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Utilising Electricity Access for Poverty Reduction - Full report

<p>The productive use of electricity can support sustained poverty reduction by enabling the creation and improvement of income generating activities. However, in order to realise these positive impacts, the level of electricity access must be sufficient and enabling conditions beyond the electricity supply itself must be in place.</p><p>The relationship between electricity access provision and poverty reduction has been unclear and policymakers are seeking answers to the following questions:</p><ul><li>What level of electricity access is required to enable and sustain poverty escape?</li><li>What constraints, despite increased access to electricity, mean that people are not able to use that electricity productively? How can they be removed?&nbsp;</li></ul><p>The research presented in this report has sought to explore these questions through a review of existing literature and case studies in Kenya and India which looked at the policy and regulatory regime in each country, and included stakeholder interviews and field research. The Literature Review and Case Study reports are available seperately from the Practical Action <a href="http://practicalaction.org/utilising">website</a>.</p>

12 Jan 2017 02:30:46 GMT

Steps to overcome the North–South divide in research relevant to climate change policy and practice

<p>The authors of this Nature Climate Change Perspective article argue that Northern (developed country) domination of science relevant to climate change policy and practice, and limited research led by researchers in Southern developing countries, may be hindering further development and implementation of global climate change agreements and nationally appropriate actions. They acknowledge that some efforts have been made to address the divide but argue that progress has been slow. The article illustrates the extent of the divide, reviews underlying issues and analyses their consequences for climate change policy develop-ment and implementation. The authors propose a set of practical steps that a wide range of actors should take at global, regional and national scales to address this knowledge divide, with examples of some actions already being implemented.</p>

11 Jan 2017 11:41:23 GMT

Financing Universal Access to Electricity

<p>The recent emphasis on the provision of modern energy services as an important ingredient for development has improved finance availability for the goal of Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL).</p><p>However, existing financial flows are still insufficient to meet the target of universal access of sustainable energy by 2030 and often ignore poor people, who cannot afford the service, or those renewable energy technologies that cannot offer high rates of return.</p><p>Drawing on a large dataset of official development assistance and private investment for electrification between 1990 and 2012, our research has looked at the factors that explain donor and private finance in the electricity sector of developing countries. What lessons can be taken and shared with policymakers to avoid past mistakes and target countries and technologies that have been neglected in previous efforts?</p>

11 Jan 2017 05:21:27 GMT

Pro-Poor Access to Green Electricity in Kenya

<p>Is Kenya on track to follow an electrification strategy that is green and pro-poor? What are the main challenges to following this path? The two questions guiding this study are particularly relevant in a country with exceptional renewable energy resources, but where 80 per cent of the population lacks access to electricity and 50 per cent lives in poverty.</p><p>This study looks at four particular issues relating to access to green electricity for the poor: accessibility; commercial viability for project developers; financial sustainability for the State; and affordability. We will focus on grid electricity and mini-grids. For grid-connected generation, once electricity is fed to the grid, the issues of accessibility and affordability for the poor depend on national policies determining who gets electricity and at what price, making it impossible to differentiate between green and non-green electricity.</p><p>However, our study will show whether or not on-grid renewable generation can be financially sustainable in Kenya while providing affordable fees. For off-grid electricity, targeting the poor is a matter of situating generation capacity in the right places and affordability is a matter of setting prices that allow for cost recovery without being excessively expensive for the poor.</p><p>This report can support decision-making for development and climate finance institutions, as well as private investors in Kenya seeking a pro-poor green electrification strategy. It shows how to target the poor, which electrification alternatives to use, at what price, whether or not this is commercially viable and which policies would be required to make it so.</p>

11 Jan 2017 05:12:56 GMT

What Explains the Allocation of Aid and Private Investment for Electrification?

<p>This paper aims to inform policy looking to step up investment in the electricity sector of developing countries and align it to other development goals such as universal access to energy or sustainability.</p><p>Three questions guide the analysis:</p><ul><li>How and why has private and donor finance for electrification changed across time?</li><li>What are the different motivations of private investors and donors as regards who and what gets financed?</li><li>Are sustainability and equitable access priorities for private and donor investment?&nbsp;</li></ul><p>These questions are addressed by describing finance flows during the period 1990–2010 and performing an econometric analysis to explain inter-country allocation.</p>

11 Jan 2017 03:02:42 GMT

Maximisation of Benefits for the Poor of Investments in Renewable Electricity: A Policy Tool for Project Planning

<p>Electricity improves users’ quality of life and can enable income generation when used for productive activities, hence supporting an escape from the poverty trap. Where generation comes from renewable sources, it also makes a positive contribution to low-carbon development; for many, this is a classic ‘win-win’ situation.</p><p>This report uses the evidence collected through a comprehensive literature review to develop a policy tool to maximise the poverty impact of electrification projects. It can be of use for development and climate finance institutions funding renewable energy projects in developing countries, and keen to enhance the poverty impacts of these projects.</p>

11 Jan 2017 02:56:58 GMT

Strengthening the Poverty Impact of Renewable Electricity Investments: Summary of E-Discussion

<p>On 19 and 20 March 2014 IDS convened an e-discussion on ‘strengthening the poverty impact of renewable electricity investments’. The event sought to instigate a global dialogue on what is required to maximise the poverty impact of clean electricity investments, as well as inform ongoing IDS work on this topic.</p><p>The e-discussion was structured around three threads:</p><ol><li>How strong is the evidence that electrification has an impact on poor people, and does this matter in decisions to finance renewable generation capacity projects?</li><li>How can the poverty impact of renewable generation capacity projects be maximised?</li><li>How can poverty eradication be introduced into the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) and climate finance agendas?</li></ol><p>This note summarises the contributions made by different participants in the e-discussion. It generalises the points most commonly raised around each thread and reflects specific points of strong consensus or contestation, but without identifying specific contributors by name. It also provides a project team reflection on how valuable the event was for our research and why.</p>

11 Jan 2017 02:47:57 GMT

Climatic trends, risk perceptions and coping strategies of smallholder farmers in rural Uganda

<p>Smallholder farmers in Uganda face a wide range of agricultural production risks, with climate change and variability presenting new risks and vulnerabilities. Climate related risks&nbsp; such as prolonged dry seasons have become more frequent and intense with negative impacts on agricultural livelihoods and food security.</p><p>This paper assesses farmers’ perceptions of climate change and variability and analyses historical trends in temperature and rainfall in two rural districts of Uganda in order to determine the major climate-related risks affecting crop and livestock production and to identify existing innovative strategies for coping with and adapting to climate-related risks, with potential for up-scaling in rural districts. The traditional coping strategies that have been developed by these communities overtime provide a foundation for designing effective adaptation strategies. <br /><br />Drought, disease and pest epidemics, decreasing water sources, lack of pasture, bush fires, hailstorms, changes in crop flowering and fruiting times were the major climate-related risks reported across the two districts. Farmers use a wide range of agricultural technologies and strategies to cope with climate change and climate variability. Mulching, intercropping and planting of food security crops were among the most common practices used. Other strategies included water harvesting for domestic consumption, other soil and water conservation technologies and on-farm diversification. Farmers often use a combination of these technologies and practices to enhance agricultural productivity. The average maximum temperatures increased across the two districts. Trends in average annual rainfall showed mixed results with a general decline in one district and a relatively stable trend in the other district. Perceived changes in climate included erratic rainfall onset and cessation, which were either early or late, poor seasonal distribution of rainfall and little rainfall. Farmers also reported variations in temperatures. Farmers’ perception of changing rainfall characteristics and increasing temperatures were consistent with the observed historical climatic trends from meteorological data.</p>

10 Jan 2017 12:18:51 GMT

Malawi summary of baseline studies: country report for the GFCS Adaptation Program in Africa

<div>This report reflects the summary of baseline findings in Malawi, under the auspices of the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) Adaptation Programme in Africa. It identifies gaps in climate information access and use at the local level, types of climate services farmers and pastoralists need in Malawi, relevant channels to reach farmers with requested services, lead-time and gender-specific requirements for the design and delivery of climate services that matter to farmers.</div><p>The analysis supports several recommendations for improving the supply, delivery, and iterative feedback and improvement of climate services in Malawi:</p><ul><li>to improve the supply of useful services, first develop climate service products to be responsive to farmer needs. Second, indicate value and integrate traditional indicators with the conventional climate forecasts to promote farmers’ use of scientific climate information in conjunction with their own indigenous knowledge. Finally, co-produce services with agricultural experts: establish a dialogue between national meteorology services, extension agents and farmers. This will represent an effective platform for relevant and useful climate services for farmers</li><li>to improve the delivery of climate information and advisories, climate information communication for farmers must rely on radio and extension workers both from government and NGOs. Extension agents should also be trained in understanding climate forecast concepts and integrate them into routine extension support</li><li>rigorous evaluation of climate services is a requirement for improving the usefulness of the services delivered. First, conduct post-season reviews to capture farmer feedback on received services. Second, continue to track climate information access and use at the local level, and changes against the baseline.&nbsp; </li></ul><p><br />This summary of CCAFS baseline findings from Malawi reveals the current state of climate information use at the local level, gaps and needs of farmers before they can benefit from improved science-based climate information, identifying the role of ICTs and rural radio to reach marginalized rural communities. It is hoped that these findings will offer valuable insights to the GFCS Adaptation Program in Africa, and future projects working to scale up relevant climate services for farmers and pastoralists in the country.&nbsp;</p>

10 Jan 2017 11:14:06 GMT

Tanzania summary of baseline studies: country report for the GFCS Adaptation Program in Africa

<p>This report reflects upon the consolidated findings from the baseline and scoping studies conducted under the auspices of Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) Adaptation Programme in Africa. It identifies gaps in climate information access and use at the local level, type of climate services farmers and pastoralists need in Tanzania, relevant channels to reach farmers with requested services, lead-time and gender specific requirements.</p><p>The analysis supports several recommendations for improving the supply, delivery, and iterative feedback and improvement of climate services in Tanzania:</p><ul><li>to improve the supply of useful services, first, co-produce climate services with farmers, and integrate indigenous knowledge with scientific climate forecasts to enhance relevance of climate information for local communities. Second, ensure timely delivery of accurate climate services, which is essential for these services to be useful to farmers and pastoralists for agricultural decision-making. Finally, downscale climate information to render it location specific, and make the service more relevant and credible for farmers</li><li>to improve the delivery of climate information and advisories, first, invest in good radio coverage.&nbsp; This is critical for the delivery of climate information as most households have access to climate information through radio. Second, diversify communication channels.&nbsp; This includes leveraging the power of ICTs (cell phones voice messages and reliance on village leaders) to reach all farmers with climate information, including women. Third, train government extension agents in understanding climate forecasts, and rely on these agents to deliver the information</li><li>rigorous evaluation of climate services is a requirement for improving the usefulness of the services. Conduct post-season reviews to capture farmer feedback on received services. Lastly, continue to track climate information access and use at the local level, and note changes against the baseline</li></ul><p><br />It is hoped that these findings will offer valuable insights to the GFCS Adaptation Program in Africa, and future projects working to scale up relevant climate services for farmers and pastoralists in Tanzania.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

10 Jan 2017 10:57:05 GMT

Towards policy integration of disaster risk, climate adaptation, and development in ASEAN: a baseline assessment

<div data-canvas-width="899.986665">This Insight attempts to create a baseline assessment of disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adap-</div><div data-canvas-width="305.19332999999995">tation (CCA) policies in ten Southeast Asian countries. More than 50 per cent of global disaster mortality occurred in</div><div data-canvas-width="459.5699733333334">Southeast Asia between 2004 and 2014, and four ASEAN member states are ranked in the top 10 countries most affected by climate risk between 1996 and 2015. The integration of relevant existing global mechanisms into national and local regulatory systems, and especially into national development plans, is therefore necessary to ensure the development of adaptive and resilience capacities. Although the region has realised the importance of streamlining DRR and CCA policies in development plans, a baseline of such efforts has yet to exist to date.</div><div data-canvas-width="459.5699733333334">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="459.5699733333334">&nbsp;</div>

10 Jan 2017 10:42:01 GMT

Crops, crop pests and climate change - why Africa needs to be better prepared

<div data-canvas-width="144.0334704">Ongoing investments in agriculture will not deliver for Africa until the destabilising nature of crop pest events, especially shock outbreak events, are addressed. As a result of climate change, the prevalence of crop pests will change and the frequency of shock pest events will increase, putting agricultural systems at risk. The granularity of these changes, in terms of choices by farmers, cropping systems and markets, presents a critical challenge.</div><div data-canvas-width="144.0334704">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="144.0334704">The following recommendations are put forward:</div><ul><li>build capacity of plant health organisations, as key partners at the front-line against crop pests, in support of food security, trade and policy implementation</li><li>improve data gathering, centred on better understanding of critical metrics of crop pest impacts, extending beyond yield loss and encompassing economic and investment factors to improve prediction capabilities</li><li>enhance the understanding of risk behaviours of food chain stakeholders and their willingness to invest and adapt, to support increased adoption of technologies</li><li>improve fusion of disparate datasets and risk modelling of crop pest consequences for projections on farmer choices and cropping system at the landscape scale, informed by markets and policy</li><li>invest in pre-emptive crop pest resistance breeding against future high risk pests based on current and futured geographic distributions in order to avoid the consequences of shock pest episodes</li><li>take cognizance of the boundary-less nature of crop pests, and develop&nbsp; regional supra-governmental capabilities for the analysis and articulation of horizon scanning and crop pest risk concerns under climate change</li></ul>

