent pressure from developing countries on developed countries to take co-responsibility in making the access and benefit sharing regime functional. The degree of national implementation of the user measure requirements will thus be an important indicator of the success of the Nagoya Protocol. This report reviews these requirements and the situations as regards national implementation so far. It reviews the&nbsp; status and options for India in its implementation and notes some future challenges.</p>

30 Nov 2016 05:22:23 GMT

The ocean and us: how healthy marine and coastal ecosystems support the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

<p>The ocean has been a cornerstone of human development throughout the history of civilization. People continue to come to the coasts to build some of the largest cities on the planet, with thriving economies, culture and communities. Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide us with resources and trade opportunities that greatly benefit human well-being.</p><p>These benefits are often taken for granted as we fail to recognize their underlying value. In our narrow pursuit of progress through purely economic and social development we often fail to protect the health of our marine system that we depend upon. Today, however, we increasingly realize the importance of healthy ecosystems for sustainable development that is reflected in the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) recently adopted by the United Nations. We can no longer afford to apply an antagonistic paradigm between development and conservation. The SDG framework provides the world with the opportunity to transform how we think about the ‘Oceans and Us’.</p><p>This publication highlights the critical contribution of healthy marine and coastal ecosystems to achieving the SDGs and describes the role of credible and accessible data, well communicated knowledge generated through dialogue with users, in supporting informed decision-making.</p>

23 Sep 2016 12:53:59 GMT

Mesophotic coral ecosystems - a lifeboat for coral reefs?

<p>The shallow coral reefs that we all know, are like the tip of an iceberg - they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit.&nbsp; The invisible reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) are widespread and diverse, however they remain largely unexplored in most parts of the world.&nbsp; With the global climate heating up, the world’s shallow coral reefs are predicted to experience increasing levels of catastrophic bleaching. This report asks the question – can MCEs provide a “life boat” for shallow coral reefs that are suffering decimation from rising sea surface temperatures and other anthropogenic impacts?</p><p>Picture a coral reef — most people will probably imagine brightly coloured corals, fish and other animals swimming in well-lit shallow waters. In fact, the coral reefs that live close to the surface of the sea — the ones that we can swim, snorkel, or dive near and see from space — are only a small portion of the complete coral reef ecosystem. Light-dependent corals can live in much deeper water (up to a depth of 150 m in clear waters). The shallow coral reefs from the surface of the sea to 30–40&nbsp; m below are more like the tip of an iceberg; they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit. These intermediate depth reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs), are the subject of this report.</p>

23 Sep 2016 01:49:16 GMT

Climate change threatens Hawaiian forest birds

<p>In Hawai'i, geograpahic isolation has prevented the natural establishment of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and many insect species, such as biting mosquitoes. Isolation has also facilitated the spectacular evolutionary radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers from a single small flock of North American finches into more than 50 species and subspecies of endemic forest birds.</p><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942">With the arrival of humans came the clearing of forests and the introduction of non-native species and their diseases. More than 40 mosquito species have been intercepted in Hawai‘i, and six have become established, most recently in 2004.</div><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942"><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158">As global warming raises air temperatures, their seasonal high elevation refuge will shrink and eventually disappear. It is likely that the spread of mosquitoes and avian malaria (as well as avian pox) into the high elevations of Hawai'i will eventually lead to the extinct ion of many, perhaps all, of the honeycreepers that currently survive in these areas.</div></div><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158"><div data-canvas-width="205.90692343899823">Unfortunately, the rate of warming in Hawai‘i may not give these birds enough time to develop resistance. Without human assistance, global warming combined with avian malaria may overwhelm Hawai'i honeycreepers and other forest bird species.</div></div>

22 Sep 2016 10:23:43 GMT

CITES alone cannot combat illegal wildlife trade

<p>The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) will address the growing threat from illegal trade at its forthcoming Conference of the Parties (CoP17). CITES is a regulatory treaty that is neither self-executing nor legally binding unless its provisions are reproduced in member states’ laws. Approximately half the parties still need to develop legislation to strengthen their implementation of the convention; 10 of the 17 parties designated by the CITES Secretariat as needing priority attention are in Africa. There is thus opportunity to harmonise legal frameworks for more effective CITES implementation. While parties improve their environmental laws, the secretariat can foster transregional consensus on trade controls, improve synergy with other conventions in the context of environmental crime, prioritise support to CITES scientific and management authorities in high- biodiversity countries, especially those subject to trade suspensions for non-compliance, and recommend raising penalties for illegal transactions in wildlife commodities known to finance conflict.</p>

09 Sep 2016 02:56:25 GMT

The 2016 World Conservation Congress: exploring a win–win agenda for people and the planet

<div data-canvas-width="523.7833333333333">The World Conservation Congress (WCC), one of the world’s largest environmental gatherings, is convened every four years under the auspices of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to find collaborative solutions to conserve global biodiversity and ecosystems, and harness the solutions nature offers to global development challenges.<br /><br /></div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">The WCC convenes in Honolulu, Hawai’i from 1–10 September 2016. The congress will include the IUCN’s 1 300 member organisations from across 161 countries, all seeking to develop the conservation and governance responses necessary to tackle the drivers of biodiversity loss. At the WCC, IUCN members representing government, the private sector and civil society will vote on motions and resolutions that lay out the global conservation agenda for the next four years. The 100 proposed motions are aligned with the overarching objectives of valuing and conserving nature, ensuring the effective and equitable governance of its use, and deploying nature-based solutions to global challenges in climate, food and development.</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">Recommendations:</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668"><ul><li>the IUCN, and its 2017-2020 Programme, must support the overarching objectives of the post-2015 UN development agenda and seek to establish an international framework for ecosystem-based climate action</li><li>African stakeholders must call for clearly identified roles and responsibilities, and associated action plans, to enhance the ownership of resolutions and support their implementation</li><li>African members must ensure consolidated voting positions, aligned with rigorous scientific data, which highlight the continent’s most important and vulnerable ecosystems and biodiversity</li></ul></div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div>

09 Sep 2016 02:48:52 GMT

Global climate change impacts on Pacific Islands terrestrial biodiversity: a review

<p>The islands of the Pacific region hold three of the 35 global biodiversity hotspots with large numbers of endemic species. Global climate change will exacerbate the challenges faced by the biodiversity of this region . In this review, the authors identify trends in characteristics for 305 terrestrial species threatened by climate change and severe weather according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). We then review the literature on observed and potential impacts of climate change on terrestrial biodive rsity , focusing on the species'€™ characteristics that were identified. High - elevation ecosystems such as cloud montane forests are projected to disappear entirely by the year 2100 , with corresponding global losses of their endemic biodiversity. Sea level ri se threatens restricted range species on small low - lying atolls. Shifts in distribution may be possible for generalist species , but r ange shifts will be difficult for species with small distributions, specialized habitat requirements, slow dispersal rates , and species at high elevations.</p><p>Accurate assessments of climate change impacts on biodiversity of the region are difficult because of confusion about nomenclature , the many species unknown to science, the lack of baseline data on species'€™ ecology and distributions, and lack of fine resolution elevation data for very small islands. Furthermore, synergistic interactions of climate change with other threats like habitat loss and invasive species have not been comprehensively assessed. Addressing these knowledge gaps will be difficult for Pacific island nations due to limited financial resources and expertise.</p>

18 Aug 2016 11:00:54 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Latin America and the Caribbean: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4, the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s global biodiversity goals<br />and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. <br /><br />This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. It is the second edition of the State of Biodiversity in<br />the Latin America and the Caribbean report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the Latin America and the Caribbean region.<br /><br />The report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other national and regional reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target-by-target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have beenbroken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken with key national institutions in the region. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets, which do not extend past 2011, have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but further efforts to update this information are needed.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in the Latin America and Caribbean region, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:<br /><br /></p><ul><li>declines in species abundance and high risks of species extinctions continue</li><li>rates of habitat loss in Latin America and the Caribbean have slowed but remain high</li><li>certain pressures associated with rapid economic growth and social inequities are impacting the region’s natural resources</li><li>agricultural expansion and intensification to increase both livestock, arable and commodities production continue</li><li>the region is undergoing major infrastructure development of dams and roads</li><li>the impacts on biodiversity of high concentrations of population in urban areas are particularly significant within the region</li><li>country economies within the region are very highly dependent on natural resources</li><li>resource extraction for minerals and hydrocarbons has, in some cases, led to locally devastating direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity such as vegetation removal, water and soil pollution and contamination</li><li>transboundary and local air pollution is now recognised as an environmental factor in human health in the region</li><li>climate change induced impacts on coral reefs and montane habitats within the region are now being observed</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:40:28 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4 (GBO-4), the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s global biodiversity goals and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. <br /><br />This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. This is the second edition of The State of Biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets for the Asia Pacific region.<br /><br />The report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the CBD, other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets which do not extend past 2011 have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but that further efforts to update this information are needed.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in the region, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:</p><ul><li>the exceptional biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific continues to decline</li><li>combinations of human-induced factors are a key driver of biodiversity loss</li><li>Asia and the Pacific continue to experience deforestation and forest degradation</li><li>rapid growth in demand for wildlife products is fuelling unsustainable trade, with impacts inside and outside of the region</li><li>invasive alien species create particular pressures on the oceanic islands</li><li>marine ecosystems are vulnerable to growth in commercial and artisanal fisheries</li><li>te negative impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are exacerbating the effects of other pressures on Asia and the Pacific’s biodiversity</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:26:47 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in West Asia: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4 (GBO-4), the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 , published by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), provides a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s biodiversity goals and associated twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contains limited regional information.</p><p>This second edition of the State of Biodiversity in West Asia report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment, serving as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the West Asia region specifically. This report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for the Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in West Asia, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:<br /><br /></p><ul><li>available biodiversity and ecosystem service information for the region is limited, which has made the reporting task challenging, and in many cases data are too poor and fragmentary to allow robust conclusions</li><li>the major drivers of biodiversity decline have seen a rapid increase, including urban expansion, the spread of intensive agricultural systems and cultivation of marginal land resulting from considerable population growth. Such changes necessitate reliance on resources imported from elsewhere in the world, meaning that West Asia’s ecological footprint is growing sharply and now exceeds the global average</li><li>the volatile political situation in parts of the region means&nbsp; conservation work has been unable to proceed in the countries or areas experiencing significant internal and international conflicts and political instability in recent years</li><li>protected areas networks in West Asia are limited in both coverage and management effectiveness</li><li>wildlife crime linked to hunting is a continuing problem with ineffective enforcement of regulations and legislation</li><li>water scarcity, driven by rapidly rising demand, is threatening the survival of the region’s wetland habitats</li><li>multiple anthropogenic and climatic pressures are interacting to threaten the integrity of marine ecosystems</li><li>the region is likely to be one of the hardest hit by the direct and indirect impacts of climate change such as sea level rise, sea temperature rise, increasing water scarcity and ground water salinity, and desertification</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:17:22 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Africa: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4, the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 , provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan'€™s global biodiversity goals and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. It is the second edition of the State of Biodiversity in Africa report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the African region.</p><p>This report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets which do not extend past 2011 have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but that further efforts to update this information.</p><div data-canvas-width="233.58124999999998">The key messages about the state of biodiversity in Africa, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:</div><div data-canvas-width="295.27616666666665"><ul><li>overall, biodiversity in Africa continues to decline, with ongoing losses of species and habitats</li><li>ongoing loss of biodiversity in Africa is driven by a combination of human-induced factors</li><li>Africa’s freshwater ecosystems and their biodiversity are especially threatened</li><li>Africa continues to experience deforestation and forest degradation</li><li>the negative impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are exacerbating the effects of all these pressures</li><li>nonetheless the report identifies a number of important responses which have taken place since 2011</li><li>African countries are working collaboratively to address particular Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>there is a growing portfolio of international support for African countries to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>African countries are using ecosystem service valuation and investment in REDD+ to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>many African countries have already achieved their 17% terrestrial protected area targets, and many others are working towards this target on land, as well as on the 10% marine protected areas target on the sea</li><li>Africa is making increasing use of ecosystem-based conservation and restoration of natural resources</li></ul></div>

16 Aug 2016 04:05:56 GMT

Seeing through fishers' lenses: Exploring marine ecological changes within Mafia Island Merine Park, Tanzania

<p>nsights from traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of the marine environment are difficult to integrate into conventional science knowledge (CSK) initiatives. Where TEK is integrated into CSK at all, it is usually either marginalized or restricted to CSK modes of interpretation, hence limiting its potential contribution to the understanding of social-ecological systems. This study uses semi-directive interviews, direct observations, and structured open-ended questionnaires (n = 103) to explore TEK of marine ecological changes occurring within the Mafia Island Marine Park, Tanzania, and factors contributing to these changes. It illuminates TEK insights that can be valuable in parallel with CSK to provide a more nuanced understanding of ecological changes. In some areas, fishers observed coral reef growth, increased fish abundance, and increased sea temperatures, whereas in others, they reported decreases in sea level, coral cover, fish abundance, catch composition, catch quantities, and fish size. They associated these changes with interrelated factors emanating from environmental processes, conservation outcomes, marketing constraints, population dynamics, and disappearance of cultural traditions. Utilizing TEK without restricting it to CSK modes of interpretation has the potential to improve CSK initiatives by promoting complementarity and mutual enrichment between the two kinds of knowledge, thereby contributing new insights that may enhance adaptive management and resilience in social-ecological systems.</p>

12 Jun 2016 09:06:59 GMT

Dry-season greening of Amazon forests

<p>Evidence from ecological studies, eddy flux towers, and satellites shows that many tropical forests &lsquo;green up&rsquo; during higher sunlight annual dry seasons, suggesting they are more limited by light than water. Morton et al.reported that satellite-observed dry-season green up in Amazon forests is an artefact of seasonal variations in sun- sensor geometry.</p><p>However, here these researchers argue that even after artefact correction, data from Morton et al. show statistically significant increases in canopy greenness during the dry season. Integrating corrected satellite with ground observations indicates that dry-season forest greening is prevalent in Amazonia, probably reflecting large-scale seasonal upregulation of photosynthesis by canopy leaf dynamics.</p><p>[adapted from source]</p>

21 Mar 2016 07:31:29 GMT

Spotlight on publications: Brazil’s ethanol programme

<p>This Spotlight highlights some of the key publications that study, analyse and document Brazil&rsquo;s ethanol programme. The publications focus on the following specific issues: Brazilian government policies to promote the sector; sustainability issues; expansion, land use and agro-ecological zoning of sugarcane; bagasse, cogeneration and bioelectricity; and advanced biofuels. Together these resources highlight the current key issues surrounding the sector, offering a useful entry for readers from other regions who wish to understand the Brazilian experience with ethanol.</p>

16 Mar 2016 03:19:51 GMT

Traditional gender roles of men and women in natural resource conservation among the vhavenda people in Zimbabwe: implications for sustainable development

<p>Natural resource conservation is key to the concept of sustainable development, yet environmental pressures continue to increase, including soil degradation, water availability, and nutrient cycling. Within natural resource conservation, women play an equally essential, yet differentiated, role as men. This means that analysis of gender interactions in relation to environmental management is imperative for sustainable development. To this end, this journal paper explores&nbsp;the traditional gender roles of men and women in the conservation of natural resources among the vhavenda people in Zimbabwe. It seeks to draw lessons regarding participation, particularly of women, that can inform wider sustainable development efforts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>African feminism and post- colonial theory were used as theoretical frameworks to analyse the practices of the vhavenda, while a Harvard analytic framework and the social relation approach to gender analysis were used as tools to map the gender roles in their conservation activities. The research also used a phenomenological research approach as part of the purely qualitative study, to ensure that understanding emerged directly from the experiences of the men and women themselves. In-depth, unstructured interviews were conducted with respondents aged seventy and above, with five females and three males interviewed in the Beit-Bridge district in south west Zimbabwe. This demographic was chosen for their extensive knowledge of traditional methods.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The research revealed that the type of resources that were of concern to the vhavenda people included soil, water, and specific plant species that were important sources of firewood, timber, and food. Certain trees are conserved for sacred and cultural reasons, with rules as to who can cut down trees, and how. Conservation of water was not gendered, with both men and women participating in actions such as fencing off water-sources from animals. Soil degradation prevention takes precedence over correction, with men cutting terraces to prevent soil erosion, and women planting grasses. Animal species conservation depended on availability, importance, and use, while the study also revealed that although women and men had different uses and benefits from natural resources, there was an ethic of cooperation, dialogue, and collaboration among men and women when it comes to resource conservation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The study recommends that natural resource conservation in the context of sustainable development, that is, using modern technologies and methods, needs to embrace some of the practices of the vhavenda. these include complementarity, cooperation, inclusiveness, dialogue, and negotiation between men and women. In promoting equal participation between genders, this approach will help to overcome some of the barriers of participation seen elsewhere, especially unequal gender relations that cause gendered subordination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

05 Mar 2016 04:09:22 GMT

Display Next Eldis Biodiversity [eldis.org]

Green talks LIVE: Degraded Waters

On Thursday 6 April (13:00 CEST), join Hannah Leckie & Xavier Leflaive of the OECD Environment Directorate to discuss emerging solutions in OECD countries, that can guide the design and implementation of policies to control diffuse water pollution. Water pollution is on the rise due to indirect ‘diffuse’ sources of pollution from both agricultural and urban environments.