10 Jan 2017 04:22:59 GMT

Climate and livestock disease: assessing the vulnerability of agricultural systems to livestock pests under climate change scenarios

<p>Livestock as a sector is extremely important to the global economy and to rural livelihoods. As of 2013, there was an estimated 38 billion livestock in the world, or five animals for every person. Most (81%) were in developing countries. Around one billion smallholder farmers keep livestock, many of them women. The burden of animal disease in developing countries is high: livestock disease probably kills 20% of ruminants and more than 50% of poultry each year causing a loss of approximately USD 300 billion per year. Climate change can exacerbate disease in livestock, and some diseases are especially sensitive to climate change. Among 65 animal diseases identified as most important to poor livestock keepers, 58% are climate sensitive. Climate change may also have indirect effects on animal disease, and these may be greater than the direct effects. <br /><br />In order to address climate impacts on this sector, this paper makes the following recommendations: </p><ul><li>invest in ‘no regret’ adaptation responses. Many adaptation responses based on improving the control of climate sensitive livestock diseases are ‘no-regret’ options, which, by reducing the burden of livestock disease, will enhance community resilience, alleviate poverty and address global inequity irrespective of climate change</li><li>improve disease surveillance and response in order to detect changes in disease in a timely way, thus dramatically reducing the costs of response. This requires investment and innovation in disease reporting systems as well as laboratories capable of confirming diseases. Risk-based and participatory surveillance are promising options for improving disease reporting</li><li>increase the capacity to forecast near term occurrence of climate sensitive diseases, and to predict longer-term distribution of diseases through better epidemiological information and ground-truthed models</li><li>improve animal health service delivery by investing in the public sector and supporting innovations in the private sector such as community animal health workers linked to private veterinarians. Promote “One Health” and Ecohealth approaches to disease control, especially in vulnerable communities with high reliance on livestock (e.g. pastoralists in East Africa)</li><li>support eradication of priority diseases where this is economically justified. Develop diagnostics and vaccines, and promote adoption of good practices and strengthened biosecurity to improve disease control</li><li>increase the resilience of livestock systems by supporting diversification of livestock and livelihoods, and integrating livestock farming with agriculture. Consider promotion of species and breeds that are more resistant to disease and climate change</li><li>adopt breeding strategies focused on identifying and improving breeds that are better adapted to climate change impacts and disease</li><li>understand the potential land use changes in response to climate change and monitor their impacts on animal disease to allow preventive or remedial actions</li></ul>

10 Jan 2017 04:00:23 GMT

Mass displacement and the challenge for urban resilience

<div data-canvas-width="313.4366666666666">The concept of urban resilience is increasingly being used to describe the attributes of the urban system that are needed to deal with environmental disasters, conflict and financial crises. Large-scale, sudden population movements, prompted by both rapid-onset ‘natural’ disasters such as floods and ‘man-made’ disasters like conflict are on the rise, seeing increasing numbers of displaced people moving into urban areas. This represents a significant stress factor, in particular for towns and cities with already weak formal institutions that face difficulties in delivering adequate basic services to growing populations.</div><div data-canvas-width="313.4366666666666">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="313.4366666666666"><div data-canvas-width="197.11866666666666">The paper considers resilience to mass displacement in urban areas, focussing on the social and economic sub-systems – namely, shelter, health care and protection; basic service provision; economic development and employment; and social and political inclusion and community cohesion. It focuses on how well the urban system responds to new challenges and provides solutions for all residents. In particular, the paper finds that the resilience of an urban system cannot be understood without attention to the diverse experiences and needs of different groups within it: longer-term residents, new arrivals, temporary residents and, particularly, vulnerable groups.</div></div><div data-canvas-width="313.4366666666666">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="313.4366666666666">&nbsp;</div>

10 Jan 2017 02:54:01 GMT

Reaching more farmers: Innovative approaches to scaling up climate-smart agriculture

<p>The purpose of this working paper is to provide insight into how we can use novel approaches to scale up research findings on climate-smart agriculture (CSA) to meaningfully address the challenges of poverty and climate change. The approaches described include those based on value chains and private sector involvement, policy engagement, and information and communication technologies and agro-advisory services. The paper draws on 11 case studies to exemplify these new approaches to scaling up. These are synthesised using a simple conceptual framework that draws on a review of the most important challenges to scaling up. This provides the material for a discussion around how particular scaling up approaches can help to address some of the challenges of scaling up. The analysis offers insights into scaling approaches, challenges and some opportunities for scaling CSA practices and technologies. <br /><br />The authors conclude that multi-stakeholder platforms and policy making networks are key to effective upscaling, especially if paired with capacity enhancement, learning, and innovative approaches to support decision making of farmers. Projects that aim to intervene upstream at higher leverage points can be highly efficient and probably offer cost-effective dissemination strategies that reach across scales and include new and more diverse partnerships. However, these novel approaches still face challenges of promoting uptake, which remain contextualized and thus require a certain level of local engagement, while continuously paying attention to farmer’s needs and their own situations.</p>

06 Jan 2017 12:50:42 GMT

Display Next Eldis Climate Change [eldis.org]

The Nagoya Protocol on access to genetic resources and benefit sharing: User-country measures and implementation in India

<p>User-measure requirements are the cornerstone of the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization developed under the Convention on Biological Diversity. These have come about as the result of hard, persistent pressure from developing countries on developed countries to take co-responsibility in making the access and benefit sharing regime functional. The degree of national implementation of the user measure requirements will thus be an important indicator of the success of the Nagoya Protocol. This report reviews these requirements and the situations as regards national implementation so far. It reviews the&nbsp; status and options for India in its implementation and notes some future challenges.</p>

30 Nov 2016 05:22:23 GMT

The ocean and us: how healthy marine and coastal ecosystems support the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

<p>The ocean has been a cornerstone of human development throughout the history of civilization. People continue to come to the coasts to build some of the largest cities on the planet, with thriving economies, culture and communities. Ocean and coastal ecosystems provide us with resources and trade opportunities that greatly benefit human well-being.</p><p>These benefits are often taken for granted as we fail to recognize their underlying value. In our narrow pursuit of progress through purely economic and social development we often fail to protect the health of our marine system that we depend upon. Today, however, we increasingly realize the importance of healthy ecosystems for sustainable development that is reflected in the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) recently adopted by the United Nations. We can no longer afford to apply an antagonistic paradigm between development and conservation. The SDG framework provides the world with the opportunity to transform how we think about the ‘Oceans and Us’.</p><p>This publication highlights the critical contribution of healthy marine and coastal ecosystems to achieving the SDGs and describes the role of credible and accessible data, well communicated knowledge generated through dialogue with users, in supporting informed decision-making.</p>

23 Sep 2016 12:53:59 GMT

Mesophotic coral ecosystems - a lifeboat for coral reefs?

<p>The shallow coral reefs that we all know, are like the tip of an iceberg - they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit.&nbsp; The invisible reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) are widespread and diverse, however they remain largely unexplored in most parts of the world.&nbsp; With the global climate heating up, the world’s shallow coral reefs are predicted to experience increasing levels of catastrophic bleaching. This report asks the question – can MCEs provide a “life boat” for shallow coral reefs that are suffering decimation from rising sea surface temperatures and other anthropogenic impacts?</p><p>Picture a coral reef — most people will probably imagine brightly coloured corals, fish and other animals swimming in well-lit shallow waters. In fact, the coral reefs that live close to the surface of the sea — the ones that we can swim, snorkel, or dive near and see from space — are only a small portion of the complete coral reef ecosystem. Light-dependent corals can live in much deeper water (up to a depth of 150 m in clear waters). The shallow coral reefs from the surface of the sea to 30–40&nbsp; m below are more like the tip of an iceberg; they are the more visible part of an extensive coral ecosystem that reaches into depths far beyond where most people visit. These intermediate depth reefs, known as mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs), are the subject of this report.</p>

23 Sep 2016 01:49:16 GMT

Climate change threatens Hawaiian forest birds

<p>In Hawai'i, geograpahic isolation has prevented the natural establishment of mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and many insect species, such as biting mosquitoes. Isolation has also facilitated the spectacular evolutionary radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers from a single small flock of North American finches into more than 50 species and subspecies of endemic forest birds.</p><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942">With the arrival of humans came the clearing of forests and the introduction of non-native species and their diseases. More than 40 mosquito species have been intercepted in Hawai‘i, and six have become established, most recently in 2004.</div><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="66.57703962794942"><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158">As global warming raises air temperatures, their seasonal high elevation refuge will shrink and eventually disappear. It is likely that the spread of mosquitoes and avian malaria (as well as avian pox) into the high elevations of Hawai'i will eventually lead to the extinct ion of many, perhaps all, of the honeycreepers that currently survive in these areas.</div></div><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="138.95338297265158"><div data-canvas-width="205.90692343899823">Unfortunately, the rate of warming in Hawai‘i may not give these birds enough time to develop resistance. Without human assistance, global warming combined with avian malaria may overwhelm Hawai'i honeycreepers and other forest bird species.</div></div>

22 Sep 2016 10:23:43 GMT

CITES alone cannot combat illegal wildlife trade

<p>The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) will address the growing threat from illegal trade at its forthcoming Conference of the Parties (CoP17). CITES is a regulatory treaty that is neither self-executing nor legally binding unless its provisions are reproduced in member states’ laws. Approximately half the parties still need to develop legislation to strengthen their implementation of the convention; 10 of the 17 parties designated by the CITES Secretariat as needing priority attention are in Africa. There is thus opportunity to harmonise legal frameworks for more effective CITES implementation. While parties improve their environmental laws, the secretariat can foster transregional consensus on trade controls, improve synergy with other conventions in the context of environmental crime, prioritise support to CITES scientific and management authorities in high- biodiversity countries, especially those subject to trade suspensions for non-compliance, and recommend raising penalties for illegal transactions in wildlife commodities known to finance conflict.</p>

09 Sep 2016 02:56:25 GMT

The 2016 World Conservation Congress: exploring a win–win agenda for people and the planet

<div data-canvas-width="523.7833333333333">The World Conservation Congress (WCC), one of the world’s largest environmental gatherings, is convened every four years under the auspices of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) to find collaborative solutions to conserve global biodiversity and ecosystems, and harness the solutions nature offers to global development challenges.<br /><br /></div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">The WCC convenes in Honolulu, Hawai’i from 1–10 September 2016. The congress will include the IUCN’s 1 300 member organisations from across 161 countries, all seeking to develop the conservation and governance responses necessary to tackle the drivers of biodiversity loss. At the WCC, IUCN members representing government, the private sector and civil society will vote on motions and resolutions that lay out the global conservation agenda for the next four years. The 100 proposed motions are aligned with the overarching objectives of valuing and conserving nature, ensuring the effective and equitable governance of its use, and deploying nature-based solutions to global challenges in climate, food and development.</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">Recommendations:</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668"><ul><li>the IUCN, and its 2017-2020 Programme, must support the overarching objectives of the post-2015 UN development agenda and seek to establish an international framework for ecosystem-based climate action</li><li>African stakeholders must call for clearly identified roles and responsibilities, and associated action plans, to enhance the ownership of resolutions and support their implementation</li><li>African members must ensure consolidated voting positions, aligned with rigorous scientific data, which highlight the continent’s most important and vulnerable ecosystems and biodiversity</li></ul></div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="522.8166666666668">&nbsp;</div>

09 Sep 2016 02:48:52 GMT

Global climate change impacts on Pacific Islands terrestrial biodiversity: a review

<p>The islands of the Pacific region hold three of the 35 global biodiversity hotspots with large numbers of endemic species. Global climate change will exacerbate the challenges faced by the biodiversity of this region . In this review, the authors identify trends in characteristics for 305 terrestrial species threatened by climate change and severe weather according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). We then review the literature on observed and potential impacts of climate change on terrestrial biodive rsity , focusing on the species'€™ characteristics that were identified. High - elevation ecosystems such as cloud montane forests are projected to disappear entirely by the year 2100 , with corresponding global losses of their endemic biodiversity. Sea level ri se threatens restricted range species on small low - lying atolls. Shifts in distribution may be possible for generalist species , but r ange shifts will be difficult for species with small distributions, specialized habitat requirements, slow dispersal rates , and species at high elevations.</p><p>Accurate assessments of climate change impacts on biodiversity of the region are difficult because of confusion about nomenclature , the many species unknown to science, the lack of baseline data on species'€™ ecology and distributions, and lack of fine resolution elevation data for very small islands. Furthermore, synergistic interactions of climate change with other threats like habitat loss and invasive species have not been comprehensively assessed. Addressing these knowledge gaps will be difficult for Pacific island nations due to limited financial resources and expertise.</p>

18 Aug 2016 11:00:54 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Latin America and the Caribbean: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4, the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s global biodiversity goals<br />and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. <br /><br />This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. It is the second edition of the State of Biodiversity in<br />the Latin America and the Caribbean report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the Latin America and the Caribbean region.<br /><br />The report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other national and regional reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target-by-target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have beenbroken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken with key national institutions in the region. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets, which do not extend past 2011, have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but further efforts to update this information are needed.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in the Latin America and Caribbean region, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:<br /><br /></p><ul><li>declines in species abundance and high risks of species extinctions continue</li><li>rates of habitat loss in Latin America and the Caribbean have slowed but remain high</li><li>certain pressures associated with rapid economic growth and social inequities are impacting the region’s natural resources</li><li>agricultural expansion and intensification to increase both livestock, arable and commodities production continue</li><li>the region is undergoing major infrastructure development of dams and roads</li><li>the impacts on biodiversity of high concentrations of population in urban areas are particularly significant within the region</li><li>country economies within the region are very highly dependent on natural resources</li><li>resource extraction for minerals and hydrocarbons has, in some cases, led to locally devastating direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity such as vegetation removal, water and soil pollution and contamination</li><li>transboundary and local air pollution is now recognised as an environmental factor in human health in the region</li><li>climate change induced impacts on coral reefs and montane habitats within the region are now being observed</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:40:28 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4 (GBO-4), the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020, provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s global biodiversity goals and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. <br /><br />This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. This is the second edition of The State of Biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets for the Asia Pacific region.<br /><br />The report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the CBD, other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets which do not extend past 2011 have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but that further efforts to update this information are needed.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in the region, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:</p><ul><li>the exceptional biodiversity in Asia and the Pacific continues to decline</li><li>combinations of human-induced factors are a key driver of biodiversity loss</li><li>Asia and the Pacific continue to experience deforestation and forest degradation</li><li>rapid growth in demand for wildlife products is fuelling unsustainable trade, with impacts inside and outside of the region</li><li>invasive alien species create particular pressures on the oceanic islands</li><li>marine ecosystems are vulnerable to growth in commercial and artisanal fisheries</li><li>te negative impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are exacerbating the effects of other pressures on Asia and the Pacific’s biodiversity</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:26:47 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in West Asia: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4 (GBO-4), the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 , published by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), provides a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan’s biodiversity goals and associated twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contains limited regional information.</p><p>This second edition of the State of Biodiversity in West Asia report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment, serving as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the West Asia region specifically. This report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for the Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken.</p><p>The key messages about the state of biodiversity in West Asia, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:<br /><br /></p><ul><li>available biodiversity and ecosystem service information for the region is limited, which has made the reporting task challenging, and in many cases data are too poor and fragmentary to allow robust conclusions</li><li>the major drivers of biodiversity decline have seen a rapid increase, including urban expansion, the spread of intensive agricultural systems and cultivation of marginal land resulting from considerable population growth. Such changes necessitate reliance on resources imported from elsewhere in the world, meaning that West Asia’s ecological footprint is growing sharply and now exceeds the global average</li><li>the volatile political situation in parts of the region means&nbsp; conservation work has been unable to proceed in the countries or areas experiencing significant internal and international conflicts and political instability in recent years</li><li>protected areas networks in West Asia are limited in both coverage and management effectiveness</li><li>wildlife crime linked to hunting is a continuing problem with ineffective enforcement of regulations and legislation</li><li>water scarcity, driven by rapidly rising demand, is threatening the survival of the region’s wetland habitats</li><li>multiple anthropogenic and climatic pressures are interacting to threaten the integrity of marine ecosystems</li><li>the region is likely to be one of the hardest hit by the direct and indirect impacts of climate change such as sea level rise, sea temperature rise, increasing water scarcity and ground water salinity, and desertification</li></ul>

16 Aug 2016 04:17:22 GMT

The State of Biodiversity in Africa: a mid-term review of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets

<p>Global Biodiversity Outlook-4, the mid-term review of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 , provided a global assessment of progress towards the attainment of the Plan'€™s global biodiversity goals and associated Aichi Biodiversity Targets, but contained limited regional information. This report builds on and complements the global GBO-4 assessment. It is the second edition of the State of Biodiversity in Africa report and serves as a near mid-term review of progress towards the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 for the African region.</p><p>This report draws on a set of regional indicators, information from fifth national reports to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), other government reports, case studies and published literature, to provide a target by target review of progress towards the twenty Aichi Biodiversity Targets. As much as possible, global indicators for Aichi Biodiversity Targets have been broken down to regional level and some additional analyses of existing global information have been undertaken. However, limitations in data have meant that some datasets which do not extend past 2011 have been included to illustrate that relevant information exists, but that further efforts to update this information.</p><div data-canvas-width="233.58124999999998">The key messages about the state of biodiversity in Africa, and the pressures upon it, which have emerged from this assessment are:</div><div data-canvas-width="295.27616666666665"><ul><li>overall, biodiversity in Africa continues to decline, with ongoing losses of species and habitats</li><li>ongoing loss of biodiversity in Africa is driven by a combination of human-induced factors</li><li>Africa’s freshwater ecosystems and their biodiversity are especially threatened</li><li>Africa continues to experience deforestation and forest degradation</li><li>the negative impacts of climate change on species and ecosystems are exacerbating the effects of all these pressures</li><li>nonetheless the report identifies a number of important responses which have taken place since 2011</li><li>African countries are working collaboratively to address particular Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>there is a growing portfolio of international support for African countries to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>African countries are using ecosystem service valuation and investment in REDD+ to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets</li><li>many African countries have already achieved their 17% terrestrial protected area targets, and many others are working towards this target on land, as well as on the 10% marine protected areas target on the sea</li><li>Africa is making increasing use of ecosystem-based conservation and restoration of natural resources</li></ul></div>

16 Aug 2016 04:05:56 GMT

Seeing through fishers' lenses: Exploring marine ecological changes within Mafia Island Merine Park, Tanzania

<p>nsights from traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of the marine environment are difficult to integrate into conventional science knowledge (CSK) initiatives. Where TEK is integrated into CSK at all, it is usually either marginalized or restricted to CSK modes of interpretation, hence limiting its potential contribution to the understanding of social-ecological systems. This study uses semi-directive interviews, direct observations, and structured open-ended questionnaires (n = 103) to explore TEK of marine ecological changes occurring within the Mafia Island Marine Park, Tanzania, and factors contributing to these changes. It illuminates TEK insights that can be valuable in parallel with CSK to provide a more nuanced understanding of ecological changes. In some areas, fishers observed coral reef growth, increased fish abundance, and increased sea temperatures, whereas in others, they reported decreases in sea level, coral cover, fish abundance, catch composition, catch quantities, and fish size. They associated these changes with interrelated factors emanating from environmental processes, conservation outcomes, marketing constraints, population dynamics, and disappearance of cultural traditions. Utilizing TEK without restricting it to CSK modes of interpretation has the potential to improve CSK initiatives by promoting complementarity and mutual enrichment between the two kinds of knowledge, thereby contributing new insights that may enhance adaptive management and resilience in social-ecological systems.</p>

12 Jun 2016 09:06:59 GMT

Dry-season greening of Amazon forests

<p>Evidence from ecological studies, eddy flux towers, and satellites shows that many tropical forests &lsquo;green up&rsquo; during higher sunlight annual dry seasons, suggesting they are more limited by light than water. Morton et al.reported that satellite-observed dry-season green up in Amazon forests is an artefact of seasonal variations in sun- sensor geometry.</p><p>However, here these researchers argue that even after artefact correction, data from Morton et al. show statistically significant increases in canopy greenness during the dry season. Integrating corrected satellite with ground observations indicates that dry-season forest greening is prevalent in Amazonia, probably reflecting large-scale seasonal upregulation of photosynthesis by canopy leaf dynamics.</p><p>[adapted from source]</p>

21 Mar 2016 07:31:29 GMT

Spotlight on publications: Brazil’s ethanol programme

<p>This Spotlight highlights some of the key publications that study, analyse and document Brazil&rsquo;s ethanol programme. The publications focus on the following specific issues: Brazilian government policies to promote the sector; sustainability issues; expansion, land use and agro-ecological zoning of sugarcane; bagasse, cogeneration and bioelectricity; and advanced biofuels. Together these resources highlight the current key issues surrounding the sector, offering a useful entry for readers from other regions who wish to understand the Brazilian experience with ethanol.</p>

16 Mar 2016 03:19:51 GMT

Traditional gender roles of men and women in natural resource conservation among the vhavenda people in Zimbabwe: implications for sustainable development

<p>Natural resource conservation is key to the concept of sustainable development, yet environmental pressures continue to increase, including soil degradation, water availability, and nutrient cycling. Within natural resource conservation, women play an equally essential, yet differentiated, role as men. This means that analysis of gender interactions in relation to environmental management is imperative for sustainable development. To this end, this journal paper explores&nbsp;the traditional gender roles of men and women in the conservation of natural resources among the vhavenda people in Zimbabwe. It seeks to draw lessons regarding participation, particularly of women, that can inform wider sustainable development efforts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>African feminism and post- colonial theory were used as theoretical frameworks to analyse the practices of the vhavenda, while a Harvard analytic framework and the social relation approach to gender analysis were used as tools to map the gender roles in their conservation activities. The research also used a phenomenological research approach as part of the purely qualitative study, to ensure that understanding emerged directly from the experiences of the men and women themselves. In-depth, unstructured interviews were conducted with respondents aged seventy and above, with five females and three males interviewed in the Beit-Bridge district in south west Zimbabwe. This demographic was chosen for their extensive knowledge of traditional methods.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The research revealed that the type of resources that were of concern to the vhavenda people included soil, water, and specific plant species that were important sources of firewood, timber, and food. Certain trees are conserved for sacred and cultural reasons, with rules as to who can cut down trees, and how. Conservation of water was not gendered, with both men and women participating in actions such as fencing off water-sources from animals. Soil degradation prevention takes precedence over correction, with men cutting terraces to prevent soil erosion, and women planting grasses. Animal species conservation depended on availability, importance, and use, while the study also revealed that although women and men had different uses and benefits from natural resources, there was an ethic of cooperation, dialogue, and collaboration among men and women when it comes to resource conservation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The study recommends that natural resource conservation in the context of sustainable development, that is, using modern technologies and methods, needs to embrace some of the practices of the vhavenda. these include complementarity, cooperation, inclusiveness, dialogue, and negotiation between men and women. In promoting equal participation between genders, this approach will help to overcome some of the barriers of participation seen elsewhere, especially unequal gender relations that cause gendered subordination.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

05 Mar 2016 04:09:22 GMT

Display Next Eldis Biodiversity [eldis.org]

The water challenge: OECD's response

The OECD work on water analyses how water management can contribute to sustainable growth and development, with a focus on financing water services and infrastructure, managing water related risks (including scarcity and pollution), and urban water management. A new Recommendation on water has been adopted by the OECD Council on 13 December 2016.

Wed, 04 Jan 2017 08:43:00 GMT

Action on climate change

The OECD has a long experience of exchanging knowledge and good practices through effective, policy-orientated and collaborative initiatives. The OECD is helping countries with policy analysis and guidance to implement NDCs and prepare their action plans on climate change mitigation and adaptation. How is the OECD supporting action on climate change? Find out more.

Tue, 03 Jan 2017 10:37:00 GMT

Greater efforts needed to safeguard biodiversity

The world must ramp up its efforts to use natural resources more sustainably and conserve biological diversity and the ecosystems on which we depend for human life, the OECD today told participants at the COP13 Convention on Biological Diversity in Cancun, Mexico.

Wed, 07 Dec 2016 17:51:00 GMT

Mainstream biodiversity

The OECD has been working on the economies and policies for biodiversity for more than two decades, providing a platform for exchanging knowledge and good practice insights. The OECD is helping countries with analysis for more environmentally-effective, cost-efficient and distributionally-equitable policies for biodiversity conservation and sustainable use. Find out more.

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 11:56:00 GMT

OECD at #COP22

The UN Climate Change Conference (COP22) was held in Bab Ighli, Marrakech, Morocco from 7-18 November 2016. Check out the OECD's contributions and our programme of side events to the conference.

Mon, 07 Nov 2016 10:33:00 GMT

Making climate finance work for women: Overview of bilateral ODA to gender and climate change

This brief is a contribution to the 22nd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) and a submission of recommendations for the renewal of the Lima Work Programme on Gender. It provides an overview of how well members of the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) are integrating gender equality into their bilateral aid to climate change.

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 11:58:00 GMT

Global Forum on Environment and Economic Growth

This Global Forum, held on 24-25 October 2016, aimed to shed light on the links between environment and economic growth, and the toolkits to quantify these links. It provided a platform to explore how a well-managed natural environment can contribute to economic growth and how an effective and efficient regulatory system can best be designed?

Mon, 24 Oct 2016 09:52:00 GMT

3rd OECD Green Investment Financing Forum

Building on the success of the previous Green Investment Financing Forums, the OECD held its 3rd Forum on 13-14 October 2016 in Tokyo, Japan. This year’s edition focused on Asia – a region with rapidly growing economies, developing financial markets and colossal green investment needs.

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 19:01:00 GMT

Effective Carbon Rates - OECD Insigths Blog

On the latest OECD Insights blog post, Mr. Kurt van Dender, Head of the Tax and Environment Unit at the OECD’s Centre for Tax Policy and Administration explains the necessary requirements to deeply cut greenhouse gas emissions in order to implement the COP21 Paris Agreement.

Tue, 11 Oct 2016 14:55:00 GMT

OECD Meeting of Environment Ministers

‌Environment Ministers from OECD and key partner countries gathered in Paris on 28-29 September 2016 to discuss the environmental challenges facing the world and how to promote effective and efficient policy responses, under the guidance of the Chair, Minister Nick Smith (New Zealand) and the Vice-Chairs, Minister Irena Majcen (Slovenia) and Vice-Minister Marcelo Mena Carrasco (Chile).

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 18:41:00 GMT

Carbon pricing efforts are falling short, but even modest collective action can deliver significant progress, OECD says

Current carbon prices are falling short of the levels needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions driving climate change, but even moderate price increases could have a significant impact, according to new OECD research.

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 11:00:00 GMT

Air pollution: Tyre and brake fatigue compound an exhausting problem

Anyone else feeling exhausted by all this drum humming about air pollution? Indeed it appears the fumes won’t be dissipating any time soon as we consider the extent to which tyre and brake rubbish exacerbate the problem.