Thu, 06 Apr 2017 18:35:00 GMT

The water challenge

With widespread competing demands on water, maintaining environmental sustainability and meeting the needs of the most vulnerable members of society must both be addressed. The OECD provides policy guidance on water to OECD members and non-OECD countries, covering a wide range of issues. Explore the policy areas below to access the latest OECD work in each area.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 10:45:00 GMT

Diffuse water pollution: an invisible and growing threat - Insights blog

On 22 March each year the world turns its attention to the global water crisis on the occasion of World Water Day. Water policies around the world are in need of urgent reform. Water - an essential natural resource on which all life depends - has become a global garbage can.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 08:29:00 GMT

Environmental pressures rising in New Zealand

New Zealanders enjoy a high environmental quality of life and access to pristine wilderness. However, New Zealand’s growth model, based largely on exploiting natural resources, is starting to show its environmental limits with increasing greenhouse gas emissions and water pollution, according to a new OECD report.

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 21:00:00 GMT

Korea needs to put green growth vision into action

Korea has improved access to environmental services and become a world leader in climate change mitigation technology.

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Estonia should reduce its oil shale reliance for greener growth

Estonia needs to move faster to reduce its dependence on oil shale so it can advance towards a greener economy and reduce air pollution and waste generation, according to a new OECD report.

Wed, 01 Mar 2017 11:00:00 GMT

OECD project on Growth, Investment and the Low-Carbon Transition

The OECD is undertaking a major project on the economic growth and investment implications of the transition to a low-carbon, climate resilient economy in the context of theGerman G20 Presidency. The final report from the project, entitled "Investing in Climate, Investing in Growth", will be launched in the margins of the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in Berlin on 23 May 2017.

Tue, 28 Feb 2017 17:46:00 GMT

Mainstream biodiversity

The OECD has been working on the economies and policies for biodiversity for more than two decades, providing a platform for exchanging knowledge and good practice insights. The OECD is helping countries with analysis for more environmentally-effective, cost-efficient and distributionally-equitable policies for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use. Find out more.

Tue, 28 Feb 2017 14:49:00 GMT

Action on climate change

The OECD has a long experience of exchanging knowledge and good practices through effective, policy-orientated and collaborative initiatives. The OECD is helping countries with policy analysis and guidance to implement NDCs and prepare their action plans on climate change mitigation and adaptation. How is the OECD supporting action on climate change? Find out more.

Fri, 24 Feb 2017 15:12:00 GMT

More private capital for infrastructure investment in Asia?

Since the financial crisis, infrastructure investment has moved up the political agenda in most countries – now also including the USA. Asia is often seen as the world’s infrastructure laboratory, with massive construction of transport and energy projects. This article discusses infrastructure investment, private finance, and institutional investors in Asia from a global perspective.

Fri, 03 Feb 2017 10:23:00 GMT

Green investment banks

To leverage the impact of relatively limited public resources, over a dozen national and sub-national governments have created public green investment banks (GIBs) and GIB-like entities.

Tue, 31 Jan 2017 11:23:00 GMT

The Potential Benefits of Transboundary Co-operation in Georgia and Azerbaijan: Kura River Basin - Environment Working Paper

This study was one of the first attempts to evaluate and quantify the benefits of transboundary co-operation between Georgia and Azerbaijan. A specific framework for inventorying these benefits, taking into account all the different dimensions of transboundary water management, was built and applied to the major transboundary water bodies.

Tue, 24 Jan 2017 14:50:00 GMT

Greater efforts needed to safeguard biodiversity

The world must ramp up its efforts to use natural resources more sustainably and conserve biological diversity and the ecosystems on which we depend for human life, the OECD today told participants at the COP13 Convention on Biological Diversity in Cancun, Mexico.

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 17:51:00 GMT

OECD at #COP22

The UN Climate Change Conference (COP22) was held in Bab Ighli, Marrakech, Morocco from 7-18 November 2016. Check out the OECD's contributions and our programme of side events to the conference.

Mon, 07 Nov 2016 10:33:00 GMT

Making climate finance work for women: Overview of bilateral ODA to gender and climate change

This brief is a contribution to the 22nd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) and a submission of recommendations for the renewal of the Lima Work Programme on Gender. It provides an overview of how well members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) are integrating gender equality into their bilateral aid to climate change.

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 11:58:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Environment [oecd.org]

Rio+20: A voice from Sheffield, UK

Ruby Smith, 21, is a support planning co-ordinator for Sheffield Council, in Sheffield, UKRio+20 is a unique and historic opportunity for world leaders to prioritise development and plan a better world for future generations.I would like to ask delegates to remember the importance of putting...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Rio+20: A voice from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Seida Saric is country director for Women for Women International in Bosnia and HerzegovinaFoundations of any development rest on active and equal participation of both men and women in social, political and economic spheres of life. Women play a much more active role which, in turn, does not have...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

This policy brief, produced by Care International, outlines a bilateral Reduced Emissions form Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) pilot project ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Letter

This letter is written by the Executive Chair of Indonesia's National Council on Climate Change, Rachmat Witoelar; it outlines Indonesia's Nationally ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Readiness Preparation Proposals (R - PP)

This document was submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), a World Bank programme that aims to assist developing countries with Reduced ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Cities and Resilience

This policy brief highlights the key issues discussed at the Cities and Resilience Dialogue held in Bangkok, Thailand, in September 2009. The event assessed ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

This policy brief, produced by Care International, outlines a bilateral Reduced Emissions form Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) pilot project ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Letter

This letter is written by the Executive Chair of Indonesia's National Council on Climate Change, Rachmat Witoelar; it outlines Indonesia's Nationally ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Readiness Preparation Proposals (R - PP)

This document was submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), a World Bank programme that aims to assist developing countries with Reduced ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

The doughnut can help Rio+20 see sustainable development in the round | Kate Raworth

Resource use has both an environmental ceiling and a social foundation, below which lies deprivation, but the doughnut-shaped space between the two demands our attentionIn 2009, Johan Rockström of the Stockholm Resilience Centre brought together some of the world's leading Earth-system scientists...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Rio+20 Earth summit: walkout at 'green economy' talks

Negotiators from developing countries insist wealthy nations must help fund their move to sustainable developmentEurope's financial crisis should not be used as an excuse for inaction and underfunding of moves towards a more sustainable global economy, a senior Brazilian diplomat warned at the...

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

U.S. proposes tighter rules on soot pollution

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration proposed stricter standards to control harmful soot from heavy industry on Friday, a move expected to save lives but which drew criticism from Republicans and industry worried the costs of compliance will hurt the economy.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Analysis: CO2 market has failed to promote cleaner energy

LONDON (Reuters) - Europe's emissions trading scheme has failed to create incentives for utilities to use cleaner energy fuels, meaning that governments will have to switch to simpler tools, such as subsidies and regulation, to enforce emissions reduction targets.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Australia cuts number of firms to pay carbon tax

CANBERRA (Reuters) - Australia will levy a controversial carbon tax on about half the number of companies originally expected, a government list released on Friday shows, which may limit the economic and political impact of the tax which starts on July 1.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Cities Bet They Can Curb Traffic With Games of Chance

To tackle congestion, clogged urban centers are testing the lure of prizes to persuade motorists to change their driving habits.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Africa: Can Rio+20 Create a Climate of Change for Poor Communities?

[AlertNet]Climate change is often described in numbers - degrees of temperature rise, metric tonnes of carbon emissions. These numbers add up to devastating consequences: erratic rainfall, crop failure, hunger. But climate change also has a human face.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Africa: Seizing the Opportunity for a Sustainable Future

[AlertNet]The 1992 Earth Summit was a bright moment for the environmental movement. For the first time, presidents and prime ministers - more than 100 in all - were "coming together to save the earth," as a headline on the cover of Time magazine put it.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Display Next Earthwire Climate [earthwire.org]

World Business

Why Apple's red iPhones are not 'Red' in China

Apple's Red iPhone is going on sale, but in China it is doing things a bit differently. Why?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 06:45:31 GMT

Call for 'decently paid' UK maternity leave

The TUC says UK mothers may get a relatively good deal of maternity leave but fare much worse on pay.

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:18:17 GMT

Eddie Stobart: Lorry firm targets £550m stock market listing

The haulage firm, known for its green and red lorries, plans to list its shares in London next month.

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 16:41:24 GMT

Brexit: Single market benefit 'largely imaginary'

Author of a report argues that no trade deal is better than a bad deal with the EU.

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 10:29:47 GMT

Apple 'paid no tax' in New Zealand for at least a decade

Apple is under scrutiny following reports it has paid no tax in New Zealand since 2007.

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 09:09:46 GMT

Kenya starts selling bonds via mobile phones

Kenya is the first country to sell government bonds exclusively to citizens via their phones.

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 14:53:48 GMT

Higher fuel prices hit UK retail sales

Sales rose more than expected last month, but the underlying trend suggests fuel costs are starting to bite.

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 11:11:32 GMT

Libor expert witness texted for help

A prosecution witness called by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) admits texting friends for help explaining trader terminology.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:37:35 GMT

Next sees first annual profit fall in eight years

The retailer warns of "another tough year ahead" as shoppers shift spending away from clothing.

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 09:36:07 GMT

UBS charges customers to deposit euros

Swiss bank UBS plans to charge a fee for customers who deposit more than a million euros.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 15:27:40 GMT

Investors urge Dulux owner to hold takeover talks

AkzoNobel says an improved offer from US rival PPG Industries is still too low.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 13:51:11 GMT

Hermes reports record annual profits

French luxury goods firm posts better than expected results amid 'uncertain' outlook.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 10:15:28 GMT

Two major US technology firms 'tricked out of $100m'

A social media firm was among two companies targeted in an email phishing scam, officials say.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 13:39:49 GMT

Screwfix boosts Kingfisher's profits

The B&Q and Screwfix owner says resilient UK sales gave it a boost, but warns of future uncertainty.

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:18:25 GMT

BBC World News business headlines

The latest international business headlines from BBC World News.

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 19:03:16 GMT

Display Next World Business from BBC News [bbc.co.uk/news]

Brazil's second-biggest chicken buyer adds checks on meat

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Saudi Arabia, the world's second-largest buyer of Brazil's chicken, ordered new inspections of meat from the South American nation after allegations that expo...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:59:02 GMT

Europe stock markets fall as Trump doubts take toll

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Global stock markets sank yesterday as a Trump-fuelled surge stumbled on doubts over his ability to fire up the world's biggest economy. The dollar also stru...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:59:02 GMT

PetroChina's crude oil trading head quits

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) The head of crude oil trading at Chinese state energy giant PetroChina has resigned after 20 years with the company, a rare departure from a state-owned enter...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:59:01 GMT

UK economy is growing solidly despite inflation hit, says BoE report

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Britain's economy looks set to defy a slowdown again this year as the country moves closer to leaving the European Union, with the hit to shoppers from surgin...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:59:01 GMT

QIB named the 'Best Islamic Financial Institution in GCC' by Global Finance

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Qatar Islamic Bank (QIB), Qatar's leading Shariah-principled lender, has been named &lsquo;Best Islamic Financial Institution in Qatar and the Gulf Cooperatio...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:59:00 GMT

Qatar- Goic takes part in '1st Gulf Statistical Forum'

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) The Gulf Organisation for Industrial Consulting (Goic) has participated in the &lsquo;1st Gulf Statistical Forum' held under the patronage of the Custodian of...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:59:00 GMT

QSE holds educational day at Qatar University college to raise students' awareness of market

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) The Qatar Stock Exchange (QSE), in cooperation with Qatar University, yesterday held an educational day at the College of Business and Economics. The event, ...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:58:59 GMT

Qatar- Mannai Corp stake in GFI Informatique helps boost 2016 net profit to QR535mn

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Mannai Corporation's investment in French IT services group GFI Informatique helped raise its 2016 net profit to reach QR535mn amid 'subdued economic conditio...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:58:59 GMT

Ordinary Venezuelans help to feed the hungry

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) Their clothes torn and dirty, nine barefoot children yell and applaud as a convoy of cars approaches on a busy street in Venezuela's capital. Volunteers emer...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:58:58 GMT

19 Maharashtra MLAs suspended for 9 months

(MENAFN - Gulf Times) In a drastic move, 19 opposition legislators were yesterday suspended for nine months by Maharashtra Speaker Haribhau Bagade for creating ruckus over farm loa...

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 01:58:57 GMT

Display Next MENAFN Regional Business [menafn.com]

An inclusive South Africa needs more investment and jobs

South Africa has made impressive social progress over the past two decades, lifting millions of people out of poverty and broadening access to essential services like water, electricity and sanitation.

Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:00:00 GMT

Employment situation, first quarter 2015, OECD

OECD employment rate increases to 66.1% in first quarter of 2015

Thu, 16 Jul 2015 09:19:00 GMT

La OCDE establece la hoja de ruta para la adhesión de Costa Rica

La OCDE ha definido las pautas encaminadas a la adhesión de Costa Rica a la Organización, reforzando así su compromiso de dar cabida a nuevos países miembros.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:00:00 GMT

OECD establishes roadmap for membership with Costa Rica

The OECD set out a clear path for Costa Rica’s accession to the Organisation, reinforcing the OECD’s commitment to further extend its global membership.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 14:00:00 GMT

Countries should address disruptive effects of the digital economy

Countries are making increased efforts to develop their digital economies in a way that will maximise social and economic benefits, but now need to address the risk of disruption in areas like privacy and jobs, according to a new OECD report.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 11:00:00 GMT

OECD holds three tax events in Addis to promote domestic resource mobilisation

The OECD is holding three tax events on the side-lines of the 3rd International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Mon, 13 Jul 2015 21:01:00 GMT

Tax Inspectors Without Borders:OECD and UNDP to work with developing countries to make tax audits more effective

The OECD and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have launched a new initiative to help developing countries bolster domestic revenues by strengthening their tax audit capacities.

Mon, 13 Jul 2015 11:00:00 GMT

OECD establishes roadmap for membership with Lithuania

The OECD set out a clear path for Lithuania’s accession to the Organisation, reinforcing the OECD’s commitment to further extend its global membership.

Fri, 10 Jul 2015 12:01:00 GMT

Jobs outlook improving slowly but millions risk being trapped at bottom of economic ladder

The jobs recovery is slowly gathering pace, but employment will remain well below pre-crisis levels in many countries, especially in Europe, through to the end of 2016, according to a new OECD report.

Thu, 09 Jul 2015 10:00:00 GMT

Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, July 2015

Composite leading indicators continue to point to growth convergence in most major economies

Wed, 08 Jul 2015 09:23:00 GMT

Canada could do more to help laid-off workers

Canada should improve the support its employment services offer to help laid-off workers find a new job more quickly, according to a new OECD report.

Tue, 07 Jul 2015 15:00:00 GMT

Slow growth in health spending but Europe lags behind

Many European countries saw further reductions in health spending in 2013, according to OECD Health Statistics 2015. Health spending continued to shrink in Greece, Italy and Portugal in 2013. Most countries in the European Union reported real per capita health spending below the levels of 2009. Outside of Europe, health spending has been growing at around 2.5% per year since 2010.

Tue, 07 Jul 2015 10:00:00 GMT

Relaunch productivity to boost growth and well-being

The slowdown in productivity over the past decade has added to concerns about the long-term economic outlook. But new OECD research shows that policy reforms can revive the diffusion of innovation and make better use of human talent to clear the path for higher and more inclusive productivity growth.

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:00:00 GMT

More effort needed on government integrity to help restore public trust

Countries need to do more to identify and reduce conflicts of interest and other breaches of integrity to help win back trust in national governments, which surveys suggest remains below pre-crisis levels, according to a new OECD report.

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 12:46:00 GMT

Contributions to GDP growth: first quarter 2015, Quarterly National Accounts, OECD

Private consumption, main driver of OECD GDP growth in the first quarter of 2015

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 09:35:00 GMT

Display Next OECD News [oecd.org]

Economic Development

The closing of democratic space for trade unions

Weakening of workers' rights in most regions is being aggravated by severe crackdowns on freedom of speech and assembly, according to the 2016 Global Rights Index. Restrictions on freedom of speech and assembly, including severe crackdowns in some countries, increased by 22%, with 50 out of 141 countries surveyed recording restrictions.

Agenda for transformation, solidarity, democracy

The year 2015 was marked on the one hand by the inability of the European Union (EU) to emerge from the crisis, and on the other by a dramatic rise in the number of people taking flight from their homes and from their homelands, because of wars and terrorist attacks, in many cases caused by the destructive policies of the EU and of its member states.

Global economy faces major headwinds in 2016

The world economy stumbled in 2015 and only a modest improvement is projected for 2016/17 as a number of cyclical and structural headwinds persist, says the United Nations World Economic Situation and Prospects (WESP) 2016 report. Global growth is estimated at a mere 2.4% in 2015.

The Latin American Left is losing ground

Within a few weeks leftwing governments in Latin America have experienced a breath-taking decline. The Latin American (centre-) left forces suffered several strategic defeats. They occurred in the biggest Latin American economies. First in Argentina, than in Venezuela, and also in Brazil the days of an uncontested majority of left forces are definitely over now.