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 08:13:00 GMT

Conference on Transition to the green economy

This event, with involvement from the OECD, on 6-7 September 2016, is of major strategic nature during the Slovak Presidency of the European Council. Its ambition is to improve understanding of the green economy concept, identify conclusions and pathways for transition as well as to involve and mobilise various actors and stakeholders in the discussions of possible future actions.

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 09:38:00 GMT

OECD welcomes ground-breaking peer reviews by China and US of their fossil fuel subsidies

The OECD has welcomed the release by China and the US of peer reviews of their fossil fuel subsidies.

Mon, 05 Sep 2016 11:05:00 GMT

The climate scientist and the teacher - Insights blog

Climate change is not just about a change in climate towards hotter, wetter, and drier conditions, but also about an increase in the variability of the climate, as well as in the number and severity of extreme events.

Fri, 26 Aug 2016 13:18:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Environment [oecd.org]

Rio+20: A voice from Sheffield, UK

Ruby Smith, 21, is a support planning co-ordinator for Sheffield Council, in Sheffield, UKRio+20 is a unique and historic opportunity for world leaders to prioritise development and plan a better world for future generations.I would like to ask delegates to remember the importance of putting...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Rio+20: A voice from Bosnia and Herzegovina

Seida Saric is country director for Women for Women International in Bosnia and HerzegovinaFoundations of any development rest on active and equal participation of both men and women in social, political and economic spheres of life. Women play a much more active role which, in turn, does not have...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

This policy brief, produced by Care International, outlines a bilateral Reduced Emissions form Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) pilot project ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Letter

This letter is written by the Executive Chair of Indonesia's National Council on Climate Change, Rachmat Witoelar; it outlines Indonesia's Nationally ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Readiness Preparation Proposals (R - PP)

This document was submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), a World Bank programme that aims to assist developing countries with Reduced ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Cities and Resilience

This policy brief highlights the key issues discussed at the Cities and Resilience Dialogue held in Bangkok, Thailand, in September 2009. The event assessed ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Kalimantan Forests and Climate Partnership

This policy brief, produced by Care International, outlines a bilateral Reduced Emissions form Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) pilot project ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Letter

This letter is written by the Executive Chair of Indonesia's National Council on Climate Change, Rachmat Witoelar; it outlines Indonesia's Nationally ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Readiness Preparation Proposals (R - PP)

This document was submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), a World Bank programme that aims to assist developing countries with Reduced ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Asia-Pacific Regional Climate Change Adaptation Assessment

This report discusses the climate change adaptation needs of the Asia-Pacific region; it was undertaken in order to inform USAID's Regional Development ...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

The doughnut can help Rio+20 see sustainable development in the round | Kate Raworth

Resource use has both an environmental ceiling and a social foundation, below which lies deprivation, but the doughnut-shaped space between the two demands our attentionIn 2009, Johan Rockström of the Stockholm Resilience Centre brought together some of the world's leading Earth-system scientists...

2012-06-16T00:00:00-00:00

Rio+20 Earth summit: walkout at 'green economy' talks

Negotiators from developing countries insist wealthy nations must help fund their move to sustainable developmentEurope's financial crisis should not be used as an excuse for inaction and underfunding of moves towards a more sustainable global economy, a senior Brazilian diplomat warned at the...

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

U.S. proposes tighter rules on soot pollution

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Obama administration proposed stricter standards to control harmful soot from heavy industry on Friday, a move expected to save lives but which drew criticism from Republicans and industry worried the costs of compliance will hurt the economy.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Analysis: CO2 market has failed to promote cleaner energy

LONDON (Reuters) - Europe's emissions trading scheme has failed to create incentives for utilities to use cleaner energy fuels, meaning that governments will have to switch to simpler tools, such as subsidies and regulation, to enforce emissions reduction targets.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Australia cuts number of firms to pay carbon tax

CANBERRA (Reuters) - Australia will levy a controversial carbon tax on about half the number of companies originally expected, a government list released on Friday shows, which may limit the economic and political impact of the tax which starts on July 1.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Cities Bet They Can Curb Traffic With Games of Chance

To tackle congestion, clogged urban centers are testing the lure of prizes to persuade motorists to change their driving habits.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Africa: Can Rio+20 Create a Climate of Change for Poor Communities?

[AlertNet]Climate change is often described in numbers - degrees of temperature rise, metric tonnes of carbon emissions. These numbers add up to devastating consequences: erratic rainfall, crop failure, hunger. But climate change also has a human face.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Africa: Seizing the Opportunity for a Sustainable Future

[AlertNet]The 1992 Earth Summit was a bright moment for the environmental movement. For the first time, presidents and prime ministers - more than 100 in all - were "coming together to save the earth," as a headline on the cover of Time magazine put it.

2012-06-15T00:00:00-00:00

Display Next Earthwire Climate [earthwire.org]

World Business

Davos: Hammond admits 'Brexit fog' impact on investment

The chancellor says Brexit uncertainty may delay some investment, but the pound's fall is attracting foreign firms.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 15:00:18 GMT

Osborne to join investment giant BlackRock as adviser

Former chancellor George Osborne is hired to advise the world's largest fund manager, BlackRock.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 16:45:30 GMT

China's economy grows 6.7% in 2016

The figure meets Beijing's forecasts, but some say growth is slower than the official data suggests.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 08:46:46 GMT

Heineken in talks to buy Kirin's Brazilian beer brewer

Heineken says it is in negotiations with Japanese group Kirin to buy its Brazilian beer business.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 09:08:41 GMT

Petrobras fraud judge dies in plane crash

Supreme Court judge Teori Zavascki was in charge of investigating corruption at state oil giant Petrobras.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 00:41:03 GMT

UK retail sales fall in December

Retail sales in December saw the biggest monthly fall for more than four and a half years.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 11:26:44 GMT

Paramount gets $1bn Chinese funding

The US film studio says the investment from two backers will help its expansion and fund future movies.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 03:30:10 GMT

Mnuchin defends record during treasury secretary hearing

Donald Trump's choice of treasury secretary, Steven Mnuchin, defends his record during Capitol Hill grilling.

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 19:21:32 GMT

May's 'positive discussion' with banks

Theresa May has had 'positive' discussions with banks about their future presence in London, she told the BBC.

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 18:15:01 GMT

Toshiba shares crash as nuclear writedown crisis deepens

Shares in Japanese conglomerate Toshiba dive as investors fear a huge loss from a US nuclear deal.

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 12:03:03 GMT

Ex-VW boss 'did not know' of emissions cheat device

Martin Winterkorn says he did not know about VW's emissions cheat until it became public.

Thu, 19 Jan 2017 11:55:35 GMT

BBC World News business headlines

The latest international business headlines from BBC World News.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:48:25 GMT

Hammond: UK-US ties to 'prosper' under Trump

Chancellor Philip Hammond says the UK's relationship with the Trump administration will "prosper", but he warns against short-term thinking.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 14:40:38 GMT

Will Trump's corporate 'tax holiday' plans hit Ireland?

Proposed tax incentives could encourage some US companies to leave Ireland and return home.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 10:47:19 GMT

Nigeria's kids' clothing seamstress-turned-entrepreneur

Adenike Ogunlesi found an exciting market for kids' clothing through her fashion label Ruff 'n' Tumble.

Fri, 20 Jan 2017 12:23:21 GMT

Display Next World Business from BBC News [bbc.co.uk/news]

Kuwait- Defense Min. receives naval hardware from UAE firm

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) ABU DHABI, Jan 18 (KUNA) -- The Ministry of Defense received on Wednesday a naval ship from UAE company "Abu Dhabi Ship Building" (ADSB), part ...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

Kuwait- Qatari Amir meets with humanitarian dignitaries

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) DOHA, Jan 18 (KUNA) -- Qatari Amir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani met with a number of humanitarian work dignitaries in Doha on Wednesday. H...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

Kuwait- His Highness Premier receives former German Chancellor

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) KUWAIT, Jan 18 (KUNA) -- His Highness the Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber Al-Mubarak Al-Hamad Al-Sabah received former Chancellor of the Federal Re...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

Kuwait- His Highness Premier receives new water company's stockholders

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) KUWAIT, Jan 18 (KUNA) -- His Highness the Prime Minister Sheikh Jaber Al-Mubarak Al-Hamad Al-Sabah received stockholders of a newly established...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

Kuwait- KUNA main news for Wednesday, January 18, 2017

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) Local: KUWAIT -- Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Interior Sheikh Khaled Al-Jarrah Al-Sabah meets Secretary General of the Arab Interior...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

Kuwait- Cabinet Min. wowed by student projects

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) KUWAIT, Jan 18 (KUNA) -- Minister of State for Cabinet Affairs Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah Al-Mubarak Al-Sabah on Wednesday commended students of ...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

Kuwait- Interior Minister meets Arab Interior Ministers' Council chief

(MENAFN - Kuwait News Agency (KUNA)) KUWAIT, Jan 18 (KUNA) -- Deputy Prime Minister and Interior Minister Sheikh Khaled Al-Jarrah Al-Sabah tackled on Wednesday with Secretary Gener...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:15:57 GMT

May puts Britain on course for 'hard' Brexit

(MENAFN - Muscat Daily) London- Prime Minister Theresa May unveiled her Brexit blueprint on Tuesday, announcing for the first time that Britain will leave Europe's single market i...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:10:24 GMT

Air strike on displaced camp in Nigeria 'kills 52'

(MENAFN - Muscat Daily) Kano - At least 52 aid workers and civilians were killed on Tuesday when an air force jet accidentally bombed a camp in northeast Nigeria instead of Boko H...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:10:25 GMT

Oman- Q&A on the MH370 mystery

(MENAFN - Muscat Daily) Sydney- Almost three years after Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 disappeared with 239 people aboard, the most expensive underwater search in history has bee...

Wed, 18 Jan 2017 09:10:25 GMT

Display Next MENAFN Regional Business [menafn.com]

An inclusive South Africa needs more investment and jobs

South Africa has made impressive social progress over the past two decades, lifting millions of people out of poverty and broadening access to essential services like water, electricity and sanitation.

Fri, 17 Jul 2015 13:00:00 GMT

Employment situation, first quarter 2015, OECD

OECD employment rate increases to 66.1% in first quarter of 2015

Thu, 16 Jul 2015 09:19:00 GMT

La OCDE establece la hoja de ruta para la adhesión de Costa Rica

La OCDE ha definido las pautas encaminadas a la adhesión de Costa Rica a la Organización, reforzando así su compromiso de dar cabida a nuevos países miembros.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 15:00:00 GMT

OECD establishes roadmap for membership with Costa Rica

The OECD set out a clear path for Costa Rica’s accession to the Organisation, reinforcing the OECD’s commitment to further extend its global membership.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 14:00:00 GMT

Countries should address disruptive effects of the digital economy

Countries are making increased efforts to develop their digital economies in a way that will maximise social and economic benefits, but now need to address the risk of disruption in areas like privacy and jobs, according to a new OECD report.

Wed, 15 Jul 2015 11:00:00 GMT

OECD holds three tax events in Addis to promote domestic resource mobilisation

The OECD is holding three tax events on the side-lines of the 3rd International Conference on Financing for Development in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Mon, 13 Jul 2015 21:01:00 GMT

Tax Inspectors Without Borders:OECD and UNDP to work with developing countries to make tax audits more effective

The OECD and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) have launched a new initiative to help developing countries bolster domestic revenues by strengthening their tax audit capacities.

Mon, 13 Jul 2015 11:00:00 GMT

OECD establishes roadmap for membership with Lithuania

The OECD set out a clear path for Lithuania’s accession to the Organisation, reinforcing the OECD’s commitment to further extend its global membership.

Fri, 10 Jul 2015 12:01:00 GMT

Jobs outlook improving slowly but millions risk being trapped at bottom of economic ladder

The jobs recovery is slowly gathering pace, but employment will remain well below pre-crisis levels in many countries, especially in Europe, through to the end of 2016, according to a new OECD report.

Thu, 09 Jul 2015 10:00:00 GMT

Composite Leading Indicators (CLI), OECD, July 2015

Composite leading indicators continue to point to growth convergence in most major economies

Wed, 08 Jul 2015 09:23:00 GMT

Canada could do more to help laid-off workers

Canada should improve the support its employment services offer to help laid-off workers find a new job more quickly, according to a new OECD report.

Tue, 07 Jul 2015 15:00:00 GMT

Slow growth in health spending but Europe lags behind

Many European countries saw further reductions in health spending in 2013, according to OECD Health Statistics 2015. Health spending continued to shrink in Greece, Italy and Portugal in 2013. Most countries in the European Union reported real per capita health spending below the levels of 2009. Outside of Europe, health spending has been growing at around 2.5% per year since 2010.

Tue, 07 Jul 2015 10:00:00 GMT

Relaunch productivity to boost growth and well-being

The slowdown in productivity over the past decade has added to concerns about the long-term economic outlook. But new OECD research shows that policy reforms can revive the diffusion of innovation and make better use of human talent to clear the path for higher and more inclusive productivity growth.

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 17:00:00 GMT

More effort needed on government integrity to help restore public trust

Countries need to do more to identify and reduce conflicts of interest and other breaches of integrity to help win back trust in national governments, which surveys suggest remains below pre-crisis levels, according to a new OECD report.

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 12:46:00 GMT

Contributions to GDP growth: first quarter 2015, Quarterly National Accounts, OECD

Private consumption, main driver of OECD GDP growth in the first quarter of 2015

Mon, 06 Jul 2015 09:35:00 GMT

Display Next OECD News [oecd.org]

Economic Development

The closing of democratic space for trade unions

Weakening of workers' rights in most regions is being aggravated by severe crackdowns on freedom of speech and assembly, according to the 2016 Global Rights Index. Restrictions on freedom of speech and assembly, including severe crackdowns in some countries, increased by 22%, with 50 out of 141 countries surveyed recording restrictions.

Agenda for transformation, solidarity, democracy

The year 2015 was marked on the one hand by the inability of the European Union (EU) to emerge from the crisis, and on the other by a dramatic rise in the number of people taking flight from their homes and from their homelands, because of wars and terrorist attacks, in many cases caused by the destructive policies of the EU and of its member states.

Global economy faces major headwinds in 2016

The world economy stumbled in 2015 and only a modest improvement is projected for 2016/17 as a number of cyclical and structural headwinds persist, says the United Nations World Economic Situation and Prospects (WESP) 2016 report. Global growth is estimated at a mere 2.4% in 2015.

The Latin American Left is losing ground

Within a few weeks leftwing governments in Latin America have experienced a breath-taking decline. The Latin American (centre-) left forces suffered several strategic defeats. They occurred in the biggest Latin American economies. First in Argentina, than in Venezuela, and also in Brazil the days of an uncontested majority of left forces are definitely over now.

The World Bank's new Gender Equality strategy

14 years after their previous strategy on gender mainstreaming, the WBG has decided to develop a new Gender Equality (GE) Strategy. This briefing document presents WIDE+ critical reflections and key recommendations to enhance the new World Bank Group's (WBG) strategy on Gender Equality.

Greece: Merkel's victory - a Pyrrhic victory?

The Euro Zone Summit on 12-13 July 2015 forced the Greek Syriza-led government into accepting practically all demands of the other euro zone states. In return, the Greek government received the prospect that negotiations on renewed credit programme might commence and the vague promise that longer grace and payment periods on the Greek debt might be considered.

Greek crisis out of control

Everything is possible. The crisis has reached such a precipitating dynamics, that nobody is able to fully control the process. There might still come a last minute muddling through compromise. But there might also be insolvency and a subsequent Grexit either by accident or by intention.

Fight tax avoidance and reform investment policies

Two crucial issues are dealt with in the new World Investment Report: A fundamental reform of the international investment regime and more coherence between international tax and investment policies. According to the authors of the report there must be no contradiction between the policy imperative of taking action against tax avoidance and facilitating productive investment in sustainable development.

New labour standard for the informal economy

At its 104th conference in the first half of June, the International Labour Organization (ILO) has adopted a new international labour standard that is expected to help hundreds of millions of workers and economic units move out of informality and into the formal economy.

Rehabilitating the c word

What do the writer-activist Naomi Klein, the academic economist Thomas Piketty, the art curator Okwui Enwezor and the Catholic Pope have in common? A cosmopolitan lifestyle? Concern for humanity? A knack for controversy? All of that. But something more substantive too.

Display Next WDEV World Economy & Development [wdev.eu]

Trilateral cooperation in a changing international development landscape

<div data-canvas-width="34.91666666666667">This special edition of Global Dialogue, focused on trilateral cooperation in a changing global development landscape, forms part of a research project undertaken by the Institute for Global Dialogue (IGD), with the financial support of the United Kingdom (UK) Department for International Development (DFID). The research project sought to provide critical insight into the international politics of development diplomacy and its implications for South Africa. This special edition on trilateral cooperation is essentially a collection of some of the short articles produced during the project cycle, and forms part of a series of publications by the IGD focused on this important area of academic inquiry. The publication also includes summaries of presentations given at the various development diplomacy symposia and workshops in Pretoria and Cape Town in 2015 and 2016.</div>

20 Jan 2017 03:16:54 GMT

Emerging trends in Africa’s electoral processes

<div data-canvas-width="398.7833333333334">The quest for competitive elections in Africa, with the modest gains made since the 1990s towards deepening</div><div data-canvas-width="138.70000000000002">democratisation, continues to underpin the continent’s efforts to create stable and growing democracies. Since the post-Cold War transition from single-party to multiparty systems, most African countries have embraced elections as their preferred option for power transfer. Drawing especially on AU election observation mission reports, this policy briefing examines trends emerging from elections held in 2015 and 2016, and calls for extensive structural, legal and policy reforms. It argues that adherence to and implementation of the AU treaty and non-treaty standards for democratic elections are key to further strengthening electoral processes in Africa.</div><div data-canvas-width="138.70000000000002">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="138.70000000000002">Recommendations:</div><div data-canvas-width="138.70000000000002"><div data-canvas-width="249.71666666666667"><ul><li>the AU in collaboration with RECs should develop guidelines for constitutional revisions to give effect to Article 10 of the ACDEG</li><li>electoral calendars must be respected and changes must be mutually agreed by all stakeholders to protect the sanctity of electoral processes</li><li>inter- and intra-political party dialogues remain key in safeguarding electoral democracy and deepening political pluralism in AU member states</li><li>governments should develop and adopt social media codes of conduct for elections to protect the fundamental rights to access to information and expression</li><li>political parties should undertake reforms to address structural exclusion and guarantee equal participation of young people, women and other marginalised groups in political and electoral processes</li></ul></div></div>

20 Jan 2017 03:02:05 GMT

Indian economy and demonetisation: way forward

<div data-canvas-width="329.08883333333335">The delegalisation of the two highest value currency notes announced by Indian government on November 8th 2016 has created an impact on the economy at a scale which no other piece of policy has rivalled for a long time.</div><div data-canvas-width="329.08883333333335">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="329.08883333333335">This brief tlooks at the rationale of the measure and scans it for lessons learnt. The analysis will also pay particular attention to the role of digital money and corresponding role of paper money.<br /><br />There are also two more concerns which are touched upon in this study:<br /><ul><li>globally the subject of cash as a physical currency versus its arrival as an electronic medium has become very relevant in the 21st century. One of the first large scale application of the principle was through the launch of Bitcoin. More such, are in the offing. Those create a vast and undefined region for economic analysis to venture into </li><li>at a more basic level as economies of Asia and, particularly Africa find themselves rising up the growth path, they have been assailed by the impact of inequality and corruption that a growing economy without sufficient regulatory control are subjected to. The medium for such deviant practices are often based on manipulation of the cash economy. </li></ul></div><div data-canvas-width="329.08883333333335">Does the Indian demonetisation experiment have any lessons to offer in this context?</div><div data-canvas-width="329.08883333333335">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="329.08883333333335">&nbsp;</div>

20 Jan 2017 02:51:40 GMT

Child Under-weight and Agricultural Productivity in India: Implications for Public Provisioning and Women’s Agency

<p>The well-known pathways that link agriculture to child nutrition are food, quality of food, and care of feeding. Further, agricultural productivity growth contributes significantly to poverty reduction and reduction in child undernutrition. Care of children and feeding practices depend upon women’s knowledge, and hence women’s education and their freedom to act are closely related to child nutrition.</p><div data-canvas-width="644.7333333333331">A recent global hunger index indicated a 12 percent decline in child underweight rates. This study attempts an empirical explanation of the factors that influence child underweight rates at the district level.</div><div data-canvas-width="644.7333333333331">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="644.7333333333331"><div data-canvas-width="644.3499999999996">The aim of the paper is to look at the association of the proportion of underweight children, with the overall agricultural productivity, women’s agency, child and maternal health status, and the available public services across 430 districts in India with the help of linear regressions and quantile regressions.</div></div><div data-canvas-width="644.3499999999996">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="644.3499999999996">Agricultural land productivity, share of women educated above the secondary level and participating in work, maternal, and child health seem to contribute to the reduction in child underweight. However government health and water supply facilities turn out to be ineffective.</div>

19 Jan 2017 04:10:05 GMT

Fragile Environment, Seasonality, and Maternal and Childhood Undernutrition in Bangladesh

<p>Spatial distribution of poverty in Bangladesh shows that poverty is concentrated in ecologically unfavourable areas. Recently, the issue of spatial distribution of undernutrition has emerged as a matter of concern as well, considering the growing evidence of the strong persistence of existing inequalities.Therefore, whether ecological differences have affected nutritional outcomes is becoming an important issue for research.</p><p>This paper aims to understand whether spatial and seasonal variations affect maternal and childhood undernutrition in Bangladesh. The study first tests the hypothesis whether agricultural and household incomes are same across different agro-ecological environments. It then carries out an in-depth analysis of the effect of unfavourable ecologies on maternal and child malnutrition.</p><p>In the results, panel data analysis showed that household income is not equal across agro-ecology; the fragility of the environment may thus affect the household’s ability to access food, which may have negative influence on the nutritional status of mothers and children. Coastal areas have less dependence on agriculture, particularly on cultivation which diminished over time. Per capita income has been increasing in coastal areas, led by remittance growing at 8 per cent per year against 6 per cent in other areas. <br /><br />Regression analysis shows that a household in coastal zones earns 19 per cent lower than one in favourable zones. Although farm practices are lower in unfavourable areas, the deficiency is compensated by increased non-farm incomes. The results from the Food Security Nutrition Surveillance Projects (FSNSP) data found that overall the rate of stunting and wasting prevalence were 36 per cent and 11.7 per cent respectively. Among the mothers, nearly 28 per cent suffered from chronic energy deficiencies. <br /><br />The study found that highly significant regional heterogeneity in undernutrition exists in Bangladesh; alarmingly high levels prevail in the Haor Basin and coastal belt areas. The study also found significantly higher rates of underweight and wasting prevailing in the monsoon season compared to the two harvest seasons (post-Aman and post-Aus) among children under five. Month of birth failed to show any significant association with the nutrition outcome of the children.</p><p>In order to determine the most effective strategies for accelerating reduction in undernutrition, it is important that the determinants of undernutrition are known. The findings of this study imply the importance of bringing geographical location and seasonal thinking back into the various current debates on hunger and nutrition.</p><p>&nbsp;</p>

19 Jan 2017 03:26:48 GMT

Does Agriculture Promote Diet Diversity? A Bangladesh Study

<p>It is now widely recognised that intake of sufficient dietary energy does not ensure adequate intake of protein and micronutrients necessary for leading an active and healthy life. Legumes, animal products, fruit and vegetables are important sources of minerals and micronutrients. Micronutrient deficiency causes impaired cognitive development, compromises immunity and incresses vulnerability to infectious diseases and, in severe cases, even causes mortality.&nbsp;</p><p>Recent studies show that the consumption of animal and fish products, which are dense in protein and micronutrients, has a higher correlation with nutritional status than does energy consumption. Thus, to improve the nutritional situation it is crucial that issues of dietry quality are addressed in addition to those of dietry quantity.</p><p>The rate of decline in undernutrition and malnutrition in Bangladesh has not been matching economic and agricultural progress.&nbsp; The persistence of undernutrition is considered a serious public health problem in Bangladesh.&nbsp; This paper aims to estimate the recent changes in diet diversity from the detailed food intake data estimated from the household income and expenditure surveys, and analyse the drivers of change, including the level of income and sources of income such as agriculture.</p>

17 Jan 2017 05:10:04 GMT

Are Africans willing to pay higher taxes or user fees for better health care?

<div data-canvas-width="675.2714000000002">In many parts of Africa, access to and quality of medical services remain poor. While economic growth in recent decades has fostered improved health care on the continent, weak funding, brain drain of trained professionals, and ongoing battles with diseases such as TB, HIV, diarrheal diseases, and malaria as well as recurring epidemics such as Ebola continue to put immense pressure on medical systems in many countries. Struggling medical systems confront governments and citizens with difficult choices: Needed investment in the medical sector must compete with other priorities, and increasing health spending by cutting other programs may not be a popular or even feasible solution. One alternative may be to raise taxes or user fees in order to increase available funding.</div><div data-canvas-width="675.2714000000002">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="532.7438">In its Round 6 surveys, Afrobarometer asked citizens in 36 African countries whether they would support or oppose paying higher taxes or user fees in order to increase government spending on public health care. This paper describes citizens’ responses and analyzes whether they are correlated with demographic factors, access to health services, and perceptions of health care, government performance, and official corruption.</div><div data-canvas-width="532.7438">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="532.7438"><div data-canvas-width="116.79999999999998">Key findings:</div><ul><li>on average across 36 surveyed countries, half (49%) of Africans went without medical care at least once in the year preceding the survey. Countries vary widely on this indicator, ranging from 3% in Mauritius to 78% in Liberia and 77% in Togo</li><li>among Africans who obtained medical care, four in 10 (42%) found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to do so</li><li>Africans are almost evenly divided on the question of whether to pay higher taxes or user fees in exchange for increased government spending on health care, with 42% in favour and 45% opposed. Only eight of 36 surveyed countries register majority support for such a policy (Madagascar, Mozambique, Senegal, Burkina Faso, Liberia, Mali, Namibia, and Gabon).</li><li>support for higher taxes/fees in exchange for increased health-care funding is correlated with public trust in the tax department and the president, positive performance evaluations for the president and members of Parliament, and the perception that leaders want to serve the people rather than themselves.</li><li>perceptions of official corruption and difficulties experienced in obtaining health care, on the other hand, tend to reduce support for higher taxes</li></ul></div>