The World Bank's new Gender Equality strategy

14 years after their previous strategy on gender mainstreaming, the WBG has decided to develop a new Gender Equality (GE) Strategy. This briefing document presents WIDE+ critical reflections and key recommendations to enhance the new World Bank Group's (WBG) strategy on Gender Equality.

Greece: Merkel's victory - a Pyrrhic victory?

The Euro Zone Summit on 12-13 July 2015 forced the Greek Syriza-led government into accepting practically all demands of the other euro zone states. In return, the Greek government received the prospect that negotiations on renewed credit programme might commence and the vague promise that longer grace and payment periods on the Greek debt might be considered.

Greek crisis out of control

Everything is possible. The crisis has reached such a precipitating dynamics, that nobody is able to fully control the process. There might still come a last minute muddling through compromise. But there might also be insolvency and a subsequent Grexit either by accident or by intention.

Fight tax avoidance and reform investment policies

Two crucial issues are dealt with in the new World Investment Report: A fundamental reform of the international investment regime and more coherence between international tax and investment policies. According to the authors of the report there must be no contradiction between the policy imperative of taking action against tax avoidance and facilitating productive investment in sustainable development.

New labour standard for the informal economy

At its 104th conference in the first half of June, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has adopted a new international labour standard that is expected to help hundreds of millions of workers and economic units move out of informality and into the formal economy.

Rehabilitating the c word

What do the writer-activist Naomi Klein, the academic economist Thomas Piketty, the art curator Okwui Enwezor and the Catholic Pope have in common? A cosmopolitan lifestyle? Concern for humanity? A knack for controversy? All of that. But something more substantive too.

Display Next WDEV World Economy & Development [wdev.eu]

The BRICS in an age of multipolarity: sustaining strategic partnerships under difficult economic conditions

<div>Culminating in the formation of the New Development Bank (NDB), which was inaugurated at the Ufa Summit in 2015, the influence of the BRICS countries has now clearly gone beyond the economic arena, with the grouping evolving into a vital multilateral cooperation mechanism including Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America,with the potential to bring new vitality and momentum for global growth.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div>This special edition of Global Dialogue contains contributions from scholars in the BRICS countries and beyond. Authors were encouraged to explore areas in their respective fields of expertise that would contribute to our understanding of the evolving nature of cooperation within and amongst the BRICS countries.</div></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Contents:</div><div><ul><li>The BRICS in an age of multipolarity: Sustaining strategic partnerships under difficult economic conditions - Philani Mthembu</li><li>Intra-BRICS financial cooperation: Opportunities and challenges - Wang Fei</li><li>The BRICS agenda: functional co-operation between competing logics - Pooja Jain</li><li>Between dependence and autonomy: Understanding the power dynamics in Brazil–China relations -Daniel Cardoso</li><li>BRICS 2016 and IBSA’s ‘Three Blind Mice’ -&nbsp; Francis Kornegay Jr</li><li>New economy and participation society: A general outline of the issue, formation of approaches in the BRICS countries and their promotion in the information space - Vadim V. Balytnikov</li><li>Current political and legal issues of international commercial arbitration: Globalisation of economy vs glocalisation of law - Aleksey Kartsov</li><li>Youth participation in the BRICS Youth Summits - Sarisha Daya</li><li>Book Review: The End of American World Order by Amitav Acharya - Siphamandla Zondi </li><li>Interview with Prof. Godfrey Netswera, head of the South African BRICS Think Tank (SABTT)</li></ul></div>

23 Mar 2017 11:42:27 GMT

South African banks footprint in SADC mining projects: environmental, social and governance principles

<p><br />Environmental,&nbsp; social&nbsp; and&nbsp; governance&nbsp; (ESG)&nbsp; concerns&nbsp; are&nbsp; an&nbsp; increasingly&nbsp; important&nbsp; factor worldwide for banks when they invest in large projects. In the Southern African region with its rich mineral deposits, this trend has added importance. Mining companies extract minerals from the ground, and their activities routinely give rise to public concerns about the pollution of water sources, adequate land for agriculture, and fair community participation in mining projects. South African law accepts that the directors of corporations such as banks have fiduciary obligations to act in the best interests of shareholders.<br /><br />Given the importance of mining activity to economies in Southern Africa an important question aligned to this fiduciary duty is this: Are banks when conducting business obliged to act in the best interests of stakeholders affected by the activities of the mining companies they fund? The trite response is that banks have recognised their obligations to communities through their commitment to SRI (socially responsible investment) practices and internal ESG processes that ensure that their funding decisions result in no harm to communities.</p><p>This paper sets out to critically consider the effectiveness of ESG principles implemented by South Africa’s banks when they fund mining projects in the SADC region. There are internal differences&nbsp; in&nbsp; ESG&nbsp; principles&nbsp; between&nbsp; banks,&nbsp; and&nbsp; a&nbsp; variety&nbsp; of&nbsp; funding&nbsp; methods&nbsp; to&nbsp; which&nbsp; the principles&nbsp; are&nbsp; applied. The study evaluates the ESG frameworks used by each bank and, given the significant market share, aggregates this information to present a picture of the effectiveness of&nbsp; these&nbsp; frameworks. The approach taken is a critical one, meaning that what is presented in bank annual reports and sustainability reports is not merely accepted, but (to the extent possible) internal ESG risk frameworks are interrogated for adequacy of application by banks when funding mining&nbsp; projects. The effectiveness of the implementation of internal ESG&nbsp; procedures&nbsp; by banks is then measured against available evidence. This evidence includes the effects of mine project&nbsp; funding&nbsp; decisions&nbsp; of&nbsp; banks&nbsp; on&nbsp; ESG&nbsp; categories&nbsp; as&nbsp; ascertained&nbsp; from&nbsp; public&nbsp; information. &nbsp;<br /><br />After consideration of the evidence, observations and conclusions are provided on the analysis. In the closing section, recommendations are provided on areas for possible focus to improve the effectiveness of ESG principles used by banks in the SADC region.</p>

23 Mar 2017 10:58:34 GMT

Mineral governance barometer - Southern Africa

<p>Southern Africa is endowed with lucrative mineral resources such as diamonds, gold, copper, coal, platinum, and uranium.&nbsp; This rich endowment can be a major asset in the quest for inclusive and sustainable development, yet mining in Southern Africa has often been criticised as an enclave sector that at best contributes little to economic development and at worst does substantial social and environmental harm.&nbsp; To avoid such pitfalls emerging international consensus emphasises the importance of good mineral governance. This involves the adoption and implementation of regulatory frameworks that promote deeper linkages between the mining sector and the broader economy, and that protect people and the environment from the potentially harmful consequences of mineral extraction.<br /><br />This pilot study provides a barometer of mineral governance in ten Southern African countries: Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Namibia, South&nbsp; Africa,&nbsp; Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The barometer takes stock of mining regulations in place at the end of 2015, the extent to which they are implemented, and features of supporting institutions.&nbsp; It is based on the observation that while regulations impose obligations on mining companies, in doing so they directly impose obligations on the state to monitor and enforce compliance, and they also indirectly impose obligations for citizens and civil society to hold the state and mining companies accountable.&nbsp; The barometer includes indicators of mineral governance&nbsp; across&nbsp; four&nbsp; main&nbsp; issue-areas:&nbsp; national&nbsp; economic&nbsp; and&nbsp; fiscal&nbsp; linkages;&nbsp; community&nbsp; impact; labour, and the environment, with artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) treated as a special topic.&nbsp; The barometer also includes indicators of state capacity and state accountability with respect to mineral governance.</p>

23 Mar 2017 10:35:35 GMT

Young women and work in Nigeria: how young women, including those with disabilities, can be supported to find employment and earn an income

<p>While the current Nigerian government’s commitment to youth employment is evident in the investments being made&nbsp; through these youth employment and empowerment programmes, this study provides further evidence that such schemes lack a gender analysis&nbsp; and responsiveness, which combined with&nbsp; other issues, affect such programmes’ transparency, operational effectiveness, politicisation&nbsp; and&nbsp; impact.<br /><br />While young women appreciate and are benefiting from some of the higher quality programmes, there is limited evidence of impact and sustainable increases in employment and income&nbsp; earning. In particular, youth employment and empowerment programmes often suffer from poor design, targeting, implementation and monitoring.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>This report presents findings from a qualitative study commission by the Nigeria Stability and Reconciliation Programme&nbsp; (NSRP), exploring the extent to which government youth employment and empowerment programmes are targeting, reaching and working for young women, with a particular focus on the most prominent federal level programmes including the Subsidy Reinvestment and Empowerment Programme (SURE-P); Youth Enterprise with Innovation in Nigeria Programme (YouWIN!); Youth Employment and Social Support&nbsp; Operation (YESSO); Vocational Skills Development (VSD); and Growing Girls and Women in Nigeria (G-WIN).&nbsp;&nbsp; <br /><br />The study focuses on the experiences of young women, including those with physical disabilities, in rural and semi-urban areas in three of NSRP’s target states:&nbsp; Kaduna (Middle&nbsp; Belt), Kano (North-west) and Rivers States (South-South).</p>

23 Mar 2017 04:01:10 GMT

Do electoral handouts affect voting behavior?

<div>The literature on vote-buying often assumes a complete transaction of cash for votes. While there is ample evidence that candidates target certain voters with cash handouts, it is unclear whether these actually result in higher turnout and vote shares for the distributing party. <br /><br />Empirically, using different matching techniques and accounting for district-level factors, the authors find that cash handouts have little to no effect on either turnout or vote shares during the 2011 presidential election in Benin. They cross-validate these results with additional surveys from four other African countries (Kenya, Mali, Botswana, and Uganda). Results suggest that vote-buying is better explained as an incomplete transaction between candidates and voters and that handouts from multiple parties as well as district-level traits (e.g. patronage, public goods) may account for the null effects observed.</div>

23 Mar 2017 03:25:40 GMT

Lessons from Rwanda: female political representation and women’s rights

<div>Gender equality is a basic human right that entails equal opportunities for men and women in all facets of life: socially, economically, developmentally and politically. According to the Beijing Platform for Action, without the active participation of women in and the incorporation of their perspectives at all levels of decision-making, the goals of equality, development and peace cannot be achieved.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>This paper sets out to examine the increased female representation in Rwanda’s Parliament to determine whether it has affected women in other spheres of life. It also provides an overview of the current status of women in African politics, as well as of the current governance situation in Rwanda.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>It is clear that Rwanda has made significant efforts to elevate the status of women in its post-genocide society. However, it is also important to recognise Parliament’s limitations in an increasingly authoritarian system of governance. While women members of Parliament have passed legislation to empower women in society, a lack of information and education prevents many from taking advantage of new opportunities. Yet Rwanda is clearly on the right path towards improving its gender parity and must uphold its efforts to do so, while prioritising formal education for girls and women at all levels.</div>

16 Mar 2017 03:50:33 GMT

Public trust in elections: the role of media freedom and election management autonomy

<div>As multiparty elections have become a global norm, scholars and policy experts regard public trust in elections as vital for regime legitimacy. However, very few cross-national studies have examined the consequences of electoral manipulation, including the manipulation of election administration and the media, on citizens’ trust in elections.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>This paper addresses this gap by exploring how autonomy of election management bodies (EMBs) and media freedom individually and conjointly shape citizens’ trust in elections. Citizens are more likely to express confidence in elections when EMBs display de facto autonomy and less likely to do so when mass media disseminate information independent of government control. Additionally, the authors suggest that EMB autonomy may not have a positive effect on public trust in elections if media freedom is low. Empirical findings based on recent survey data on public trust in elections in 47 countries and expert data on de facto EMB autonomy and media freedom support our hypotheses.</div>

16 Mar 2017 03:22:03 GMT

Agriculture, Food Systems, and Nutrition: Meeting the Challenge

<div class="t m1 x5 hb y5b ff3 fs8 fc1 sc0 ls5 ws0">Malnutrition is a global challenge with huge social and economic costs; nearly every country faces a public health challenge, whether from undernutrition, overweight/obesity, and/or micronutrient deficiencies. Malnutrition is a multisectoral, multi-level problem that results from the complex interplay between household and individual decision-making, agri-food, health, and environmental systems that determine access to services and resources, and related policy processes. <br /><br />This paper reviews the theory and recent qualitative evidence (particularly from 2010 to 2016) in the public health and nutrition literature, on the role that agriculture plays in improving nutrition, how food systems are changing rapidly due to globalization, trade liberalization, and urbanization, and the implications this has for nutrition globally. <br /><br />The paper ends by summarizing recommendations that emerge from this research related to (i) knowledge, evidence, and communications, (ii) politics, governance, and policy, and (iii) capacity, leadership, and financing.</div>

14 Mar 2017 04:50:12 GMT

A practical agenda to reducing technical barriers to trade in SADC

<p>Technical regulations refer to product and process specifications, whether voluntary (standards) or legally required (compulsory specifications).</p><p>This policy brief provides context for technical regulation in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. It then offers some cross-cutting solutions for developing monitoring mechanisms that can allow policymakers to identify problem areas, and some specific interventions for the Standards, Accreditation and Metrology functions that can build capacity at low cost. It provides some recommendations for a practical agenda on reducing Technical Barriers to Trade (TBTs) in the SADC – ones that can be executed with minimal cost, and that improve the institutional capacity of regional organisations to grapple with the complexity inherent to the field. Above all, these regulations will need to be carefully attuned to assure that they provide the maximum protection for the region from dangerous substandard imports, while still allowing for a dynamic, mutually beneficial trading relationship.</p><p>Technical regulation cannot create jobs, but it is a vital underpinning for the type of policies that drive regional integration and create industrial jobs. As it stands, Southern Africa’s technical regulation is developing too fast, with too few controls to ensure that it is directed towards developmental purposes. Capacity expansion that simply results in ever more standards being churned out increases complexity, <br />but not quality. Practical interventions that create supporting mechanisms – such as monitoring systems, or assistance for firms seeking accreditation – are essential to creating a development-focused regional technical infrastructure.</p>

14 Mar 2017 02:19:31 GMT

Electricity supply in South Africa: Path dependency or decarbonisation?

<p>Renewable energy technologies have experienced an exponential growth in South Africa, thanks to the procurement of large-scale power plants. However, South Africa’s electricity sector still lacks a level playing field. Significant vested interests have maintained overwhelming support for centralised, coal-based electricity generation, preventing the development of renewable energy technologies to their optimal potential. Active efforts are required to enhance the transformation of electricity supply in the country by truly incorporating the low-carbon transition in electricity planning, opening the policy space for the development of embedded generation, and phasing out fossil fuel subsidies.</p><p>The electricity sector in South Africa is a highly contested space. The emergence of renewable energy technologies (along with energy efficiency and other demand-side management opportunities) has generated healthy revitalisation and disturbance of the status quo in the industry. Discussions around other technologies, such as gas-to-power and nuclear energy, are also adding to this vibrant dynamics. Significant vested interests are still at play alongside massive state support to maintain the domination of the coal industry over the electricity supply industry in South Africa. <br /><br />Active efforts are required to provide a level playing field for all energy technologies and enhance the transformation of electricity supply in the country. This includes truly incorporating the low-carbon transition in electricity planning, open the policy space for the development of embedded generation and phase out fossil fuel subsidies.</p>

14 Mar 2017 02:06:58 GMT

Making tax work for women’s rights

<p>Tax and women’s rights are entwined. How tax is spent and raised matters more for women than men. And there is lots of potential for tax to bring about positive change in women’s lives – at the moment, developing countries give away massive unnecessary corporate tax breaks while services that women need struggle for funding, while at the same time tax could be raised more progressively.</p>

03 Mar 2017 12:55:27 GMT

Shifting power: learning from women’s experiences and approaches to reducing inequality

<p>Shifting Power is based on focus group discussions and interviews in communities in seven developing and emerging economy countries where ActionAid is active: Brazil, Haiti, Liberia, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda. Groups of women were asked how they experience inequality and, most importantly, how they are addressing inequality. The report finds that across the countries, when women take collective action on the many challenges facing them, they feel better equipped to address inequalities within their families and communities. This process is often accelerated for women whose first meetings are around income generating activities, while women who are economically autonomous tend to be more involved in organising.</p>

03 Mar 2017 12:51:56 GMT

Digital financial solutions to advance women’s economic participation: How governments, private sector and development organizations can bring more women into the global economy through digital financial services

<p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: small;">This report outlines the role of digital financial services in improving women’s economic participation, the challenges of increasing women’s access to digital financial services, and the opportunities governments and other sectors have to foster an inclusive global economy in which digital financial services are widely available to everyone, especially women.</span></p>

03 Mar 2017 12:48:07 GMT

Resilient markets: strengthening women’s economic empowerment and market systems in fragile settings

<p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: small;">Women’s economic empowerment in fragile contexts is vital to building the coping strategy of individuals, markets and other market actors to manage crisis and risk. However, to best support women to survive and thrive through crisis, interventions have to target the whole market system, and the roles and relationships within each contextual market system, before and during crises, in order to smooth the transition to longer-term recovery.</span></p>

03 Mar 2017 12:44:36 GMT

How inclusive is inclusive business for women? Examples from Asia and Latin America

<p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: small;">This report takes stock of 104 inclusive business investments active in 2015 supported by th Asian Development Bank (ADB), Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the International Finance Corperation (IFC),&nbsp;and examines 13 of these companies, in depth,&nbsp;on how they contribute to women’s economic empowerment. It shows that there are only a few inclusive business models that explicitly promote gender empowerment. And while there are many social enterprise initiatives and corporate social responsibility activities promoting gender-related issues, these projects remain small in scale and impact. The report also highlights that addressing gender-based constraints yields business benefits, and effective outcomes demand concerted action. </span></p>

03 Mar 2017 12:08:25 GMT

Display Next Eldis Development News [eldis.org]

Korea needs to put green growth vision into action

Korea has improved access to environmental services and become a world leader in climate change mitigation technology.

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Webinar: Behavioural Insights - Changing Human Behaviour for Green Growth

Join the GGKP for a webinar on Wednesday, March 8 from 15:00-16:30 (CET) exploring evidence-based research on how behavioural science can further resource efficiency and sustainable consumption.

Wed, 08 Mar 2017 15:00:00 GMT

Estonia should reduce its oil shale reliance for greener growth

Estonia needs to move faster to reduce its dependence on oil shale so it can advance towards a greener economy and reduce air pollution and waste generation, according to a new OECD report.

Wed, 01 Mar 2017 11:00:00 GMT

OECD Network on Agricultural Total Factor Productivity and the Environment

The OECD Network on Agricultural Total Factor Productivity and the Environment convenes experts from relevant countries to facilitate dialogue and, where possible, co-operative research efforts that aim to develop a better framework for cross-country total factor productivity comparisons.

Tue, 28 Feb 2017 17:03:00 GMT

Pollution havens? Energy prices are not key drivers of offshoring

New evidence on the effect of energy prices on outward FDI can provide some reassurance in light of concerns about Pollution Havens.

Mon, 06 Feb 2017 15:26:00 GMT

Green investment banks

To leverage the impact of relatively limited public resources, over a dozen national and sub-national governments have created public green investment banks (GIBs) and GIB-like entities.

Tue, 31 Jan 2017 11:23:00 GMT

Call for Papers: Fifth Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP) Annual Conference on Sustainable Infrastructure

The Fifth GGKP Annual Conference will be hosted by the World Bank on the topic of sustainable infrastructure, to stimulate research on these issues and foster interdisciplinary dialogue where relevant.The scientific committee therefore calls for contributions on any aspect of the infrastructure agenda, particularly for developing countries, with a focus on sustainability. Deadline for preliminary versions by 15 June 2017.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 11:06:00 GMT

Pesca y acuicultura en Colombia

Este informe preparado por la OCDE apoya la revisión de Colombia asumida por el comité de pesca de la OCDE como parte del proceso de acceso de Colombia a la OCDE. Esta es la traducción al español del reporte original.

Tue, 17 Jan 2017 11:59:00 GMT

OECD Green Growth Newsletter

Read our latest December edition and all previous issues of the newsletter. The December issue draws your attention to the OECD work on Mainstreaming Biodiversity, highlights recent Green Growth news such as the launch of GGKP’s BIG-E Database and Georgia’s adherence to the OECD Green Growth Declaration. It also highlights the OECD’s most recent publications.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 16:18:00 GMT

Increased investment in renewable energy is key to spur sustainable growth in Emerging Asia

Despite a challenging global environment, the growth prospects of Emerging Asia (Southeast Asia, China and India) remain robust over the medium term, according to the latest edition of the OECD Development Centre’s Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 09:00:00 GMT

Georgia adheres to the OECD Declaration on Green Growth

There are now 45 Adherents to the 2009 OECD Declaration on Green Growth. Georgia has joined Costa Rica, Colombia, Croatia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru, Tunisia, as well as OECD members in having adhered to the Declaration.

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 15:58:00 GMT

Green Growth and Sustainable Development Forum 2016

This year's Green Growth and Sustainable Development Forum (GGSD Forum) focuses on the theme “Urban green growth, spatial planning and land-use”. Land use and spatial planning policies have implications for both the environment and the economy. Overall, consideration will be given to the potential for regional, rural and urban policy to contribute to green growth.

Wed, 09 Nov 2016 11:32:00 GMT

Urban green growth is about asking the right questions at the right time - Insights Blog

Are you a city-dweller, concerned about the challenges of urbanisation, resilience and inclusiveness? Cities and urban areas represent unrivalled concentrations of people, economic growth, commercial networks, and innovation – and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the transition towards a low-carbon world.

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 13:23:00 GMT

Webinar: Unlocking Green Growth Potential: Experiences from Colombia and Peru

Join the GGKP for a webinar on 1 November from 3:00pm - 4:30pm (Geneva time) to learn more about the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)'s Green Growth Potential Assessment (GGPA) tool which helps countries find ways to turn risks into green growth opportunities, and the ways in which it has been applied to unlock green growth potential in Colombia and Peru.

Tue, 01 Nov 2016 15:00:00 GMT

Indonesia, open government and the SDGs

"Indonesia is well placed to be a strong advocate for open government reforms, and to link such reforms to other multi-lateral reform efforts" - OECD Insights Blog by Luiz De Mello.

Tue, 25 Oct 2016 10:50:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Sustainable Development [oecd.org]

International trade statistics: trends in fourth quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade growth picks up in Q4 2016

Tue, 28 Feb 2017 16:28:00 GMT

Forthcoming release of new Trade in Value-Added (TiVA) data in 2017/2018

In Q1 2017 there will be a "light" update of the TiVA/ICIO introducing two new countries, Morocco and Peru and in Q1 2018 a "major" update will occur.

Tue, 20 Dec 2016 15:05:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in third quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade growth remains sluggish in Q3 2016

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 17:25:00 GMT

Monitoring investment and trade measures

G20 Leaders are firmly committed to open trade and investment and to resisting protectionism in all its forms. They have mandated WTO, OECD and UNCTAD – the leading international organisations in the area of international trade and investment policies – to monitor policy developments and report publicly on these commitments.

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 10:49:00 GMT

OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría welcomes the signature of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA)

“I congratulate Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau, President of the European Council Donald Tusk, and President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker on the signature of the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA). The deal comes at a crucial time when slowing trade growth and low investment are contributing to the weakness of the global economy.

Mon, 31 Oct 2016 18:36:00 GMT

Green shoots of recovery in entrepreneurship beginning to appear

The post-crisis recovery in entrepreneurial activity remains mixed across countries, but new data released today by the OECD provides tentative signs of a turning point, with trends in enterprise creation rates pointing upwards in most economies.

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 14:00:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in second quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade in Q2 2016 shows first modest growth since early 2014

Tue, 30 Aug 2016 17:25:00 GMT

OECD Workshop on Greening Regional Trade Agreements: Opportunities and Insights from International Experience

The OECD will convene its 6th Workshop on Regional trade agreements and the environment on 10 June 2016, at the OECD Headquarters. The focus of the workshop will be on chapters of regional trade agreement (RTAs) that are concerned mainly with issues other than the environment, such as market access, investment, or government procurement, TBT, regulatory coherence or dispute settlement.

Fri, 10 Jun 2016 15:03:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in first quarter 2016

Slowdown in global merchandise trade accelerates in Q1 2016

Tue, 31 May 2016 08:32:00 GMT

Business brief: The ascendancy of digital trade: A new world order?

We are so used to all things digital that we can sometimes lose sight of just how enormous the phenomenon has become, and how disruptive it can be.

Thu, 26 May 2016 16:37:00 GMT

World trade: Why ministers must act

Creeping protectionism is alive and well. Last year’s monitoring report on trade for the G20 reminded us that of the nearly 1,500 trade-restrictive measures imposed by G20 countries since 2008, fewer than 400 have been removed. The stock of these barriers continues to grow, despite a pledge by the G20 to reduce protectionism.

Wed, 25 May 2016 18:48:00 GMT

Multiplication of Environmental Labelling and Information Schemes (ELIS): Implications for Environment and Trade - Environment Working Paper

This report explores potential effects of the recent rapid growth in Environmental Labelling Information Schemes (ELIS) around the world, with a focus on the implications of ELIS multiplication for environmental effectiveness and international trade.

Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:26:00 GMT

A Review of Public Policies relating to the Use of Environmental Labelling and Information Schemes (ELIS) - Environment Working Paper

This report provides a brief review of how national government policies and guidelines apply to or regulate the use of environmental labelling and information schemes (ELIS) in selected OECD countries. The report reviews definitions relevant to environmental claims and identifies four types of potentially false or misleading environmental claims.

Sat, 23 Apr 2016 08:16:00 GMT

Global trade in fake goods worth nearly half a trillion dollars a year - OECD & EUIPO

Imports of counterfeit and pirated goods are worth nearly half a trillion dollars a year, or around 2.5% of global imports, with US, Italian and French brands the hardest hit and many of the proceeds going to organised crime, according to a new report by the OECD and the EU’s Intellectual Property Office.

Mon, 18 Apr 2016 12:00:00 GMT

Trade facilitation and integrity go hand in hand? More than you think - OECD Insights blog

Is there a role for trade liberalisation and facilitation in zeroing in on corruption and supporting integrity in trade? Yes – and a greater one than you might think.

Fri, 08 Apr 2016 13:46:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Trade [oecd.org]

Employment

LanguageEnglishFrenchSpanish . EFSVL Team Leader (INT3347)

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <h2><span>The Role</span></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>To provide technical support and quality control in emergency food security and vulnerable livelihood interventions related to the Mosul humanitarian response, including needs assessments, programme design and implementation, and the monitoring and evaluation of Oxfam&rsquo;s EFS-VL emergency response in Mosul, Iraq. Response locations in Iraq include Erbil, Dohuk, Ninewa and Salah El Din.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>About the MECIS Region</strong></span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>The Middle East and Commonwealth of Independent States (MECIS) region implements and manages programmes in&nbsp;Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Jordan, Russia, Tajikistan, Armenia, and Georgia.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Programmes within the MECIS region reflect Oxfam&rsquo;s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our campaigning.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>We also put women at the heart of all we do. The majority of people living in poverty are women and girls, and so this focus helps us to achieve our mission to overcome poverty and suffering.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>Useful Information</strong></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Contract Length</strong>:&nbsp;6 months, with possibility for extension</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span><strong>Benefits</strong>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span><strong>Salary:</strong> It is Oxfam&rsquo;s policy to hire at the minimum to middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span><strong>The Candidate:</strong><em>&nbsp;</em>This role is open to both national and non nationals.&nbsp; Successful candidates who will be required to relocate internationally to take up the role will be provided with a competitive international relocation package.</span></p> <p><br /><span><strong>Due to the urgency of this role, we will be reviewing CVs and interviewing candidate in advance of the closing date. For this reason, interested candidates are asked to submit their application as soon as possible.</strong></span></p> </div> </div>

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 10:02:39 GMT

Emergency Food Security and Vulnerable Livelihood Coordinator (INT3365)

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>The Role:</strong></span></p> <p><span>As EFSVL Coordinator you will&nbsp;analyse the situation, assess vulnerabilities of the affected population and the humanitarian context and provide strategic steer to the team and partners for planning and implementing effective emergency food security and sustainable livelihoods programme of Oxfam in Yemen.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>About the MECIS Region</strong></span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>The Middle East and Commonwealth of Independent States (MECIS) region implements and manages programmes in&nbsp;Yemen, Occupied Palestinian Territories, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, Jordan, Russia, Tajikistan, Armenia, and Georgia.</span></p> <p><span>Programmes within the MECIS region reflect Oxfam&rsquo;s approach to work across the globe. We support self-reliance, not dependency, and to complement our work on the ground we strive to secure lasting change through our campaigning.</span></p> <p><span>We also put women at the heart of all we do. The majority of people living in poverty are women and girls, and so this focus helps us to achieve our mission to overcome poverty and suffering.</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><strong><span>&nbsp;Useful Information:</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Contract Length</strong>:&nbsp;2 years</span></p> <p><span><strong>Benefits</strong>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Due to the urgency of this role, we will be reviewing CVs and interviewing candidate in advance of the closing date. For this reason, interested candidates are asked to submit their application as soon as possible.</strong></span></p> </div> </div>

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 10:02:03 GMT

Senior Trachoma Adviser

<ul> <li><strong>Are you a Trachoma expert, with strong program development and technical expertise</strong></li> <li><strong>Make a difference as a dynamic member of our International Programs Team</strong></li> <li><strong>Full time, 12 month maternity leave cover</strong></li> </ul> <p style="text-align: justify;">Come and join our international development organisation where we are ensuring that the vision of Fred Hollows lives on.&nbsp; We are working to end avoidable blindness by 2020, and are committed to working with partners to bring about change that is sustainable and reaches the most vulnerable communities.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">This is an exciting opportunity for a public health professional with expertise in Trachoma Elimination programs. The Senior Trachoma Advisor will provide The Foundation&rsquo;s country programs with strategic guidance and technical support for achieving program goals and for improving the quality and effectiveness of our trachoma elimination efforts. This role will also be accountable for facilitating coordination and learning across the key trachoma elimination programs within The Fred Hollows Foundation.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">You will have relevant tertiary qualifications and at least eight years&rsquo; experience in international public health or development, including experience developing and delivering programs for the elimination of Trachoma or Neglected Tropical Diseases. &nbsp;You will have experience in program cycle management, including the development of theories of change and monitoring, evaluation and learning frameworks. &nbsp;You will have experience managing donor grants and possess the ability to identify and develop risk minimization strategies to ensure program outcomes are met. You will have excellent written and interpersonal skills, with the ability to communicate professionally at all levels, across donors, partners, and management. Critical to your success will be your positive and self-motivated approach, as well as organisational and time management skills to ensure you manage conflicting deadlines.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>This role will require international travel. We are flexible about where we locate this position, but frequent travel to Eastern Africa will be an essential requirement.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>How to apply and who to contact.</strong></p> <p style="text-align: left;">For a detailed Job Description and for information on how to apply, please visit our website <strong><a href="http://www.hollows.org/au/careers/current-vacancies">http://www.hollows.org/au/careers/current-vacancies</a>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Alternatively, if you would like further information please contact our Recruitment Specialist Nicole Cunningham on +61 2 8741 1962 or Lynette Chen on +61 2 8741 1969 or via email at <strong><a href="mailto:employment@hollows.org">employment@hollows.org</a></strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><strong>Applications close: 9th April 2017</strong></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>&nbsp;</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>The Fred Hollows Foundation is committed to protecting the rights of children in all areas where we work.&nbsp; Applicants are advised that The&nbsp;</em><em>Foundation reserves the right to conduct police checks and other screening procedures to ensure we maintain and promote a child safe e</em><em>nvironment.</em></p>

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:25:34 GMT

Events intern at Alive and Kicking

<div> <p><strong><a href="http://www.aliveandkicking.org/">Alive and Kicking</a> is a UK charity and social enterprise that works in sub-Saharan Africa </strong>to create ethical employment for African communities, improve the health and quality of life of disadvantaged young people, and help children exercise their right to play. We do this by manufacturing sports balls, running health programmes, and donating balls to children.</p> <p><strong>We&rsquo;re looking for an enthusiastic intern to help us organise and run our fundraising events and help with general admin in our UK store in Hoxton. </strong>We will offer a daily allowance for lunch and travel.</p> <p><strong>Main tasks</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><em>Events</em></p> <ul> <li>Assist with the organisation of events (including a comedy night, 5-a-side corporate football tournament). This will include:</li> </ul> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Liaising with acts, donors, guests for the comedy night and captains for the 5-a-side</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Finding and securing prizes for auctions and raffles</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Assisting with the running of the events on the night</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Assisting with administration and implementation of fundraising events and activities including thank you letters</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Website and social media</em></p> <ul> <li>Produce content for the website, Facebook and Twitter</li> <li>Edit images for us on website and in other publications</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Office and shop administration</em></p> <ul> <li>Serve walk-in customers in our Hoxton store</li> <li>Process online orders and arrange for delivery of balls</li> <li>Maintain basic stock records</li> <li>Assist with basic bookkeeping duties and filing</li> <li>General administration and other reasonable duties in support of the Alive and Kicking team</li> <li>Update and maintain records on the supporter database</li> </ul> <div> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> <p><strong>Benefits </strong></p> <ul> <li>Opportunity to gain experience of events, marketing, and develop project management skills</li> <li>Gain a thorough understanding of the processes involved in running an international charity</li> <li>Flexible hours - if you need time off that can be arranged</li> <li>References gladly given to successful candidate</li> </ul> <p><strong><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Personal Specification</strong></p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" align="left"> <tbody> <tr> <td valign="top" width="149"> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="255"> <p><strong>Essential</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="212"> <p><strong>Desirable</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="149"> <p><strong>Skills/experience</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="255"> <ul> <li>Good written and verbal communication</li> <li>Ability to build and maintain effective working relationships with staff and supporters</li> <li>A&nbsp; self-starter, able to work proactively and resourcefully in a small team</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top" width="212"> <ul> <li>Experience of organising events</li> <li>Fundraising experience</li> <li>Working knowledge of maintaining supporter database</li> <li>Experience of writing funding approaches for Trusts/Foundations or companies</li> <li>Strong IT skills</li> <li>PR/marketing experience</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" width="149"> <p><strong>Personal qualities</strong></p> </td> <td valign="top" width="255"> <ul> <li>Excellent telephone manner</li> <li>Strong desire to gain experience in events or the charity sector</li> <li>Energetic and enthusiastic with a willingness to undertake any task required in a small office</li> <li>Confidence in representing the charity at events, meetings or on the phone.</li> <li>Interest in the field of international development and social enterprise</li> <li>Able to commute to our space in Hoxton</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> <td valign="top" width="212"> <ul> <li>Willingness to undertake occasional evening or weekend work</li> </ul> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div>