17 Jan 2017 01:09:38 GMT

Africa and external actors

<div data-canvas-width="309.1166666666668">The Cape Town seminar in August 2016 brought together about 30 key scholars, policymakers, and civil society activists to assess bilateral and multilateral relations between Africa’s traditional and non-traditional actors in the post–Cold War era. <br /><br />Key issues pertaining to Africa’s relations with global actors were discussed under the following three broad themes: bilateral relations with traditional powers: the United States (US), Russia, China, France, and Britain; bilateral relations with&nbsp; non-traditional powers: India; Japan; the Nordics; and Europe and the Arab world; and multilateral relations: the United Nations (UN), the BRICS bloc (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa), the European Union (EU), the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and the World Trade Organisation (WTO). This meeting examined Africa’s relations with eight key bilateral actors or blocs and six major multilateral actors, assessing progress made in the continent’s efforts to increase its leverage in global politics through engagement with external actors.</div><div data-canvas-width="309.1166666666668">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="309.1166666666668">Policy recommendations:</div><div data-canvas-width="309.1166666666668"><ul><li>pro-Africa lobbyists in the US need to collaborate closely with legislators in the US Congress as well as Washington-based interest groups as they did during South Africa's anti-apartheid struggles in the 1980s. The Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) should also be mobilised to support these battles</li><li>the tens of thousands of highly-educated Africans in America should further help to build a viable constituency for Africa</li><li>people-to-people relations are important in Africa’s relations with Russia. Russian cultural centres could therefore contribute to building Russo-African cultural relations to improve language barriers and to strengthen business partnerships with a view to changing stereotypes on both sides</li><li>African countries should seize the potential opportunities presented by a weakened, less confident, and less cohesive post-“Brexit” Europe to redefine their relations with the European Union. This includes Africa calling for a moratorium on the economic partnership agreements while the EU completes its “divorce settlement” with Britain, and formulating substantive policy responses to issues such as Brexit</li><li>African countries should leverage China’s and India’s interest in the continent to reduce their dependence on traditional Western powers such as the US, Britain, and France, while Beijing and New Delhi should assist Africa in broadening its export base through technology transfer and knowledge-sharing. Francophone countries on the continent should reduce their political, economic, and cultural dependence on France. Furthermore, Africa must explore how it can borrow from India’s attitude towards aid and development, which is to accept aid as and when needed, and in specific ways to further its own socio-economic development based on a clear definition of its specific interests</li><li>African governments should develop clear, coordinated positions on their goals and the strategies for achieving them in fora such as the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation; the Tokyo International Conference on African Development; and in respect of other rapidly emerging economies in the “global South” such as Brazil and India</li><li>Africa remains a supplier of primary products to external actors, and should change its trade structures so that technical capacity transfer and capacity-building become more of a focus for partnerships with external actors, with local procurement and beneficiation given more prominence. Furthermore, African countries should claim their own individual and collective agency, and strengthen efforts to add value to their primary commodities; diversify their economies; and increase the competitiveness of the export of manufactured products</li><li>building on the experiences of the Economic Community of West African States Ceasefire Monitoring Group (ECOMOG) in Liberia and Sierra Leone, and the African Union missions in Burundi, Darfur, and Somalia, Africa needs to create an effective peacekeeping force; it must fund its own institutions to a greater extent in order to prevent external actors such as France and the US intervening in Africa in pursuit of their own parochial interests</li><li>African countries need to regain their influence in the UN General Assembly and Secretariat, and find a unifying issue such as UN Security Council reform, that is of benefit to the entire continent and its Southern allies</li><li>besides providing the capital to carry out infrastructure projects in Africa, the BRICS New Development Bank should be used as a knowledge development bank to help to differentiate sources of capital and to create more opportunities for investment, trade, and development</li><li>African countries and their Southern allies must continue to push for genuine transformation of the World Bank and IMF to make decision-making more equitable; African governments at the World Trade Organisation should also continue to work together and develop strategies to achieve trade deals, as well as to build coalitions and develop regional consensus on important issues such as climate change and de-industrialisation</li></ul></div>

13 Jan 2017 12:51:51 GMT

Zambia’s constitutional Groundhog Day: why national debate about constitutional reform is not going away anytime soon

<div data-canvas-width="244.56666666666666">Since independence, Zambia has had five major constitutional amendments (an average of one every 10 years), a fact that has raised concerns about the country’s constitutional foundations. The constitution has been made a campaign issue in every presidential election since Zambia’s return to multiparty politics in the 1990s. In recent years, constitutional reform has become increasingly politicised and intransigent. The latest constitutional amendment, announced in January 2016, offered Zambians provisions that had long formed part of their aspirations and demands. Why then was the 2016 constitution recently defeated in a national referendum? <br /><br />This policy briefing demonstrates how the interests of citizens have continually been placed behind the interests of Zambia’s political elite, including in the 2016 referendum.</div><div data-canvas-width="244.56666666666666">&nbsp;</div><div data-canvas-width="244.56666666666666">Recommendations:</div><div data-canvas-width="244.56666666666666"><div data-canvas-width="368.40000000000003"><ul><li>political parties should collaborate to find consensus before undertaking constitutional amendments. The African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) highlights that a country’s constitution should enjoy popular legitimacy, and major amendments and revisions should not be undertaken lightly. Zambia highlights the dangers of politicising such a foundational aspect of any democracy</li><li>referendums should not be held concurrently with national general elections. Zambia’s 2016 referendum clearly suffered due to the broader political environment, ultimately failing to secure the minimum turnout required to legally validate the final outcome</li><li>sufficient time should be allocated to sensitise citizens ahead of a national referendum. Clearly, less than six months was insufficient notice for Zambians, as demonstrated by the low turnout and significant number of rejected (spoilt) ballots</li><li>double-barrelled referendum questions should be avoided. Keep questions simple. The 2016 Zambian referendum question fails on both counts here, and the outcomes are evident</li><li>the symbols used for ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ should be easy to understand. Using an eye for ‘Yes’ and an ear for ‘No’ proved contentious and confusing in the 2016 referendum</li></ul></div></div>

13 Jan 2017 12:14:09 GMT

Utilising Electricity Access for Poverty Reduction - Full report

<p>The productive use of electricity can support sustained poverty reduction by enabling the creation and improvement of income generating activities. However, in order to realise these positive impacts, the level of electricity access must be sufficient and enabling conditions beyond the electricity supply itself must be in place.</p><p>The relationship between electricity access provision and poverty reduction has been unclear and policymakers are seeking answers to the following questions:</p><ul><li>What level of electricity access is required to enable and sustain poverty escape?</li><li>What constraints, despite increased access to electricity, mean that people are not able to use that electricity productively? How can they be removed?&nbsp;</li></ul><p>The research presented in this report has sought to explore these questions through a review of existing literature and case studies in Kenya and India which looked at the policy and regulatory regime in each country, and included stakeholder interviews and field research. The Literature Review and Case Study reports are available seperately from the Practical Action <a href="http://practicalaction.org/utilising">website</a>.</p>

12 Jan 2017 02:30:46 GMT

Steps to overcome the North–South divide in research relevant to climate change policy and practice

<p>The authors of this Nature Climate Change Perspective article argue that Northern (developed country) domination of science relevant to climate change policy and practice, and limited research led by researchers in Southern developing countries, may be hindering further development and implementation of global climate change agreements and nationally appropriate actions. They acknowledge that some efforts have been made to address the divide but argue that progress has been slow. The article illustrates the extent of the divide, reviews underlying issues and analyses their consequences for climate change policy develop-ment and implementation. The authors propose a set of practical steps that a wide range of actors should take at global, regional and national scales to address this knowledge divide, with examples of some actions already being implemented.</p>

11 Jan 2017 11:41:23 GMT

Financing Universal Access to Electricity

<p>The recent emphasis on the provision of modern energy services as an important ingredient for development has improved finance availability for the goal of Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL).</p><p>However, existing financial flows are still insufficient to meet the target of universal access of sustainable energy by 2030 and often ignore poor people, who cannot afford the service, or those renewable energy technologies that cannot offer high rates of return.</p><p>Drawing on a large dataset of official development assistance and private investment for electrification between 1990 and 2012, our research has looked at the factors that explain donor and private finance in the electricity sector of developing countries. What lessons can be taken and shared with policymakers to avoid past mistakes and target countries and technologies that have been neglected in previous efforts?</p>

11 Jan 2017 05:21:27 GMT

Pro-Poor Access to Green Electricity in Kenya

<p>Is Kenya on track to follow an electrification strategy that is green and pro-poor? What are the main challenges to following this path? The two questions guiding this study are particularly relevant in a country with exceptional renewable energy resources, but where 80 per cent of the population lacks access to electricity and 50 per cent lives in poverty.</p><p>This study looks at four particular issues relating to access to green electricity for the poor: accessibility; commercial viability for project developers; financial sustainability for the State; and affordability. We will focus on grid electricity and mini-grids. For grid-connected generation, once electricity is fed to the grid, the issues of accessibility and affordability for the poor depend on national policies determining who gets electricity and at what price, making it impossible to differentiate between green and non-green electricity.</p><p>However, our study will show whether or not on-grid renewable generation can be financially sustainable in Kenya while providing affordable fees. For off-grid electricity, targeting the poor is a matter of situating generation capacity in the right places and affordability is a matter of setting prices that allow for cost recovery without being excessively expensive for the poor.</p><p>This report can support decision-making for development and climate finance institutions, as well as private investors in Kenya seeking a pro-poor green electrification strategy. It shows how to target the poor, which electrification alternatives to use, at what price, whether or not this is commercially viable and which policies would be required to make it so.</p>

11 Jan 2017 05:12:56 GMT

What Explains the Allocation of Aid and Private Investment for Electrification?

<p>This paper aims to inform policy looking to step up investment in the electricity sector of developing countries and align it to other development goals such as universal access to energy or sustainability.</p><p>Three questions guide the analysis:</p><ul><li>How and why has private and donor finance for electrification changed across time?</li><li>What are the different motivations of private investors and donors as regards who and what gets financed?</li><li>Are sustainability and equitable access priorities for private and donor investment?&nbsp;</li></ul><p>These questions are addressed by describing finance flows during the period 1990–2010 and performing an econometric analysis to explain inter-country allocation.</p>

11 Jan 2017 03:02:42 GMT

Maximisation of Benefits for the Poor of Investments in Renewable Electricity: A Policy Tool for Project Planning

<p>Electricity improves users’ quality of life and can enable income generation when used for productive activities, hence supporting an escape from the poverty trap. Where generation comes from renewable sources, it also makes a positive contribution to low-carbon development; for many, this is a classic ‘win-win’ situation.</p><p>This report uses the evidence collected through a comprehensive literature review to develop a policy tool to maximise the poverty impact of electrification projects. It can be of use for development and climate finance institutions funding renewable energy projects in developing countries, and keen to enhance the poverty impacts of these projects.</p>

11 Jan 2017 02:56:58 GMT

Display Next Eldis Development News [eldis.org]

OECD Green Growth Newsletter

Read our latest December edition and all previous issues of the newsletter. The December issue draws your attention to the OECD work on Mainstreaming Biodiversity, highlights recent Green Growth news such as the launch of GGKP’s BIG-E Database and Georgia’s adherence to the OECD Green Growth Declaration. It also highlights the OECD’s most recent publications.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 16:18:00 GMT

Increased investment in renewable energy is key to spur sustainable growth in Emerging Asia

Despite a challenging global environment, the growth prospects of Emerging Asia (Southeast Asia, China and India) remain robust over the medium term, according to the latest edition of the OECD Development Centre’s Economic Outlook for Southeast Asia, China and India.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 09:00:00 GMT

Georgia adheres to the OECD Declaration on Green Growth

There are now 45 Adherents to the 2009 OECD Declaration on Green Growth. Georgia has joined Costa Rica, Colombia, Croatia, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Peru, Tunisia, as well as OECD members in having adhered to the Declaration.

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 15:58:00 GMT

Green Growth and Sustainable Development Forum 2016

This year's Green Growth and Sustainable Development Forum (GGSD Forum) focuses on the theme “Urban green growth, spatial planning and land-use”. Land use and spatial planning policies have implications for both the environment and the economy. Overall, consideration will be given to the potential for regional, rural and urban policy to contribute to green growth.

Wed, 09 Nov 2016 11:32:00 GMT

Urban green growth is about asking the right questions at the right time - Insights Blog

Are you a city-dweller, concerned about the challenges of urbanisation, resilience and inclusiveness? Cities and urban areas represent unrivalled concentrations of people, economic growth, commercial networks, and innovation – and have the potential to make a significant contribution to the transition towards a low-carbon world.

Fri, 04 Nov 2016 13:23:00 GMT

Webinar: Unlocking Green Growth Potential: Experiences from Colombia and Peru

Join the GGKP for a webinar on 1 November from 3:00pm - 4:30pm (Geneva time) to learn more about the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI)'s Green Growth Potential Assessment (GGPA) tool which helps countries find ways to turn risks into green growth opportunities, and the ways in which it has been applied to unlock green growth potential in Colombia and Peru.

Tue, 01 Nov 2016 15:00:00 GMT

Indonesia, open government and the SDGs

"Indonesia is well placed to be a strong advocate for open government reforms, and to link such reforms to other multi-lateral reform efforts" - OECD Insights Blog by Luiz De Mello.

Tue, 25 Oct 2016 10:50:00 GMT

Global Forum on Environment and Economic Growth

This Global Forum, held on 24-25 October 2016, aimed to shed light on the links between environment and economic growth, and the toolkits to quantify these links. It provided a platform to explore how a well-managed natural environment can contribute to economic growth and how an effective and efficient regulatory system can best be designed?

Mon, 24 Oct 2016 09:52:00 GMT

3rd OECD Green Investment Financing Forum

Building on the success of the previous Green Investment Financing Forums, the OECD held its 3rd Forum on 13-14 October 2016 in Tokyo, Japan. This year’s edition focused on Asia – a region with rapidly growing economies, developing financial markets and colossal green investment needs.