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 11:33:34 GMT

Specialist for Organic Program Development

<p>IFOAM &ndash; Organics International is calling for a full time</p> <p><strong><em>Specialist for Organic Program Development</em></strong></p> <p>in its <em>Capacity Development</em> department.</p> <p>Sustainability in agriculture is an unsolved challenge despite growing evidence of the need for a paradigm shift towards new production systems that put ecological resources, rural societies, cultural expressions, public social welfare and the economic viability of smallholder family farming in the foreground. Organic Agriculture offers solutions that can contribute to sustainable development in rural areas.</p> <p>IFOAM &ndash; Organics International believes that agriculture - done differently &ndash; can be part of the solution. Organic agriculture &ndash; a dynamic and continuously developing farming system based on the science of agro-ecology &ndash; is a forerunner of truly sustainable agriculture and offers practical solutions to address major global challenges.</p> <p>It has about 800 affiliates in nearly 120 countries and also acts as a Global Action Network with numerous allies. Its values are based on the four principles of health, ecology, fairness and care.</p> <p>IFOAM &ndash; Organics International leads change &ndash; organically. The three departments work on:</p> <p>a)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Enhancing knowledge, skills and attitudes of producers and value chain actors (Capacity Development department);</p> <p>b)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Stimulating demand for sustainable products by raising awareness; and</p> <p>c)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Advocacy for a policy environment that is conducive to truly sustainable production and consumption.</p> <p>The<em> Capacity Development </em>department is contributing to asituation where know-how and systems are improved and spread in order for operators to farm, process and market in a truly sustainable way.Our projects seek to strengthen stakeholders and improve the livelihoods of vulnerable households in need of innovation and adaptation, challenged by food insecurity, biodiversity loss, climate change, the depletion of natural resources and economic shocks.</p> <p>Holistic, people-centered approaches with a focus on enhanced food systems (sustainable production and consumption) leading to a more balanced diet &ndash; particularly for women and children &ndash; and market-oriented value chain facilitation form the backbone of our work towards poverty alleviation.</p> <p>The Specialist for Organic Program Development is responsible for the development, implementation and evaluation of projects predominantly in the global South and participates in the overall program development. He/she reports to the Program Manager.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>QUALIFICATIONS and EXPERIENCE </strong></p> <p>We are looking for an experienced specialist with at least 10 years of relevant experience and with proven skills in programs strategy development, project acquisition, implementation, monitoring and evaluation in low-income countries among others in Africa. The position requires the following key competencies:</p> <ul> <li>Sound knowledge of Organic Agriculture and its challenges globally, particularly in low-income countries, combined with a high level of commitment to and passion for true sustainability in agriculture;</li> <li>Knowledge of recent trends in development cooperation and experience in rural development, including agriculture, processing, market access, organic sector building and natural resource management for poverty alleviation and diversified nutrition; ? ?</li> <li>Sharp and smart strategy and impact chain development for convincing project concepts, planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Strong ability to recognize and integrate opportunities that can offer effective outcomes on both shoestring budgets and complex, well-funded activities; ?</li> <li>First-hand experience (including in Africa) in planning and implementing of international projects in a complex environment, cooperating with partner organizations, private businesses and public bodies; ?</li> <li>Exceptional fundraising capabilities, which includes networking, proposal development and a drive to deliver on commitments; ?</li> <li>Excellent social and intercultural communication skills. Ability to build capacity with participatory approaches and to gain trust and respect of allies and partners; ?</li> <li>Fluency in spoken and written English, French and German. Knowledge of additional languages (e.g., Spanish, Mandarin or Russian) is an added-value; ?</li> <li>Willingness to contribute to a culture of open dialogue and constructive, mutual feedback as part of a diverse team; ?</li> <li>Sound organizational skills including the management of budget, staff, consortium partner relationships, volunteers and assets. Professional, hands-on and outcome-oriented working style, capable of achieving fast progress in complex and parallel multi- stakeholder processes; ? <ul> <li>Excellent self-management skills including time, deadlines and task management, priority setting and self-motivation.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>?<strong>Details of the position: </strong>?This challenging, full-time position will be based at our head office in Bonn, Germany in an attractive geographical and institutional setting and provide the opportunity for international travel. The salary is competitive, in line with similar international non-profit organizations and commensurate with experience, skills and performance.</p> <p><strong>Application Instructions: </strong>?Please submit a full CV, letter of motivation, salary expectations and the contact details of two references, all in one PDF document to Thomas Cierpka, Deputy Director, <a href="mailto:jobs@ifoam.bio">jobs@ifoam.bio</a> latest by April 30, 2017. ?Strategic and content related questions can be addressed to Barbara Zilly, Program Manager of IFOAM &ndash; Organics International. ?</p>

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 10:29:42 GMT

Education Technical Advisor

<p><strong>Contract Type:</strong>&nbsp;Fixed Term Contract (10 months with the possibility of further extensions subject to the availability of funds, satisfactory performance and the continuing need for the post).<br /><strong>Reports to:</strong>&nbsp;Emergency Response Manager / Area Manager Duhok<br /><strong>Working with:</strong><br />&bull; War Child UK Iraq country team<br />&bull; War Child UK Programme team based in London, including regional desk and technical advisors<br />&bull; Other War Child colleagues and partners<br /><strong>Location:</strong>&nbsp;Duhok, Iraq with travel to Baghdad and Erbil</p> <p><strong>Purpose of the Job</strong><br />WCUK is recruiting an Education Technical Advisor to bring technical expertise and input to its current and planned programmes in Iraq. Currently, WCUK is running an informal education project in Ninewa Governorate in Iraq, and over the coming months the programme will significantly expand its education programming in other locations.</p> <p>The Education Technical Advisor will support the development and delivery of War Child UK&rsquo;s education programme, provide strategic input in clusters and design education projects relevant to the context in KRI and Iraq in general. This will include Education in Emergencies but not limited to it. Leading WCUK&rsquo;s engagement with the Ministry of Education at different levels and the relevant coordination forums, the Advisor will position War Child UK in Iraq to be seen as a strategic partner in improving access and quality of education for children in Iraq. The Advisor will split their time between the various educational programmes in Iraq, ensuring high quality technical input at all stages of the programme cycle.</p> <p><strong>Key Roles and Responsibilities</strong><br />Technical input, content development and training (50%)<br />&bull; Identify needs and provide technical assistance and training to Project Officers, field staff and partners in the preparation, roll-out and implementation of education-focused programmes.<br />&bull; Work with Ministry of Education and other technical partners involved in the education programme.<br />&bull; Review, revise and update existing Learning Support materials ahead of future implementation.<br />&bull; Provide on-going technical advice to all Education programmatic technical staff and local partners when required.<br />&bull; Ensure proactive technical coordination and collaboration among implementing partners;<br />&bull; Train project and partner staff on education methodologies, best practices and relevant standards related to education programme delivery.<br />&bull; Oversee the quality of the programme activities, through technical support extended to service delivery.</p> <p>Result: War Child UK education programmes in Iraq are of high quality and implemented by competent and well trained staff.</p> <p><strong>External representation and liaison (25%)</strong><br />&bull; Ensure technical buy-in and support from all stakeholders including the Ministry of Education at different levels in collaboration with WCUK Iraq, WCUK teams in London, WCH global teams and EIE network.<br />&bull; Engage in technical discussions with MOE in Iraq and ensure continual Ministry buy-in to War Child UK programmes.<br />&bull; Ensure effective collaboration with the DNGO office, which oversees all NGO implemented programmes in Iraq, including inputting technical details into reports and information requested.<br />&bull; Identify important education focused findings and results and share these widely on a regular basis.<br />&bull; Represent the organisation in relevant (inter)national events, networks and sector groups related to education.<br />&bull; Regularly attend the Education Cluster meetings and other sub-groups meetings to ensure close coordination with other (I)NGOs and actors. Present key programmes and findings in the relevant forums on a periodic basis.</p> <p>Results: Various stakeholders and partners are actively and positively engaged with the projects and programme and contribute to deliver the best results possible;</p> <p><strong>Monitoring, Reporting and Learning (15%)</strong><br />&bull; Work closely with the national Monitoring &amp; Evaluation (M&amp;E) team to ensure coherence between M&amp;E approaches to successfully monitor educational outcomes, outputs and overall impact.<br />&bull; Advise and assist Project Officers and PMs on matters related to partner compliance in technical programming.<br />&bull; Prepare and review narrative reports for education technical content and education programmes.<br />&bull; Collaborate with War Child UK's London-based global Child Protection, Education-in-Emergencies and MEAL Advisors and Officers to ensure coherence of technical quality and adherence to international standards.<br />&bull; Support beneficiary accountability through complaints and feedback mechanisms<br />&bull; Develop ToR and conduct education programme evaluation.<br />&bull; Support learning from assessments and evaluations by developing learning papers through and sharing lessons learned and best practices from programmatic interventions to improve quality,<br />&bull; Increase awareness and support replication, sustainability, and expansion of project successes.</p> <p>Result: Findings and (sub) results of the Programme are shared and used for learning purposes both in War Child as well as in the educational sector.</p> <p><strong>Programme Development and Continual Improvement (10%)</strong><br />&bull; As required, identify and lead the technical design of new programme opportunities in close collaboration with the Programme Managers and relevant support staff in HQ.<br />&bull; Work closely with relevant colleagues in the programme development process including consultation with stakeholders and conducting needs assessment.<br />&bull; Design and develop quality project proposals and concept notes at short notice</p> <p>Result: Timely and appropriate funding sources are secured to cover longer term upscaling ambitions of education programmes in Iraq.</p> <p><strong>Personal Specification &ndash; Essential Criteria</strong><br />War Child&rsquo;s office is a lively and fast-paced environment made up of a team of extremely dedicated staff &amp; outreach workers. We&rsquo;re looking for someone who can fit in well and bring their creativity, dedication, professionalism and a positive attitude to the team and organisation in general.</p> <p><strong>Experience:</strong><br />&bull; University degree in disciplines relevant to the following areas: Education, Education in Emergencies, Social Sciences, or a field(s) relevant to international development assistance.<br />&bull; Several years of technical experience implementing or advising on Emergencies in Education and basic education projects in contexts similar to Iraq or Middle East.<br />&bull; Previous employment or extensive collaboration with the Iraqi Ministry of Education, national education partners and networks is an added advantage.<br />&bull; Demonstrated teaching and training design and delivery experience required, based on INEE and other international standards.<br />&bull; Expertise in areas such as Ed-tech/e-learning, teacher training, curriculum and/or educational materials development, educational management, and educational monitoring and information systems; technical knowledge in PSS/life skills is an asset.<br />&bull; Excellent command of spoken and written English.<br />&bull; Basic knowledge of Arabic / Kurdish language will be an added value.<br />&bull; If the minimum requirements are not fully met, the Human Resources may substitute part of the unmet requirements with a combination of relevant academic qualification, additional professional training and/or progressive relevant work experience. Note: Work experience alone or formal qualifications with no relevant work experience are not considered sufficient for an equivalency determination.</p> <p><strong>Key Competencies:</strong><br />&bull; Strong communication and interpersonal skills, particularly mentoring skills with a diverse team; project and budget design experience.<br />&bull; Strong writing and demonstrated critical thinking skills;<br />&bull; Monitoring and evaluation skills and experience;<br />&bull; Computer skills in MS Office (Word, Excel, Access, Outlook);<br />&bull; Strong planning and organisational skills.<br />&bull; Ability to collaborate and form effective partnerships with internal and external stakeholders.<br />&bull; Proven sound judgement, decision-making and problem solving skills with a can-do, results driven approach to work.<br />&bull; Flexibility to change and create for continuous improvement and to contribute towards a culture of innovation along with knowledge impact.<br />&bull; Positively receive feedback for performance improvement/ or inputs for improving programme design.</p> <p><strong>Desirables</strong><br />&bull; Demonstrable knowledge and experience working in education programming, specifically in Iraq;<br />&bull; Familiarity with International Education in Emergencies Standards, such as the INEE Standards and Child Protection Minimum Standards.</p> <p><strong>Conditions of Service</strong><br />Working Hours: Full Time (37.5 hours per week)<br />Probation: 3 months<br />Start date: ASAP<br />Travel: Within Iraq as required, occasional visits to the region and UK Salary: Grade 5 (&pound;35,832 to &pound;40,273) negotiable/based on relevant experience. Plus, 40 USD Per Diem/Daily living allowance when in country of post.<br />Leave: 30 days p.a. pro-rata<br />Benefits: As per War Child Terms and Conditions: Rest &amp; Recuperation, Accommodation, Emergency Travel &amp; Medical Insurance etc.</p> <p><strong>How to Apply</strong><br />&bull; Download the War Child Application Form from https://www.warchild.org.uk/who-we-are. The completed Application Form must reach War Child at recruitment@warchild.org.uk by 04 April 2017. Please note CVs will not be accepted.<br />&bull; Applications will be assessed on a rolling basis due to the urgency to fill the post. Due to limited resources, War Child HR will only contact the shortlisted candidates.<br />&bull; Any offer made post the interview will be conditional on receipt of 3 favourable written references, (from your most recent/current employer, any other previous employer and a character reference). War Child reserves the right to call the referees, in case clarification is required post the receipt of complete reference forms.<br />&bull; The successful applicant will be expected to undergo a police check from a country of permanent residence, a medical check, be compliant and sign up to War Child&rsquo;s Child Safeguarding Policy prior to a final offer being made.<br />WCUK is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages qualified female and male candidates&rsquo; backgrounds to apply.</p>

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 14:53:27 GMT

Analyst & Writer - Health Systems and Health Financing

<h1>Overview</h1> <p>ThinkWell is an emerging health systems development organization that is in a major growth phase. Determined to transcend the status quo, ThinkWell was founded in 2011 to provide bold, creative, and practical solutions to helping low- and middle-income countries achieve universal health coverage. While our core area of work is health financing, we take a &ldquo;whole-of-systems&rdquo; approach, specializing in five practice areas that intersect with health financing: governance, human resources for health, private sector, public financial management, and research and evaluation.</p> <p>ThinkWell is seeking an analyst and writer. The analyst will provide support across a range of projects focused on immunization financing, results-based financing, and family planning. S/he will be involved in research, writing, project management, and administrative tasks across multiple projects. S/he will co-lead on writing proposals, analytic papers, blogs, and articles for dissemination on ThinkWell&rsquo;s website, external sites, and at conferences and in journals. S/he will contribute to systematic reviews, cost and cost effectiveness studies, and political economy analysis.</p> <p>We are looking for full-time candidates to be based in our Washington, D.C. office. <strong>Deadline for applications is April 15, 2017.</strong></p> <h1>Responsibilities</h1> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">1&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Source data and information on relevant technical and policy issues and effectively summarize the findings;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">2&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Provide qualitative and quantitative data analysis across a range of subjects;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">3&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Co-lead desk proposal writing and research for new business development;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">4&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Develop concept notes, briefing materials, meeting summaries, and technical blog pieces;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">5&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Draft sections of donor reports and coordinate the input of other team members;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">6&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Assist with a range of project management and administrative responsibilities, including organizing meetings and workshops and coordinating travel arrangements;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">7&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Support other tasks as required.</p> <h1>Qualifications</h1> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">1&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Graduate degree in Global Health, Health Policy, Health Economics, or Health Management / Bachelor degree with minimum of 2 years of relevant work experience in international development at a research organization, academic institution, government, bilateral or multilateral development agency, consulting firm, or NGO;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">2&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Experience of living and/or working in a low-income, or lower middle income country, is highly desirable;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">3&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Native or complete fluency in written English;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">4&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Willingness to travel, including to low-income countries, essential.</p> <h1>Skills and Competencies</h1> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">1&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Exceptional problem solving and analytical capabilities;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">2&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Strong and compelling writing, editing, and oral communication skills;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">3&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Strong interpersonal skills and ability to build relationships in a challenging multicultural environment;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">4&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Ability to set priorities and to be effective in high-pressure situations;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">5&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Strong attention to detail and level of organization;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">6&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Ability to work independently and collaboratively;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">7&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Strong presentation skills;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">8&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Drive to challenge conventional wisdom;&nbsp;</p> <p class="Numberedparaslevel1">9&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Open to and empowered by critical feedback.&nbsp;</p> <h1>To Apply</h1> <p>Applications must be submitted through our online job portal: <a href="https://jobs-thinkwell.icims.com/jobs"><strong>https://jobs-thinkwell.icims.com/jobs</strong></a><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Please submit a cover letter, CV, and two writing samples. Writing samples should be no more than five pages in length but can be a subset of a longer piece. Samples should only include pieces where the applicant was the main author.&nbsp;</p>

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 14:44:38 GMT

Researcher (for MSME & Agro Finance projects)

<p>Business &amp; Finance Consulting (BFC) (www.bfconsulting.com) is a leading consulting firm in development finance. We assist financial institutions in emerging markets in improving access to finance for MSMEs and agribusinesses. BFC invites consultants to join our growing, international team of researchers and financial advisors.</p> <p><strong>Duration:</strong> full-time<br /><strong>Duty station:</strong> home office (occasional travel within projects is envisioned. Relocation is also possible)</p> <p><strong>Job responsibilities:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Perform macroeconomic analyses of financial markets in developing countries</li> <li>Collect data on and analyse financial institutions in the emerging markets of Caucasus, Central &amp; Eastern Europe, Balkans, and Central and South-East Asia regions</li> <li>Identify potential risks for banking institutions and financial sectors</li> <li>Perform quantitative and qualitative data analysis</li> <li>Measure the credit, market, operational, and liquidity risks of financial institutions</li> <li>Develop conclusions based on data analysis and research findings</li> <li>Ensure qualitative report writing and development of various presentations</li> <li>Provide comments and recommendations on research findings</li> <li>Contribute to projects and to the execution of BFC technical proposals through research and analysis of the collected data</li> <li>Implement consultancy projects in the area of rural finance and MSME finance (advising financial institutions in the area of MSME and Agro Finance)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Requirements:</strong></p> <ul> <li>University degree in Economics, Finance, Banking or other related fields</li> <li>Experience in development finance research and analysis; experience in development finance consulting or banking fields is an advantage</li> <li>Excellent writing and editing skills in English are essential; working proficiency of Russian and/or other languages is an advantage</li> <li>Critical thinking and problem solving skills are required</li> <li>Demonstrated ability to synthesize facts and insights into concrete and actionable recommendations</li> <li>Proficiency in MS Office; experience with other software is an advantage</li> <li>Experience with data management, ability to understand and interpret data is essential</li> <li>Excellent attention to detail and visualization is required</li> </ul> <p>We are looking for highly motivated, proactive, and result oriented professionals. Interested candidates are invited to submit a CV and a cover letter online at <strong>http://bfconsulting.com/about/vacancies/</strong>.</p> <p><em>Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. Thank you for your application!</em></p>

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 16:25:25 GMT

Expert pour l'appui au dialogue politique et à la gouvernance dans le secteur de la santé publique

<p>Dans le cadre du d&eacute;veloppement de ses activit&eacute;s, la CTB recherche un (h/f):</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>Expert pour l&rsquo;appui au dialogue politique et &agrave; la gouvernance dans le secteur de la sant&eacute; publique &nbsp;&ndash; NIGER </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <h2 align="center"><span style="font-family: Arial;">R&eacute;f.: NER/16/067-2B</span></h2> <h1><span style="font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;</span></h1> <h1><span style="font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;</span></h1> <h1><span style="font-family: Arial;">Lieu d&rsquo;affectation: Niamey, Ambassade de Belgique</span></h1> <p><strong>Dur&eacute;e du contrat: </strong>30 mois <strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Date probable d&rsquo;entr&eacute;e en fonction</strong>: le plus rapidement possible</p> <p><strong>Package salarial mensuel</strong>: (cat. B476) entre 6.575,67 euros et 10.006,80 euros (en ce compris le salaire brut mensuel et les avantages li&eacute;s au statut d'expatri&eacute;: primes d&rsquo;&eacute;loignement et de p&eacute;nibilit&eacute;). Le salaire est calcul&eacute; en fonction de la composition de m&eacute;nage et de l&rsquo;exp&eacute;rience professionnelle pertinente.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><span style="font-size: medium;">Contexte:</span></h3> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>La CTB au Niger met en &oelig;uvre une dizaine de projets pour le compte de la Belgique et de l&rsquo;Union Europ&eacute;enne dans les secteurs de sant&eacute;, &eacute;levage, hydraulique et d&eacute;centralisation. Le montant annuel des d&eacute;penses de ces projets d&eacute;passe 10 millions d&rsquo;Euro.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>La Commission Mixte s&rsquo;est tenue le 22 juin 2016. Un nouveau programme de coop&eacute;ration (PC) (2017-2020) vient d&rsquo;&ecirc;tre sign&eacute; pour le d&eacute;marrage des programmes dans les secteurs de la sant&eacute; et de l&rsquo;&eacute;levage ainsi qu&rsquo;un programme de d&eacute;veloppement des capacit&eacute;s, le budget du PC s&rsquo;&eacute;l&egrave;ve &agrave; 33 millions d&rsquo;Euro (y compris 2 Millions d&rsquo;Euro de coop&eacute;ration d&eacute;l&eacute;gu&eacute;e). Sur le pr&eacute;c&eacute;dent PC un montant de 20 millions d&rsquo;Euro reste &agrave; &ecirc;tre d&eacute;pens&eacute;.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Le niveau de s&eacute;curit&eacute; du dispositif CTB au Niger est en Phase 3 : Situation pr&eacute;occupante - Situation de s&eacute;curit&eacute; fortement d&eacute;grad&eacute;e.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: medium;">Fonction:</span></strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>En appui &agrave; l&rsquo;Ambassade de Belgique dans son r&ocirc;le de &laquo;&nbsp;chef de file&nbsp;&raquo;, l&rsquo;expert sectoriel assurera la coordination entre les PTF et le secteur en question. Pour ce faire, l&rsquo;expert sectoriel identifiera et coordonnera toutes les actions des PTF n&eacute;cessaires &agrave; soutenir le Minist&egrave;re sectoriel dans ses efforts d&rsquo;am&eacute;liorer la performance sectorielle. L&rsquo;expert sectoriel agira en tant que repr&eacute;sentant des PTF envers les autorit&eacute;s nationales et animera le groupe des PTF.</p> <p>En appui de l&rsquo;Ambassade de Belgique, l&rsquo;expert sectoriel fournira un appui au dialogue politique avec le Gouvernement du Niger dans le secteur de la sant&eacute;. L&rsquo;expert sectoriel fera un suivi de l&rsquo;impl&eacute;mentation de la strat&eacute;gie sectorielle et appuiera l&rsquo;Ambassade dans ses t&acirc;ches de pr&eacute;parer et participer aux consultations et coordinations sectorielles au nom du gouvernement belge et dans un contexte de Programmation Conjointe europ&eacute;enne. L&rsquo;expert sectoriel fournira de l&rsquo;information et des analyses pour permettre un meilleur dialogue sectoriel entre partenaires belges, entre la Belgique et les PTF internationaux et au sein des structures nationales de dialogue technique et politique.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: medium;">T&acirc;ches:</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>L&rsquo;expert sectoriel, sous l&rsquo;autorit&eacute; hi&eacute;rarchique du Repr&eacute;sentant R&eacute;sident, appuiera le personnel de l&rsquo;Ambassade dans ses t&acirc;ches. Il ou elle devra&nbsp;:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol start="1"> <li><strong>Par rapport au r&ocirc;le de la Belgique en tant que &laquo;&nbsp;chef de file&nbsp;&raquo; des PTF</strong></li> <ol start="1"> <li>Repr&eacute;senter les PTF vis-&agrave;-vis le Minist&egrave;re sectoriel&nbsp;: agir en tant que porte-parole des PTF du secteur, jouer un r&ocirc;le proactif, stimuler le renforcement du dialogue et parler au nom des PTF tout en s'assurant au pr&eacute;alable que ses d&eacute;clarations refl&egrave;tent les opinions exprim&eacute;es par les PTF&nbsp;;</li> <li>Assurer le suivi des engagements pris par les PTF dans le secteur&nbsp;; faire circuler parmi les PTF toute information pertinente par rapport &agrave; la performance sectorielle&nbsp;;</li> <li>Animer la concertation sectorielle en organisant des r&eacute;unions entre le Minist&egrave;re et les PTF, et en co-pr&eacute;sidant ces r&eacute;unions ensemble avec le Minist&egrave;re&nbsp;;</li> <li>Convoquer et pr&eacute;sider les r&eacute;unions des PTF afin d&rsquo;harmoniser les positions donn&eacute;es au Minist&egrave;re par rapport &agrave; sa politique et ses strat&eacute;gies&nbsp;;</li> <li>Pr&eacute;parer, au nom des PTF, les revues conjointes et les missions conjointes&nbsp;;</li> <li>Assurer une bonne circulation de communication et d&rsquo;information entre le Minist&egrave;re et les PTFs et entre les PTFs&nbsp;;</li> <li>Faciliter l&rsquo;introduction de nouveaux PTF dans le secteur, et motiver les PTF qui ne font pas partie du groupe de concertation des PTF, de rejoindre le groupe&nbsp;;</li> <li>Faciliter la participation des acteurs non-&eacute;tatiques et de la soci&eacute;t&eacute; civile &agrave; la concertation sectorielle&nbsp;;</li> <li>Assurer le secr&eacute;tariat de la coordination des PTF&nbsp;: convoquer des r&eacute;unions, &eacute;laborer les PV, maintenir des bases de donn&eacute;es des PTF et de leurs activit&eacute;s, etc.&nbsp;;</li> <li>Collaborer avec l&rsquo;entit&eacute; du Minist&egrave;re en charge de la coordination et la communication avec les PTF, contribuer &agrave; un meilleur fonctionnement du cadre de concertation entre le Minist&egrave;re et les PTF&nbsp;;</li> <li>Apporter un appui m&eacute;thodologique et technique &agrave; l&rsquo;animation du dialogue politique sectoriel afin d&rsquo;impulser une dynamique de gouvernance sectorielle participative et inclusive dans le secteur ;</li> </ol></ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>Par rapport au suivi du dialogue politique&nbsp;:</strong></li> <ol start="1"> <li>Suivre et analyser l&rsquo;impl&eacute;mentation et le suivi de la strat&eacute;gie nationale sectorielle et le rapportage par le Minist&egrave;re, avec un accent sur l&rsquo;appui au secteur fourni par la coop&eacute;ration belge. Assurer le suivi de la performance du secteur. Fournir des rapports et des conseils &agrave; l&rsquo;Ambassade de Belgique pour sa participation au dialogue politique.</li> <li>Participer activement dans la coordination des PTF et d&rsquo;autres cadres et espaces de concertation nationaux intersectoriels pertinents pour le secteur de la sant&eacute;&nbsp;;</li> <li>Alimenter la r&eacute;flexion sur les orientations strat&eacute;giques, les m&eacute;thodes et outils du secteur, participer aux &eacute;tudes et analyses prospectives strat&eacute;giques engag&eacute;es dans le secteur&nbsp;;</li> <li>Etablir, d&eacute;velopper et maintenir de bonnes relations professionnels avec le(s) expert(s) de coop&eacute;ration technique (ECT2) de la CTB en charge de la pr&eacute;paration, de l&rsquo;ex&eacute;cution et/ou de l&rsquo;appui au programme sectoriel&nbsp;;</li> <li>Etablir, d&eacute;velopper et maintenir de bonnes relations avec le Minist&egrave;re, et avec d&rsquo;autres institutions nationales impliqu&eacute;es dans ou pertinentes pour l&rsquo;impl&eacute;mentation et le suivi de la strat&eacute;gie sectorielle&nbsp;;</li> <li>D&eacute;velopper, maintenir et partager une connaissance et une compr&eacute;hension du secteur, entre autres par un r&eacute;seautage avec des acteurs locaux, publics et priv&eacute;s&nbsp;;</li> <li>Suivre et prendre connaissance des derni&egrave;res &eacute;volutions de la litt&eacute;rature scientifique.</li> </ol></ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong>Par rapport aux rencontres sectorielles de concertation et de coordination&nbsp;:</strong></li> <ol start="1"> <li>Identifier dans le programme sectoriel de la coop&eacute;ration belge, les d&eacute;fis qui n&eacute;cessitent d&rsquo;&ecirc;tre abord&eacute;s au niveau du dialogue politique avec le gouvernement&nbsp;;</li> <li>Pr&eacute;parer et participer dans les r&eacute;unions pr&eacute;paratoires communes de l&rsquo;Ambassade et de la CTB en vue des rencontres sectorielles de concertation et de coordination&nbsp;;</li> <li>Coordonner avec les ECT2 de la CTB en charge de la pr&eacute;paration, de l&rsquo;ex&eacute;cution ou de l&rsquo;appui au programme sectoriel, lors de la pr&eacute;paration d&rsquo;une position belge&nbsp;;</li> <li>Participer, en appui du personnel de l&rsquo;Ambassade, aux rencontres de dialogue politique, bilat&eacute;rales ou multilat&eacute;rales, dans le contexte du programme de coop&eacute;ration gouvernementale&nbsp;;</li> <li>Stimuler une coordination effective entre PTF envers une approche commune de partenariat pour le suivi de la strat&eacute;gie sectorielle et pour le dialogue politique sectoriel&nbsp;;</li> <li>Contribuer &agrave; la pr&eacute;paration des positions communes du groupe sectoriel des PTF&nbsp;;</li> <li>Etablir, d&eacute;velopper et maintenir de bonnes relations avec les PTF actifs dans le secteur.</li> </ol></ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>Par rapport &agrave; la coop&eacute;ration belge&nbsp;:</strong></li> <ol start="1"> <li>Capitaliser le savoir-faire sectoriel afin de partager des exp&eacute;riences pour des politiques, strat&eacute;gies et programmes belges &agrave; venir en documentant le processus d&rsquo;impl&eacute;mentation de la strat&eacute;gie sectorielle et du programme de coop&eacute;ration gouvernemental&nbsp;;</li> <li>Echanger de l&rsquo;expertise et des r&eacute;sultats du programme avec tous les acteurs belges impliqu&eacute;s dans le secteur, promouvoir le r&eacute;seautage et les synergies avec des interventions et des acteurs belges dans le secteur&nbsp;;</li> <li>Apporter un input technique, &agrave; la demande de l&rsquo;ECT 2 du programme gouvernemental sectoriel dans la pr&eacute;paration des dialogues techniques sectoriels au niveau national et r&eacute;gional&nbsp;;</li> <li>Participer au processus de capitalisation et de recherche-actions et &agrave; la diffusion de leurs r&eacute;sultats.</li> </ol></ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cadre r&eacute;glementaire</strong></p> <p>L&rsquo;appui au dialogue politique se fera selon les principes, accords et t&acirc;ches stipul&eacute;s dans les documents officiels suivants&nbsp;:</p> <ul> <li> <p>L&eacute;gislation f&eacute;d&eacute;rale belge sur la coop&eacute;ration au d&eacute;veloppement&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>La convention g&eacute;n&eacute;rale de coop&eacute;ration entre la Belgique et le Niger&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>Le contrat de gestion entre l&rsquo;Etat belge et la CTB&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>Le programme de coop&eacute;ration approuv&eacute; par les deux pays&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>La convention sp&eacute;cifique sur le programme sectoriel entre la Belgique et le Niger&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>La convention de mise en &oelig;uvre entre la DGD et la CTB sur les experts sectoriels en appui du dialogue politique&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>Les notes strat&eacute;giques sectorielles pertinentes de la coop&eacute;ration belge&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>La politique et les strat&eacute;gies sectorielles nationales et les rapports de suivi.</p> </li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: medium;">Profil:</span></strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Formation/exp&eacute;rience requise&nbsp;:</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <ul> <li> <p>Formation universitaire de niveau Master en m&eacute;decine&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>Master en sant&eacute; publique ou en &eacute;conomie de la sant&eacute;&nbsp;;</p> </li> <li> <p>Exp&eacute;rience internationale confirm&eacute;e d&rsquo;au moins 5 ans dans l&rsquo;appui institutionnel au</p> <p>niveau r&eacute;gional (provincial) ou national dans le secteur de la sant&eacute;</p> </li> <li> <p>Exp&eacute;rience professionnelle dans le secteur de la sant&eacute; publique&nbsp;d&rsquo;au moins 10 ans;&nbsp;</p> </li> <li> <p>Exp&eacute;rience professionnelle dans la&nbsp; facilitation du dialogue politique sectoriel.</p> </li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Connaissances et comp&eacute;tences personnelles&nbsp;:</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <ul> <li>Avoir une bonne capacit&eacute; de communication orale et &eacute;crite&nbsp;;</li> <li>Avoir une bonne capacit&eacute; de n&eacute;gociation et de coordination multi-acteurs&nbsp;;</li> <li>Avoir des capacit&eacute;s de facilitation de r&eacute;unions et de discussions participatives avec une capacit&eacute; de synth&egrave;se&nbsp;;</li> <li>Avoir de fortes comp&eacute;tences et capacit&eacute;s d&eacute;montr&eacute;es d&rsquo;analyse, de synth&egrave;se et de conception&nbsp;;</li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>Avoir des capacit&eacute;s r&eacute;dactionnelles av&eacute;r&eacute;es, prouv&eacute;es &agrave; travers des publications techniques ou scientifiques comme premier auteur&nbsp;;</p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li>Avoir un esprit cr&eacute;atif et ouvert&nbsp;;</li> <li>Connaissance solide des approches sectorielles (vision syst&eacute;mique, articulation entre acteurs, notion de dialogue sectoriel etc&hellip;)&nbsp;;</li> <li>Connaissances des outils et m&eacute;thodes de planification, suivi-&eacute;valuation et capitalisation dans le cadre de programme de d&eacute;veloppement&nbsp;;</li> <li>Avoir une sensibilit&eacute; aux th&egrave;mes transversaux (droits humains, genre, droits de l&rsquo;enfant, environnement) et exp&eacute;rience d&rsquo;int&eacute;gration de ces th&egrave;mes dans les programmes de d&eacute;veloppement&nbsp;;</li> <li>Pr&ecirc;t &agrave; travailler dans une zone comportant un degr&eacute; d&rsquo;ins&eacute;curit&eacute;, et de suivre les &nbsp;proc&eacute;dures de s&eacute;curit&eacute; instaur&eacute;es par la CTB.</li> <li>Connaissance approfondie du fran&ccedil;ais&nbsp;; bonne connaissance de l&rsquo;anglais &eacute;crit (lecture de la litt&eacute;rature scientifique), le n&eacute;erlandais constitue un avantage.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: medium;">Int&eacute;ress&eacute;(e)?</span></strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Postulez <strong>au plus tard le 09/04/2017 via notre site web&nbsp;: </strong>https://www.btcctb.org/fr/content/jobs</p> <p>Pour toute question suppl&eacute;mentaire, contactez-nous au 02/505 18 65.</p>