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 19:01:00 GMT

OECD Centre on Green Finance and Investment

The scale of the transition to a green, low-emissions and climate-resilient economy is enormous – it is the biggest structural adjustment ever proposed in the field of international governance. The OECD Centre will catalyse and support the transition to a green, low-emissions and climate-resilient global economy through the development of effective policies, institutions and instruments for green finance and investment.

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 17:34:00 GMT

Effective Carbon Rates - OECD Insigths Blog

On the latest OECD Insights blog post, Mr. Kurt van Dender, Head of the Tax and Environment Unit at the OECD’s Centre for Tax Policy and Administration explains the necessary requirements to deeply cut greenhouse gas emissions in order to implement the COP21 Paris Agreement.

Tue, 11 Oct 2016 14:55:00 GMT

Fighting fish crime through global co-operation - OECD Insights blog

Together countries and organisations can support efforts to fight fisheries related crimes by sharing good practices, collaborating on projects and promoting effective inter-agency co-operation at national, regional and international level.

Tue, 11 Oct 2016 14:11:00 GMT

World Green Economy Summit - Dubai, UAE

The World Green Economy Summit (WGES) is an initiative by the Dubai Electricity & Water Authority. As an institutional partner, the OECD's Matthew Griffiths will participate under the session "Clean Water to the World", in order to discuss how cross sector partnerships can help conserve and manage water in a responsible way, while using the technologies and models available to tackle regional and global water scarcity.

Wed, 05 Oct 2016 10:00:00 GMT

NAEC and the Sustainable Development Goals: The Way Forward - Insights Blog

Read the newest OECD's Insights blog based on the latest report from the New Approaches to Economic Challenges (NAEC) "Debate the Issues: New Approaches to Economic Challenges".

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 15:43:00 GMT

Carbon pricing efforts are falling short, but even modest collective action can deliver significant progress, OECD says

Current carbon prices are falling short of the levels needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions driving climate change, but even moderate price increases could have a significant impact, according to new OECD research.

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 11:00:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Sustainable Development [oecd.org]

Forthcoming release of new Trade in Value-Added (TiVA) data in 2017/2018

In Q1 2017 there will be a "light" update of the TiVA/ICIO introducing two new countries, Morocco and Peru and in Q1 2018 a "major" update will occur.

Tue, 20 Dec 2016 15:05:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in third quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade growth remains sluggish in Q3 2016

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 17:25:00 GMT

Monitoring investment and trade measures

G20 Leaders are firmly committed to open trade and investment and to resisting protectionism in all its forms. They have mandated WTO, OECD and UNCTAD – the leading international organisations in the area of international trade and investment policies – to monitor policy developments and report publicly on these commitments.

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 10:49:00 GMT

OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría welcomes the signature of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA)

“I congratulate Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau, President of the European Council Donald Tusk, and President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker on the signature of the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA). The deal comes at a crucial time when slowing trade growth and low investment are contributing to the weakness of the global economy.

Mon, 31 Oct 2016 18:36:00 GMT

Green shoots of recovery in entrepreneurship beginning to appear

The post-crisis recovery in entrepreneurial activity remains mixed across countries, but new data released today by the OECD provides tentative signs of a turning point, with trends in enterprise creation rates pointing upwards in most economies.

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 14:00:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in second quarter 2016

G20 merchandise trade in Q2 2016 shows first modest growth since early 2014

Tue, 30 Aug 2016 17:25:00 GMT

OECD Workshop on Greening Regional Trade Agreements: Opportunities and Insights from International Experience

The OECD will convene its 6th Workshop on Regional trade agreements and the environment on 10 June 2016, at the OECD Headquarters. The focus of the workshop will be on chapters of regional trade agreement (RTAs) that are concerned mainly with issues other than the environment, such as market access, investment, or government procurement, TBT, regulatory coherence or dispute settlement.

Fri, 10 Jun 2016 15:03:00 GMT

International trade statistics: trends in first quarter 2016

Slowdown in global merchandise trade accelerates in Q1 2016

Tue, 31 May 2016 08:32:00 GMT

Business brief: The ascendancy of digital trade: A new world order?

We are so used to all things digital that we can sometimes lose sight of just how enormous the phenomenon has become, and how disruptive it can be.

Thu, 26 May 2016 16:37:00 GMT

World trade: Why ministers must act

Creeping protectionism is alive and well. Last year’s monitoring report on trade for the G20 reminded us that of the nearly 1,500 trade-restrictive measures imposed by G20 countries since 2008, fewer than 400 have been removed. The stock of these barriers continues to grow, despite a pledge by the G20 to reduce protectionism.

Wed, 25 May 2016 18:48:00 GMT

Multiplication of Environmental Labelling and Information Schemes (ELIS): Implications for Environment and Trade - Environment Working Paper

This report explores potential effects of the recent rapid growth in Environmental Labelling Information Schemes (ELIS) around the world, with a focus on the implications of ELIS multiplication for environmental effectiveness and international trade.

Tue, 26 Apr 2016 11:26:00 GMT

A Review of Public Policies relating to the Use of Environmental Labelling and Information Schemes (ELIS) - Environment Working Paper

This report provides a brief review of how national government policies and guidelines apply to or regulate the use of environmental labelling and information schemes (ELIS) in selected OECD countries. The report reviews definitions relevant to environmental claims and identifies four types of potentially false or misleading environmental claims.

Sat, 23 Apr 2016 08:16:00 GMT

Global trade in fake goods worth nearly half a trillion dollars a year - OECD & EUIPO

Imports of counterfeit and pirated goods are worth nearly half a trillion dollars a year, or around 2.5% of global imports, with US, Italian and French brands the hardest hit and many of the proceeds going to organised crime, according to a new report by the OECD and the EU’s Intellectual Property Office.

Mon, 18 Apr 2016 12:00:00 GMT

Trade facilitation and integrity go hand in hand? More than you think - OECD Insights blog

Is there a role for trade liberalisation and facilitation in zeroing in on corruption and supporting integrity in trade? Yes – and a greater one than you might think.

Fri, 08 Apr 2016 13:46:00 GMT

Tougher environmental laws do not hurt export competitiveness – OECD study

Countries that implement stringent environmental policies do not lose export competitiveness when compared against countries with more moderate regulations, according to a new OECD study that examines trade in manufactured goods between advanced and emerging economies.

Thu, 10 Mar 2016 13:00:00 GMT

Display Next OECD Trade [oecd.org]

Employment

Portfolio Manager (FIN0264)

<p>Do you have experience providing project portfolio reporting and are looking for your next challenge?</p> <p>Do you have experience of planning projects in a complex, uncertain environment?</p> <p>And perhaps most important of all, do you want to be part of a movement of millions of people, all working towards one goal - an end to poverty for everyone?</p> <p><strong>If so, come and join us.</strong></p> <p>You will provide portfolio management across a number of business areas to support specific Oxfam objectives by: leading and building a team(s) of specialists; communicating with senior business managers to advice, influence and determine strategic business needs; solving complex problems and Identifying opportunities to operate and develop industry standards within Oxfam by working with external organisations and benchmarking facilities.</p> <p><strong>Essentials Skills and Experience (not comprehensive)</strong></p> <ul> <li>Experience in providing project portfolio reporting and analysis services</li> <li>practitioner (SFIA Level 6)</li> <li>Experience of planning projects</li> <li>Using industry best practice frameworks/methodologies including ITIL and PRINCE2</li> <li>Experience of running administrative and gate keeping processes</li> <li>Understanding of project management and project governance processes</li> </ul> <p>Success however will not just depend on the technical skills - in a complex and dynamic environment like Oxfam, you will need:</p> <ul> <li>Demonstrable ability to communicate with IT and non-IT staff. Capacity to constructively challenge inappropriate behaviour, to take prompt action to resolve conflict. Team player attitude and drive to deliver results.</li> </ul> <p><strong>How can you apply?</strong></p> <p><strong>For more information and how to apply visit ''jobs.oxfam.org.uk'' and type in the ''search vacancy'' browser the reference number ''FIN0264''. Alternatively, use the direct link below provided.</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Please note that Oxfam GB only accepts applications submitted via our official site.</em></strong></p>

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 12:19:12 GMT

Senior Bank Analyst (Emerging Markets in Asia)

<p>Business &amp; Finance Consulting (BFC), specializing in consulting and research activities in emerging markets, offers a challenging job opportunity for a <strong>Senior Bank Analyst</strong>, who is expected to join a team of analysts covering emerging economies in Asia.</p> <p><strong>Input:</strong> Full-time<br /><strong>Duty station:</strong> Home Office with intermittent travel throughout Asia and Pacific</p> <p><strong>Job responsibilities:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Perform financial analysis and due diligence of Asian commercial banks, including assessing corporate governance, anti-money laundering policies, and management capabilities</li> <li>Collect and research for data and information on selected banks</li> <li>Write credit reports on analysed financial institutions</li> <li>Measure corporate and lending risks (market risk, credit risk, sovereign risk, liquidity risk and other types) for the selected financial institutions</li> <li>Prepare or assess financial projections, models, and business plans</li> </ul> <p><strong>Qualifications:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Degree in finance, banking or other relevant field; MBA, CFA or comparable degree is an asset</li> <li>At least five years of experience in conducting due diligence and analysis of corporate and/or financial institutions</li> <li>Solid understanding of corporate finance and investment banking</li> <li>Knowledge of the Asian financial/banking market will be an asset</li> <li>Fluency in English</li> <li>Fluency in Russian and/or Mandarin Chinese is an asset</li> <li>Strong analytical skills</li> <li>Excellent communication, presentation, and reporting skills</li> <li>Ability to work in an international environment and flexibility to travel, including to challenging environments</li> </ul> <p>We are looking for highly motivated, proactive and result oriented professionals. Interested candidates are invited to submit a CV and a Cover Letter online at <strong>http://careers.bfconsulting.com</strong>. <br /> <br /><em>Applications are analysed on a rolling basis. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted.</em><br /><em>Thank you for your application!</em></p>

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:15:51 GMT

Senior MSME Finance and Training Consultant (Central Asia)

<p>Business &amp; Finance Consulting (BFC) (www.bfconsulting.com), a Swiss-based leading development finance consulting boutique with a global footprint in over 60 countries, invites applications for a <strong>Senior MSME Finance and Training Consultant</strong> with extensive experience in MSME finance and centralised training development and delivery to financial institutions.</p> <p><strong>Duration:</strong> Long-term/ full-time<br /><strong>Duty Station:</strong> various locations in countries of Central Asia</p> <p><strong>Job responsibilities:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Develop and implement centralised training measures for partner financial institutions&rsquo;</li> <li>Prepare high quality learning courses on MSME finance topics and integrate into training curriculum</li> <li>Contribute to the development of an internet-based knowledge sharing and exchange platform</li> <li>Apply diverse forms of learning (e-learning courses, e-textbooks, webinars, video sessions, classroom trainings, etc.) for partner financial institutions&rsquo; staff</li> <li>Provide advisory and support to the training beneficiaries with respect to training courses</li> </ul> <p><strong>Requirements:</strong></p> <ul> <li>University or postgraduate degree in Economics, Finance, Banking, or related fields</li> <li>Minimum 10 years of experience in development finance and consulting projects in countries of Central Asia</li> <li>Proven track record in delivering training material on MSME finance, both classroom and online learning courses</li> <li>Extensive experience in eLearning content development</li> <li>Experience in project management and team leadership positions is mandatory</li> <li>Excellent written and spoken skills in English and Russian</li> </ul> <p><br />We are looking for highly motivated, proactive and result oriented professionals. Interested candidates are invited to submit a CV and a cover letter online at <strong>http://careers.bfconsulting.com/</strong>.</p> <p><em>Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. Thank you for your application!</em></p>

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:13:46 GMT

Senior IT eLearning Project Manager (Central Asia)

<p>Business &amp; Finance Consulting (BFC) (www.bfconsulting.com), a Swiss-based leading development finance consulting boutique with a global footprint in over 60 countries, invites applications for a <strong>Senior IT eLearning Project Manager</strong> with extensive practice in and knowledge of online learning platforms and management systems (LMS).</p> <p><strong>Duration:</strong> Long-term/ full-time<br /><strong>Duty Station:</strong> various locations in countries of Central Asia</p> <p><strong>Job responsibilities:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Perform market assessment to identify the best solution for the knowledge sharing platform implementation</li> <li>Lead the installation, adaptation and development of a knowledge sharing platform adapted to the financial sector in countries assigned</li> <li>Manage the IT aspects of the online training content development on MSME finance topics</li> <li>Extend the platform functionally through coordination and development of additional tools and modules</li> <li>Provide training and guidance to end-users on the effective use of platform</li> </ul> <p><strong>Requirements:</strong></p> <ul> <li>University degree in Information Technology, Engineering, or related fields</li> <li>Proven track record in installation, adaptation, and development of knowledge sharing platforms</li> <li>At least 7 years of experience with knowledge sharing and exchange platforms and LMS, specifically in the finance and banking field</li> <li>Solid understanding of eLearning content development, products&rsquo; support, and LMS administration</li> <li>Experience in countries of Central Asia</li> <li>Outstanding organisational and project management skills</li> <li>Excellent written and spoken skills in English and Russian</li> </ul> <p><br />We are looking for highly motivated, proactive and result oriented professionals. Interested candidates are invited to submit a CV and a cover letter online at <strong>http://careers.bfconsulting.com/.</strong></p> <p><br /><em>Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted. Thank you for your application!</em></p>