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 13:21:17 GMT

International Programme Coordinator Public Health

<p>To further develop its activities, BTC is looking for a (m/f):</p> <p><strong><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>International Programme Coordinator </strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>Public health</strong></p> <h2 align="center"><span style="font-family: Arial;">&nbsp;</span></h2> <h2 align="center"><span style="font-family: Arial;">Ref. BEN/13/025-10</span></h2> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Through this recruitment procedure, a recruitment pool will be constituted for this type of function. This pool will not be limited to the country concerned.</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <h1><span style="font-family: Arial;">Place of assignment: different places of assignment; there are job openings for Benin (Cotonou) and Niger (Niamey)</span></h1> <p><strong>Type of contract: </strong>Open-ended contract with termination clause</p> <p><strong>Expected starting date:</strong> as soon as possible</p> <p><strong>Monthly salary package</strong>: (cat. B476) depending on the place of assignment&nbsp;:</p> <ul> <li> <p>For Benin&nbsp;: between 5.784,23 euro and 8.204,79 euro</p> </li> <li> <p>For Niger&nbsp;: between 6.575,67 euro and 10.006,80 euro</p> <p>(inclusive gross monthly salary and expat benefits: expat and hardship allowances). The salary depends on the composition of the family and on relevant professional experience.</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: medium;">The function:</span></h3> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Responsibilities (Benin)</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>&nbsp;</em></strong></p> <ol start="1"> <li>Technical component of the support (estimated half-time equivalent): During implementation of the intervention the technical advisor is responsible for close high-quality technical support in the areas of change management and public health. (S)he is responsible for the whole of the results, with the support of the PASS team.</li> </ol> <p>&nbsp;</p> <ol start="2"> <li>Management component of the support (estimated half-time equivalent): The technical advisor shares the responsibility for coordinating and implementing PASS with the Intervention Director of the PASS programme (person delegated by the General Secretariat). Jointly, they constitute the Programme Coordination.</li> </ol> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Responsibilities (Niger)</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>&nbsp;</em></strong></p> <p>The type 2 Technical Cooperation Expert (TCE2) is responsible for the coordination and management of the implementation of the bilateral development cooperation in the Health sector in Niger. Considering the general and specific objective of the support programme to the health sector, the TCE will be a Public Health expert with sound knowledge of and experience with health financing.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Responsibilities</strong></p> <p>1/ Formulation and programme start-up component: Ensure, jointly with the partner country officer, that programme formulation is realised in consultation with the stakeholders, the partner country and regional focal points as well as the Resident Representative and the BTC team that (s)he supervises.</p> <p>2/ Coordination component: The type 2 TCE ensures, jointly with the partner country officer of the PASS programme (person delegated by the General Secretariat), that the programme is coordinated. That way (s)he is responsible for implementing the programme in consultation with the partner country officer in order to ensure that the results are achieved.</p> <p>3/ Technical support component: During implementation of the intervention the technical advisor is responsible for close high-quality technical support in the areas of change management and public health. (S)he is responsible for the whole of the results, with the support of the PASS team.</p> <p>4/ Team management component: Ensure the functioning of programme staff employed by BTC.</p> <p>Time will be mostly &ndash; and to an equal extent &ndash; spent on the &lsquo;technical&rsquo; and &lsquo;coordination&rsquo; components. The &lsquo;team management&rsquo; component is however primarily a transversal one. The specific tasks related to this component take a minor share of the working time of the TCE.</p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: medium;">Duty station and institutional framework</span></h3> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">For the job in Benin:</span></p> <p>The selected applicant will work in Cotonou at the Ministry of Health. (S)he will fall under the General Secretariat. (S)he will frequently travel to the departments in order to ensure the relation between the central level, the intermediary level and the operations level. The specific embedment does not impede the advisor to work with several directorates of the Ministry.</p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">For the job in Niger:</span></p> <p>The main working place is Niamey. The job requires frequent missions to the Dosso and Tillab&eacute;ri regions.</p> <p>The selected applicant will work in Niamey at the Ministry of Public Health (&lsquo;MSP&rsquo;), where (s)he will fall under the General Secretariat (&lsquo;SG&rsquo;). (S)he will frequently travel to the regions in order to ensure the relation between the central level, the intermediary level and the operations level. Notwithstanding the specific embedment at the &lsquo;SG&rsquo; level, the joint officer is to work closely with several &lsquo;MSP&rsquo; directorates.</p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <h3><span style="font-size: medium;">Profile</span></h3> <p><span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Level of education</span></strong></p> <ul> <li> <p>Public health physician.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Proved experience</span></strong></p> </li> </ul> <ul> <li> <p>At least 10 years of professional experience, with at least 5 years in an international context in a developing country and in the domain of public health</p> </li> <li> <p>Experience with health economics and health insurance mechanisms</p> </li> <li> <p>Experience with planning, organising, managing, coordination, supervision, monitoring and evaluation at the provincial or national level</p> </li> <li> <p>Experience with accompanying a change management process</p> </li> <li> <p>Experience with supervising health districts and with action research</p> </li> <li> <p>Experience with project cycle management under an international cooperation framework</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;">The following are considered assets:</span></p> </li> <li> <p>Earlier experience in a similar job within a development cooperation organisation in the area of public health</p> </li> <li> <p>Existing knowledge of the partner country situation</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Skills</span></strong></p> </li> <li> <p>Strong ability to work in a multicultural and multidisciplinary setting</p> </li> <li> <p>Strong interpersonal skills (facilitation skills, coaching skills, negotiation skills, flexibility, attitude of empathy, networking)</p> </li> <li> <p>Good conceptual reflection skills</p> </li> <li> <p>Team coaching and training skills</p> </li> <li> <p>Action research and survey skills</p> </li> <li> <p>Very good mastery of French; good reading skills in English</p> </li> <li> <p>Very good computer literacy (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, databases)</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Interested?</strong></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> </li> </ul> <p>Please apply no later than <strong>April 2<sup>nd</sup> 2017</strong>, through our website:https://www.btcctb.org/content/jobs.</p> <p>If you have any additional questions<strong>,</strong> don&rsquo;t hesitate to contact us at +32 (0)2/505 18 65.</p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p>

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 13:20:04 GMT

Health Economics Advisor

Global Health Fellows Program Technical Advisor II/III: Health Economics Advisor Systems and Program Sustainability Division, Office of HIV/AIDS, Bureau for Global Health, United States Agency for International Development Location: Arlington, VA Assignment: Two year fellowship GHFP-II-P6-244 The Global Health Fellows Program (GHFP-II) is a cooperative agreement implemented and managed by the Public Health Institute in partnership with Global Health Corps, GlobeMed, Management Systems International and PYXERA Global. GHFP-II is supported by the US Agency for International Development (USAID). GHFP-II’s goal is to improve the effectiveness of USAID health programs by addressing the Agency’s immediate and emerging human capacity needs. The program seeks to accomplish this goal first through the recruitment, placement and support of diverse health professionals at the junior, mid and senior levels. These program participants include fellows, interns, corporate volunteers and Foreign Service National professionals. The program then provides substantial performance management and career development support to participants, including annual work planning assistance, and ensures that professional development opportunities are available. Looking to the future, GHFP-II also seeks to establish a pool of highly-qualified global health professionals that will ensure the Agency’s ongoing technical leadership and effectiveness. This objective is supported by an extensive outreach program that brings global health opportunities and specialized career advice to a diverse range of interested individuals, with a particular focus on those underrepresented in the field of global health. BACKGROUND: The United States Government (USG) has made the fight against HIV and AIDS a top priority, not only for humanitarian reasons, but because the HIV & AIDS crisis threatens the prosperity, stability and development of nations around the world. The US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) is a USG global initiative to control the HIV & AIDS pandemic. It is the largest commitment by any nation to combat a single disease. Over the past decade, the US government has committed more than $52 billion to bilateral HIV and AIDS programs, the Global Fund to Fight HIV & AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and bilateral tuberculosis programs. To achieve an AIDS-free generation, PEPFAR works closely with a variety of stakeholders including partner countries, multilateral organizations, civil society, people living with and affected by HIV, the faith community, and the public and private sectors. USAID has been, and continues to be, at the forefront of the USG response in the fight against the HIV and AIDS pandemic since inception of its international HIV & AIDS program in 1986. With a focus on transparency, accountability, and impact, PEPFAR is actively working with partners to control the HIV and AIDS pandemic to help achieve an AIDS-Free generation. PEPFAR is committed to supporting activities that are grounded in science and critical to saving lives and preventing new HIV infections. PEPFAR’s core activities include a focus on health systems, including health finance; human resources for health; commodity procurement and supply chain systems; and laboratory systems. PEPFAR recognizes that donor resources alone cannot meet the needs of the 35 million people that will be living with HIV in 2020. As developing economies grow and begin to more fully realize their economic potential, unlocking domestic financing for HIV becomes a critical element of achieving long-term sustainability of the HIV and AIDS response. Countries are increasingly taking the lead in managing, implementing, and even financing their national HIV responses. As a result, PEPFAR has committed funding to support countries to strengthen their ongoing efforts to increase the use of their own resources to help deliver an AIDS-free generation. Health systems strengthening (HSS) is a key strategy to secure the sustainability of past and future achievements. PEPFAR provides an opportunity to strengthen health systems and health policy, as the USG's and its partners' efforts to combat HIV and AIDS transition from an initial emergency approach to a more long-term sustainable approach. USAID's HSS program provides support to ensure that developing country health systems are effective, efficient, and equitable. PEPFAR has recently launched an HIV and AIDS financing initiative to support countries to leverage their own domestic resources in an effort to help deliver an AIDS-Free generation. USAID will serve as the lead agency for coordinating and implementing this initiative, and the expectation is that efforts could yield a significant benefit and a substantial return on the initial investment for impact on the resources these countries will be able to put towards increasing prevention, care, and treatment coverage for achieving sustainable control of the epidemic. The centrally funded initiative was developed out of collaboration between the Office of HIV/AIDS and the Office of Health Systems in the Global Health Bureau and the Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and the Environment. USAID will partner closely with selected Missions and relevant stakeholders to support new and ongoing health financing activities that aim to increase domestic resources for the health. Solutions tailored to individual country contexts will involve health financing approaches encompassing advocacy and analysis, technical efficiency, tax policy and administration, and innovative health financing, including use of the private sector. The initiative will support PEPFAR key interventions areas to ensure impact and efficiency gains, build sustainability and partnerships, and advance the human rights agenda. USAID will coordinate and collaborate across USG Agencies and with multilateral stakeholders in the design and implementation of this initiative. INTRODUCTION: The overall objective of USAID's Bureau for Global Health (GH), Office of HIV/AIDS's (OHA) HSS program is to provide USAID leadership in building sustainability of the HIV & AIDS response through investment in health systems. OHA views health systems strengthening as a continuous process of implementing changes in policies, management and systems within the health sector. OHA works collaboratively within USAID, with other USG agencies, and with the international community to implement its HSS vision through coordinating activities, evaluating programs, developing guidance and supporting countries to ensure the application of up-to-date health systems development interventions in both the public and private sectors. The HIV/AIDS Health Economic Advisor (Advisor) will focus on health and HIV/AIDS financing, with key technical emphases on technical efficiency, domestic resource mobilization, cost modeling and cost effectiveness analysis, efficient resource allocation, economic evaluation, and generation of data and information for informed decision-making. The Advisor will be assigned to the Bureau for Global Health, Office of HIV/AIDS, Systems and Program Sustainability Division (SPS) and will receive programmatic and technical guidance from the Health Economics, Finance and Policy (HFE) Team Branch Chief as her/his onsite manager. The Systems and Program Sustainability Division (GH/OHA/SPS) provides technical leadership and strategic direction on issues related to systems strengthening, financing, health workforce, advancing sustainability, commodity social marketing and public-private partnerships for HIV/AIDS programs. SPS consists of three branches –the Health Finance and Economics Branch, the Health Workforce Branch and the Capacity Building and Partnerships Branch. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The Health Economics Advisor will serve primarily as a health economics and finance advisor on the OHA/SPS Health Finance and Economics Branch, and will provide key technical and programmatic support to the GH Bureau’s Cross-Office Team for USAID’s HIV and AIDS Sustainable Financing Initiative. S/he will help in advancing OHA's vision and goals for domestic resource mobilization for HIV/ AIDS and long-term sustainable programming for control of the epidemic. The Health Economics Advisor will be responsible for: Providing technical advice, planning and program development support for USAID’s HIV/AIDS Sustainable Financing Initiative. Providing technical advice to USAID GH projects on areas related to health finance and economics within PEPFAR. Providing technical support to USAID missions and PEPFAR country teams in areas of health finance and the assessment, design and implementation of HIV-related financing strategies. Providing technical assistance to improve budgeting, budget execution, resource tracking and allocation. Supporting briefings, management updates and communications. Liaising with multiple PEPFAR technical working groups to provide technical and coordination support to financing and cost analyses, expenditure analyses and other economic evaluation activities. Monitoring implementing partners' health financing work in the field, including fulfillment of a technical advisory role on specific projects as assigned. Coordinating with the Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) and other PEPFAR implementing agencies on OHA-led and jointly led health finance activities. Providing technical support for the annual development of the OHA PEPFAR Headquarters Operational Plan, including for funding and activity design for health and HIV/AIDS financing. Supporting the annual PEPFAR Country Operational Plan (COP) for health and HIV/AIDS finance and economics. Supporting the annual Headquarters Operational Planning (HOP) process. Participating in the PEPFAR Interagency Collaborative for Program Improvement to support health economics activities. LEVEL III An Advisor at the Level III will further be responsible for: Serving as a technical lead and resource for OHA, USAID and PEPFAR in the areas of health finance and economic evaluation practices, and the assessment, design and implementation of HIV-related financing strategies. Leading coordination with the Global Health Bureau’s Office of Health Systems and the Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and the Environment on emergent Health Finance issues as related to PEPFAR. TRAINING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (7%) Keeping abreast of the state-of-the-art health financing, economic evaluation and cost analysis for HIV/AIDS programming and interventions. Deepening knowledge of health financing, economic evaluation and cost analysis for HIV/AIDS programming and interventions. Participating in interagency and intra-agency working groups as appropriate to the scope of work. Participating in professional meetings as appropriate to SOW. Participating in professional continuing education and skills training within the purview of GHFP-II. International travel approximately 20-25%. REQUIRED SKILLS, KNOWLEDGE & EXPERIENCE: Master's degree or higher in economics, health economics, health finance, or other relevant field. Demonstrated understanding of and ability to apply accepted tools, techniques and frameworks for health financing, economic evaluation and cost analysis of HIV & AIDS interventions. High degree of judgment, ingenuity and originality to interpret strategy, to analyze, develop and present work and to monitor and evaluate implementation of programs. Strong leadership and group facilitation skills. Demonstrated experience working with a wide range of development partners, including multilateral and bilateral donors as well as private foundations and civil society. Demonstrated knowledge of internal processes within the USG and other health sector development partners, (e.g. thematic priorities, decision-making mechanisms, and preferred funding channels). Experience with global health partnerships and disease-specific initiatives. Excellent interpersonal, communication and writing skills and the ability to work with diverse teams. Strong teamwork, multi-stakeholder collaboration and management skills. Ability to travel internationally. US Citizenship or Permanent Residency required. In addition to the above, the position requires the following at each level: TECHNICAL ADVISOR II Minimum five (5) years' experience in finance and economics, to include two (2) years in health finance, resource mobilization, research management and implementation, with experience in international or resource-challenged settings. Minimum of five (5) years' experience in cost analysis, economic evaluation and capacity building in developing countries, and research design. TECHNICAL ADVISOR III Minimum ten (10) years' experience in finance and economics, to include three to five (3-5) years in health finance, resource mobilization, research management and implementation, with experience in international or resource-challenged settings. Minimum of ten (10) years' experience in cost analysis, economic evaluation and capacity building in developing countries, and research design. SALARY AND BENEFITS: Salary based on commensurate experience and earnings history. The Public Health Institute offers a comprehensive benefits package including professional development programs. TO APPLY: All applicants are required to apply for this position through GHFP-II’s online recruitment system at https://www.ghfp.net/recruitment/, which allows you to store your CV, profile and bio data form in our database. A separate cover letter describing your qualifications and experience, interest and familiarity with issues relating to this position, and how this position relates to your career goals is required for each application. All online applications must be submitted by April 5, 2017 by 5:00 pm Eastern time. We are proud to be an EEO/AA Employer.

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 20:28:59 GMT

Consultant, Private Sector Panel Representative

<p><strong>Australia Awards &ndash; Mongolia</strong><br /><strong>Consultant, Joint Selection Team</strong></p> <p><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>Coffey International Development (Coffey) manages the Australia Awards in Mongolia (the Program) on behalf of the Australian Government. The Program aims to improve human resource capacity in the private and public sectors and enhance opportunities for knowledge-sharing and links between Australia and Mongolia. Coffey&rsquo;s Mongolia team manages each stage of the Scholarships cycle, to identify qualified candidates from targeted areas to study Master level courses at Australian universities.</p> <p><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p>Coffey is seeking applications for the following Consultant for short term opportunities to participate in various stages of the selection process for Australia Awards recipients.</p> <p><strong>Consultant, Private Sector Panel Representative (1 position) - 495211</strong></p> <p>Consultants will contribute objectively as a member of a selection panel and participate in the assessment of candidates, including recording assessment notes.</p> <p><em>The assignment is approximately 1 week in late June-early July 2017.</em></p> <p><em>Reserved for Mongolian citizens.</em></p> <p>This position requires flexible contract start and end dates to accommodate work demands, based on the number of applications received. Successful applicants will be inducted on the activity requirements prior to commencement.</p> <p><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>To be successful in the above vacancy you will have be tertiary qualified, preferably post-graduate level and possess high-level of written and verbal English with the ability to contribute to panel discussions and decision-making. An understanding of the Australian university system, especially study requirements at post-graduate levels is advantageous.</p> <p><strong>How to Apply</strong></p> <p>Please visit <strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong> for detailed position descriptions for each role and to apply online. Please search by the reference number <strong>495211</strong>.</p> <p>For any enquiries, please contact <a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a></p> <p><strong>Applications close 5.00pm Mongolia time, Tuesday 28 March 2017</strong></p> <p>Note: There is no provision for hard-copy applications.</p> <p>For full details on DFAT&rsquo;s Adviser Remuneration Framework please view via www.dfat.gov.au</p>

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 03:34:33 GMT

Consultant, Academic Specialist

<p><strong>Australia Awards &ndash; Mongolia</strong><br /><strong>Consultant, Joint Selection Team</strong></p> <p><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>Coffey International Development (Coffey) manages the Australia Awards in Mongolia (the Program) on behalf of the Australian Government. The Program aims to improve human resource capacity in the private and public sectors and enhance opportunities for knowledge-sharing and links between Australia and Mongolia. Coffey&rsquo;s Mongolia team manages each stage of the Scholarships cycle, to identify qualified candidates from targeted areas to study Master level courses at Australian universities.</p> <p><strong>The Position</strong></p> <p>Coffey is seeking applications for the following Consultant for short term opportunities to participate in various stages of the selection process for Australia Awards recipients.</p> <p><strong>Consultant, Academic Specialist (1 position) - 495210</strong></p> <p>The consultant will contribute objectively as a selection panel member of both Category 1 (public sector employees) and Category 2 (private sector employees) candidates. In addition the consultant will facilitate and undertake the assessment and selection of Masters by research proposals.</p> <p><em>The assignment is approximately 2 weeks in late June-early July 2017.</em></p> <p><em>Classified C3 under the DFAT Adviser Remuneration Framework</em></p> <p>This position requires flexible contract start and end dates to accommodate work demands, based on the number of applications received. Successful applicants will be inducted on the activity requirements prior to commencement.</p> <p><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>To be successful in the above vacancy you will have be tertiary qualified, preferably post-graduate level and possess high-level of written and verbal English with the ability to contribute to panel discussions and decision-making. An understanding of the Australian university system, especially study requirements at post-graduate levels is advantageous.</p> <p><strong>How to Apply</strong></p> <p>Please visit <strong>www.coffey.com/careers</strong> for a detailed position description and to apply online. Please search by the reference number <strong>495210</strong>.</p> <p>For any enquiries, please contact <a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a></p> <p><strong>Applications close 5.00pm Mongolia time, Tuesday 28 March 2017</strong></p> <p>Note: There is no provision for hard-copy applications.</p> <p>For full details on DFAT&rsquo;s Adviser Remuneration Framework please view via www.dfat.gov.au</p>

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 03:26:03 GMT

Consultant, Assessment & Ranking consultants (2 positions)

<p><strong>Australia Awards &ndash; Mongolia</strong><br /><strong>Consultants, Joint Selection Team</strong></p> <p><strong>The Program</strong></p> <p>Coffey International Development (Coffey) manages the Australia Awards in Mongolia (the Program) on behalf of the Australian Government. The Program aims to improve human resource capacity in the private and public sectors and enhance opportunities for knowledge-sharing and links between Australia and Mongolia. Coffey&rsquo;s Mongolia team manages each stage of the Scholarships cycle, to identify qualified candidates from targeted areas to study Master level courses at Australian universities.</p> <p><strong>The Positions</strong></p> <p>Coffey is seeking applications for the following Consultants for short term opportunities to participate in various stages of the selection process for Australia Awards recipients.</p> <p><strong>Consultant, Assessment &amp; Ranking consultants (2 positions) - 495209</strong></p> <p>Consultants will work cooperatively to assess and rank applicants for interview, ensuring the quality and objectivity of this component of the scholarship assessment process.</p> <p><em>The assignment is approximately 4 weeks in May 2017.</em></p> <p><em>Classified C3 under the DFAT Adviser Remuneration Framework</em></p> <p>These positions require flexible contract start and end dates to accommodate work demands, based on the number of applications received. Successful applicants will be inducted on the activity requirements prior to commencement.</p> <p><strong>The Person</strong></p> <p>To be successful in the above vacancies you will have be tertiary qualified, preferably post-graduate level and possess high-level of written and verbal English with the ability to contribute to panel discussions and decision-making. An understanding of the Australian university system, especially study requirements at post-graduate levels is advantageous.</p> <p><strong>How to Apply</strong></p> <p>Please visit<strong> www.coffey.com/careers</strong> for a detailed position description and to apply online. Please search by the reference number <strong>495209</strong>.</p> <p>For any enquiries, please contact <a href="mailto:internationaldevelopment@coffey.com">internationaldevelopment@coffey.com</a></p> <p><strong>Applications close 5.00pm Mongolia time, Tuesday 28 March 2017</strong></p> <p>Note: There is no provision for hard-copy applications.</p> <p>For full details on DFAT&rsquo;s Adviser Remuneration Framework please view via www.dfat.gov.au</p>

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 03:17:47 GMT

Senior Grants Officer for Asia

<p><strong>Organisational Context </strong></p> <p>The Global Community Engagement and Resilience Fund (GCERF) is a Swiss Foundation that supports local, community-level initiatives worldwide that address the local drivers of violent extremism and strengthen resilience against violent extremist agendas. It was established in Geneva, Switzerland in 2014 as a public-private partnership governed by a multi-stakeholder Board which includes representatives of countries which provide funds, countries to which funding is allocated, civil society, the private sector, research institutions and foundations.</p> <p>&nbsp;GCERF has developed a number of funding mechanisms to optimise its grant-making. GCERF&rsquo;s Core Funding Mechanism, which currently forms the foundations of GCERF&rsquo;s work, operates in countries that have requested GCERF&rsquo;s support and have established a national, multi-stakeholder platform (Country Support Mechanism) to assess the unique national challenge of violent extremism. This needs assessment informs GCERF funding priorities. Decisions to fund specific programmes are based on expert technical analysis and rigorous due diligence of potential grantees.</p> <p>&nbsp;GCERF is currently working in Bangladesh, Kenya, Kosovo, Mali and Nigeria. GCERF is committed to empowering local communities. GCERF provides funding to organisations (Principal Recipients) which themselves form and lead a consortium of community-based organisations strongly engaged with communities to implement a comprehensive set of initiatives that address the local drivers of violent extremism and strengthen resilience against violent extremist agendas. In 2017, GCERF is expanding its portfolio in Bangladesh to include a small grants programme which will require some form of in-country presence. GCERF is also exploring the potential for launching in Myanmar in 2017.</p> <p>&nbsp;To enhance performance, GCERF supports and promotes the development of grantee capacity and learning, and applies a robust and pragmatic performance monitoring and evaluation framework to ensure mutual accountability, transparency and learning. GCERF is in the process of launching complimentary funding streams in the aforementioned as well as new countries.</p> <p>&nbsp;<strong>Purpose of Position</strong></p> <p>The Senior Grants Officer manages GCERF&rsquo;s funding portfolio in Bangladesh and potentially in future Myanmar, provides thematic and country expertise, guidance and support.</p> <p>&nbsp;<strong>Organisational Setting and Reporting Relationships</strong></p> <p>The Senior Grants Officer reports to the Chief Operating Officer. The Senior Grants Officer works in close collaboration with colleagues in the Operations Unit; as well as in cooperation with the Finance and Compliance and External Relations Units.</p> <p><strong>Accountabilities &amp; Responsibilities</strong></p> <p><em>Country-Level Engagement</em></p> <p>&nbsp;In designated countries:</p> <ul> <li>Contribute to the development and implementation of country engagement strategies drawing on country specific knowledge, understanding and experience.</li> <li>Build and maintain strong working relations with relevant government authorities, as well as community level, national and international stakeholders, including GCERF&rsquo;s Governing Board representatives at country level.</li> <li>Prepare, participate in, and follow up on country missions, such as country engagement visits, Country Support Mechanism accompaniment visits, and public information and launch visits.</li> <li>Provide technical expertise and support national consultations on the prevention and countering of violent extremism, including in the development of the national needs assessment that informs GCERF funding priorities.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;<em>Grant Making</em></p> <p>&nbsp;In designated countries:</p> <ul> <li>Manage the grant making process, ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and adherence to GCERF&rsquo;s grant making principles.</li> <li>Implement with care due diligence and risk assessment procedures to inform the selection of potential grantees, including in-country visits.</li> <li>Provide technical guidance and support to potential grantees on each step of the grant making process.</li> <li>Support grant development and negotiation prior to the signing of grant agreements with grantees.</li> <li>Prepare draft grant agreements and standard project documents in adherence with GCERF grant making principles and relevant country specific awards decisions by the GCERF Governing Board.</li> <li>Draft reports on designated countries and contribute to relevant documents and presentations to support decision-making by stakeholders, including the Country Support Mechanism, the Independent Review Panel, the GCERF Governing Board and relevant subsidiary bodies.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;<em>Grant Management</em></p> <p><em>&nbsp;</em>In designated countries:</p> <ul> <li>Accompany grant implementation by grantees, ensuring efficiency, effectiveness and adherence to GCERF&rsquo;s grant implementation principles.</li> <li>Maintain strong working relations with grantees (and service providers) professionally and efficiently to ensure value for money, and to minimize the potential for fraud, inefficiency and waste.</li> <li>Conduct regular monitoring of grant implementation to track milestones, compliance, timelines and deliverables including through the analysis of periodic reports and provision of feedback to grantees, and regular site visits to grantee.</li> <li>Analyze grantee fund disbursement requests in a timely manner and make recommendations.</li> <li>Prepare regular reports on grantee performance, identify any significant deviations or delays to planned grant implementation, propose recommended courses of action, and in consultation with relevant colleagues, work with grantees to meet their performance obligations.</li> <li>In collaboration with the Finance and Compliance Unit, coordinate grant budget revisions and cash flow projections, follow established risk management, due diligence and anti-corruption policies, regulations and procedures, and propose mitigation options taking into account potential fraud, operational and strategic risks.</li> <li>Prepare annual and end of grant reports, and support and facilitate the performance evaluation of grantee and national funding cycle by GCERF&rsquo;s dedicated performance monitoring and evaluation staff.</li> <li>Manage and coordinate country level grant portfolio, keeping abreast of in country developments, identifying trends that may potentially affect both grantee performance and GCERF&rsquo;s wider operations.</li> <li>Nurture, strengthen, and facilitate collaboration and information exchange between grantees and other stakeholders on the prevention and countering of violent extremism. Support the provision of training and other capacity development support to grantees provided by GCERF or associated service providers.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;<em>General</em></p> <p>&nbsp;Provide thematic and country specific expertise on preventing violent extremism and civil society on assigned country or countries.</p> <ul> <li>Prepare and submit mandatory internal operational reports such as travel reports, regular country progress reports, and other papers.</li> <li>In consultation with the Finance and Compliance Unit, develop and manage the implementation of the work plan and operational expenses budget for designated countries.</li> <li>Contribute to work planning and operational expenses budget development of the Operations Unit.</li> <li>Participate and actively contribute to internal review and learning processes to promote continuous improvements.</li> <li>Contribute to the preparation of external updates, presentations, and reports to support external relations and resource mobilization efforts.</li> <li>Upon request, represent the Operations Unit on organisation-wide task forces, study groups, etc. <ul> <li>Serves as back-up to colleagues within the Operations Unit, fulfilling their duties and responsibilities as requested by the supervisor.</li> <li>Undertakes other duties as requested by the supervisor.</li> </ul> </li> </ul> <ul> <li>As requested, represent GCERF in relevant international, regional and national conferences, foster partnerships and facilitate relationship building amongst stakeholders.</li> </ul> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong><strong>Profile</strong></p> <p><em>Experience</em></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong>At least twelve years of experience working with multilateral, bilateral or development organisations, NGOs, foundations, or other non-profit grant-making entities, including a minimum of six years of field-based experience, ideally in the Asia region. Additional headquarters experience is an asset.</p> <p>&nbsp;The successful candidate must be able to demonstrate:</p> <ul> <li>Extensive experience of grant-making, due diligence processes and grant management in the context of preventing/countering violent extremism, conflict and prevention, transformation, development or humanitarian action.</li> <li>Extensive knowledge and understanding of programme design and development, project cycle management, and financial budgeting and reporting.</li> <li>Experience of engaging with diverse national stakeholders in Asia, including governmental authorities is a strong asset.</li> <li>Experience of working alongside a wide range of grantees with skill and sensitivity, including community-based and grassroots organisations preferably in Asia.</li> <li>In-depth understanding of the work and challenges of community-based and grassroots organisations an asset.</li> <li>Strong knowledge of the socio-political environment and civil society organisations in Asia and ideally Bangladesh and/or Myanmar.</li> <li>Experience of working with Consortium funding models and small grants programmes an asset.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;<em>Education</em></p> <p>&nbsp;Postgraduate degree in international development, international relations/affairs, social sciences, business, management, or a related field.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong><em>Languages</em></p> <p>&nbsp;Fluency in English is required. Working knowledge of other relevant languages will be an advantage.</p> <p>&nbsp;<em>Competencies</em></p> <p>&nbsp;Ability to develop and maintain effective and respectful relationships with grantees, and other national and international stakeholders.</p> <ul> <li>Excellent interpersonal, presentation and oral communication skills.</li> <li>Excellent writing skills and attention to detail.</li> <li>Capacity to plan and organise one&rsquo;s work effectively and collaboratively.</li> <li>Demonstrated ability to work independently and as part of a team.</li> <li>Focus and commitment to achieving quality results.</li> <li>Sensitivity in framing and presenting potential opportunities and challenges, and good judgement in reporting ideas and issues judiciously,</li> <li>Poise, maturity, and ability to represent GCERF in relevant fora.</li> <li>Flexibility and ability to stay effective and motivated in a fast changing environment.</li> <li>Commitment to continuous learning and a desire to keep abreast of new developments in relevant fields of thematic or functional expertise, and contribute to the learning of colleagues.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;<em>Travel</em></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong>Ability and willingness to travel 30 to 50% per year to assigned countries, in blocks of one and two weeks.</p> <p>&nbsp;<strong>General</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;Contract Type: Open-ended.</p> <p>&nbsp;GCERF is committed to diversity within its workforce and encourages applications from all qualified candidates.</p> <p>&nbsp;The position is based in Geneva. GCERF offers a competitive salary and benefits package.</p> <p>&nbsp;<strong>Application Deadline:</strong> 16 April 2017.</p> <p>&nbsp;As a part of the recruitment process, shortlisted applicants will be asked to complete a written assignment and participate in two interviews.</p> <p>&nbsp;How to Apply: Please visit the GCERF website at http://www.gcerf.org/about-us/career-opportunities/.</p> <p>&nbsp;Applicants who have previously applied for a position as Senior Grants Officer need not re-apply.</p>

Mon, 13 Mar 2017 14:59:41 GMT

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