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:11:22 GMT

Director General

<p>Location: Colombo, Sri Lanka</p> <p>Closing Date: 21 February 2017</p> <p>The International Water Management Institute is looking for a visionary Director General to lead and further develop their strong profile in water and land management.</p> <p>The ideal candidate will have an established reputation in research and development of water and natural resources management and senior management experience in research, development or training institutions, preferably in developing countries. S/he will be a strategic and visionary leader, with strong client relationship management, communication and representational skills. S/he will have strong research and development networks, demonstrated partnership building and resource mobilization skills, and in-depth knowledge of investments and trends of donors and the development sector.</p> <p>IWMI actively encourages applications from women, applicants from the developing South and previously disadvantaged groups.</p> <p>For complete information and instructions on how to apply, please see: http://oxfordhr.co.uk/job/director-general/&nbsp;</p>

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 02:10:58 GMT

Senior Researcher, the Mali project

<p><strong>Senior Researcher, The Mali Projec</strong>t</p> <p>The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) is an independent international institute whose core mission is to undertake research and activities on security, conflict and peace. Established in 1966, SIPRI provides data, analysis and recommendations, based on open sources, to policymakers, researchers, media and the interested public. SIPRI provides excellent opportunities for scientific and personal development. SIPRI is an equal opportunity employer.</p> <p>SIPRI seeks a Senior Researcher and Activity Coordinator to work as part of the team on the project, &ldquo;Building Sustainable Peace in Mali&rdquo;. Funding for this project is provided by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).</p> <p class="BulletsCxSpFirst">The main tasks of this position, working together with a partner organization in Mali, and under the guidance of the Head of Project are to:</p> <ul> <li>Support capacity-building of Malian civil society organizations to strengthen their abilities to contribute to policy development, including by engaging with the main stakeholders;</li> <li>Develop activities that address the safety of the population and security challenges in Mali;</li> <li>Develop and coordinate a framework for civil society monitoring and reporting on the safety and security challenges to improve peacebuilding policies in Mali;</li> <li>Undertake research on topics of relevance for the project, write-up and disseminate findings;</li> </ul> <p class="Bullets">The project requires fluency in written and spoken English and French. The position will involve frequent travel to Mali.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Main tasks and responsibilities</strong></p> <ul> <li>Contribute to the development of approaches for civil society monitoring and reporting of safety and security at the community level in Mali;</li> <li>Contribute to the development of training modules for civil society organizations and of capacity-building modules for the population on safety and security issues;</li> <li>Design, support (including logistics and administration) and conduct tailored workshops in Mali and Sweden and large seminars in Mali;</li> <li>Initiate and conduct research and information gathering on issues of relevance to the project;</li> <li>Prepare fact sheets, background papers and academic articles on issues of relevance to the project;</li> <li>Write / contribute to the reporting of project findings to the sponsor of the project and other project stakeholders.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Requirements</strong></p> <p>The successful candidate will have:</p> <ul> <li>A PhD in a relevant discipline, or publications to a comparable level on themes that are relevant, for a project on post-conflict policies, peace, safety and security in the Sahel region and West African countries;</li> <li>An in-depth knowledge of francophone African history, economic, political, safety and security issues, and gender-related challenges (UNSCR 1325);</li> <li>Very good knowledge and experience of working with civil society organizations on capacity building in the field of peace, safety and security;</li> <li>A previous experience in supporting civil society organizations&rsquo; &lsquo;Monitoring and Evaluation&rsquo; skills and in designing/conducting training modules for civil society actors;</li> <li>Fluency in written and spoken English and French;</li> <li>A proven track record in fund-raising, with proposal and grant writing skills;</li> <li>Previous experience in planning and organisation of high-level events in Europe and Africa;</li> <li>Ability to work independently and as part of a team.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Contract period </strong></p> <p>Starting from 1 March 2017, or as soon as possible thereafter.&nbsp; The appointment will be, initially, for a two-year period, and renewable. The post is full-time and the successful applicant will be expected to reside in Stockholm with frequent travel in Mali. The salary package will be negotiated individually.</p> <p><strong>How to apply </strong></p> <p>If interested in applying for this position, please submit a one-page letter, both in English and French, detailing your qualifications and interests in the subject area, and a full CV in English with information about your educational background, relevant experience, skills, major publications and 2 writing samples (article, book chapter or substantial piece of writing up to 8000 words). Applications should be sent via email to: mali-2017-recruitment@sipri.org. Please state &lsquo;Mali project-Senior Researcher&rsquo; as a reference in the subject line of your email with the application materials.</p> <p><strong>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>The initial closing date for applications is 30 January 2017</strong>.</p> <p>Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Please note that, only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.</p> <p>For further information about the Mali project, please contact SIPRI Mali Programme Coordinator Helen Palmgren, <a href="mailto:palmgren@sipri.org" target="_blank">palmgren@sipri.org</a>. For enquiries regarding the vacant position, contact SIPRI Mali Project Head, Dr Gregory Chauzal, <a href="mailto:gregory.chauzal@sipri.org">gregory.chauzal@sipri.org</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The trade union contact persons at SIPRI are Pieter Wezeman for ST (<a href="mailto:pwezeman@sipri.org">pwezeman@sipri.org</a>) and Annika Salisbury for Saco-S (<a href="mailto:hoghammar@sipri.org">salisbury@sipri.org</a>).</p>

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 13:36:40 GMT

Provincial Primary Health Service Officer

<h1 align="left"><span style="color: #72ad7b; font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">Provincial Primary Health Service Officer - The Ministry of Health &amp; Medical Services (MHMS) &ndash; Solomon Islands </span></h1> <h1><span style="color: #72ad7b; font-family: Calibri;">Pacific Technical Assistance Mechanism 2 (PACTAM2<span style="font-size: medium;">)</span></span></h1> <ul> <li> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">Adviser Remuneration Framework (ARF) &ndash; B2</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">12 month role</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">Based in Honiara, Solomon Islands</span></p> </li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">The role:</span></h2> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">The Ministry of Health and Medical Services (MHMS) is responsible for improving maternal and child health, reducing disease, delivering essential medicines and better health services throughout the Solomon Islands. The MHMS requires an Adviser to strengthen primary health care planning and financial management at the provincial level. You will be accountable to, and managed by the Provincial Health Directors, Guadalcanal Province and Honiara City Council. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">This role is expected to commence in April 2017 for a period of 12 months.</span></p> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">Key objectives<span style="font-size: large;">:</span></span></h2> <ul> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Strengthen financial management in the Province by supporting the provincial health director and their operational teams</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Provide ex ante financial controls for DFAT funds and provide support with budget preparation, execution and monitoring&nbsp;</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Improve primary&nbsp;health&nbsp;service&nbsp;program planning and implementation in line with MHMS&nbsp;Strategic Plan and&nbsp;Role Delineation Policy</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Build capacity in the team and thereby support the province&nbsp;to&nbsp;begin&nbsp;implementing the role delineation policy</span></p> </li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">Selection criteria<span style="font-size: medium;">:</span></span></h2> <ul> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Demonstrated&nbsp;organisational&nbsp;planning and/or&nbsp;project management skills, including financial management&nbsp;and budgeting&nbsp;skills&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Experience implementing&nbsp;primary&nbsp;health programs and/or community based health&nbsp;services&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Demonstrated experience in a developing country context, understanding of issues faced in&nbsp;provincial&nbsp;locations&nbsp;outside of the main urban centre and a preparedness to work with limited resources within a challenging environment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Demonstrated knowledge of developing countries&rsquo; government procurement&nbsp;and financial management&nbsp;procedures, policies and distribution&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">High level interpersonal, leadership, representation and communication skills and demonstrated ability to work effectively in a cross cultural team to coach and mentor people and achieve organisational priorities</span></p> </li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">The benefits: </span></h2> <ul> <li><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Remuneration in line with the ARF - B2</span></li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Mobility allowance</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Flights, medicals, and insurance</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Pre-departure briefing and in-country orientation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Ongoing assignment monitoring and support</span></p> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-size: x-large;"><strong><span style="font-family: Calibri;">Scope Global &ndash; Engaged in the present to develop the future</span></strong></span><br /> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Scope Global is a specialist project management company with people as the focus of its program delivery. We have a history of successfully managing projects in the international development and international education sectors. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">The Pacific Technical Assistance Mechanism Phase 2 (PACTAM2) is an Australian Government initiative, funded through the Australian aid program and managed by Scope Global. It places highly skilled Advisers with Partner Governments in participating Pacific Island countries to build capacity and to meet identified human resource needs. If you are interested in other PACTAM2 opportunities and would like to receive updates, please </span><a href="https://forms.nintex.com/FormHost.aspx?id=blF7NKj7lIAqgokdrtmfHSQ0eQ3GpDtpv20ew1lLnrHeq8IRrIOQAog_f9CsaP_62aYHIlaVCZN8vZKHmsH4fPk48hXoRK3Pv0sQ8DI1QlPBTSRR9ZETPea5RUEf4jgD&amp;TZOffset=-570&amp;TZStdOffset=570&amp;HasDST=true"><span style="color: #0000ff; font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">register your interest</span></a><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">. </span></p> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">To apply:</span></h2> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Scope Global recruitment operates under equal employment opportunity principles and laws. We encourage appropriately qualified and experienced people to apply regardless of age, sex, ethnicity, physical ability or beliefs.</span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">&nbsp; </span></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Applications will</span></span></strong><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">only be accepted via our online application system</span></span></strong><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">. For more detailed information on the position and to apply online, please visit </span><a href="http://www.scopeglobal.com/pactam2/"><span style="color: #0000ff; font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">http://www.scopeglobal.com/pactam2/</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Applications close </span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">midnight ACST Sunday 29</span><sup><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: small;">th</span></sup><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;"> January</span></span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">. No late applications will be accepted.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">For more information contact a member of our team at </span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">recruitment.PACTAM2@scopeglobal.com</span></p>

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 23:35:34 GMT

Health Infrastructure Adviser

<h1 align="left"><span style="color: #72ad7b; font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">Health Infrastructure Adviser &ndash; Ministry of Health and Medical Services (MHMS) &ndash; Solomon Islands </span></h1> <h1><span style="color: #72ad7b; font-family: Calibri;">Pacific Technical Assistance Mechanism 2 (PACTAM2<span style="font-size: large;">)</span></span></h1> <ul> <li> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">Adviser Remuneration Framework (ARF) &ndash; C3</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">12 month role</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: medium;">Based in Honiara, Solomon Islands</span></p> </li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">The role:</span></h2> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">The Ministry of Health and Medical Services (MHMS) is responsible for delivering health care throughout the Solomon Islands, functioning infrastructure is key to the effective provision of public, primary and curative health services. The MHMS requires an Adviser to improve infrastructure project implementation and support health infrastructure projects. You will be accountable to, and managed by the Under Secretary Admin and Finance.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">This role is expected to commence in April 2017 for a period of 12 months.</span></p> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">Key objectives<span style="font-size: medium;">:</span></span></h2> <ul> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Work with MHMS to improve its ability to deliver health infrastructure projects through implementation of the MHMS Annual Works Program, including the 476 development budget</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Build the capacity of the MHMS Infrastructure and Asset Unit to effectively manage the MHMS&rsquo;s Works Program infrastructure projects and contracts, including planning, budgeting, payment processing, project supervision and contract administration systems and processes</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Strengthen MHMS Procurement Unit capacity to reform infrastructure procurement processes</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Ensure planning, design, construction and maintenance of MHMS infrastructure projects is consistent with MHMS Role Delineation Policy requirements</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Ensure that contracted architectural and project management services are well managed, effective and provide value for money</span></p> </li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">Selection criteria:</span></h2> <ul> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Degree or post graduate qualifications in Engineering, Architecture or Project Management</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Previous experience building institutional and individual capacity in infrastructure project and asset management, preferably in a developing country context</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Experience overseeing the successful implementation of capital works programs</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">High level interpersonal, leadership, representation and communication skills</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Commitment to team work, coaching and mentoring other people</span></p> </li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">The benefits:</span></h2> <ul> <li><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Remuneration in line with the ARF - C3</span></li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Mobility allowance</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Flights, medicals, and insurance</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Pre-departure briefing and in-country orientation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style="font-size: small;">Ongoing assignment monitoring and support</span></p> </li> </ul> <p><span style="font-size: x-large;"><strong><span style="font-family: Calibri;">Scope Global &ndash; Engaged in the present to develop the future</span></strong></span><br /> <span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Scope Global is a specialist project management company with people as the focus of its program delivery. We have a history of successfully managing projects in the international development and international education sectors. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">The Pacific Technical Assistance Mechanism Phase 2 (PACTAM2) is an Australian Government initiative, funded through the Australian aid program and managed by Scope Global. It places highly skilled Advisers with Partner Governments in participating Pacific Island countries to build capacity and to meet identified human resource needs. If you are interested in other PACTAM2 opportunities and would like to receive updates, please </span><a href="https://forms.nintex.com/FormHost.aspx?id=blF7NKj7lIAqgokdrtmfHSQ0eQ3GpDtpv20ew1lLnrHeq8IRrIOQAog_f9CsaP_62aYHIlaVCZN8vZKHmsH4fPk48hXoRK3Pv0sQ8DI1QlPBTSRR9ZETPea5RUEf4jgD&amp;TZOffset=-570&amp;TZStdOffset=570&amp;HasDST=true"><span style="color: #0000ff; font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">register your interest</span></a><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">. </span></p> <h2><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: x-large;">To apply:</span></h2> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Scope Global recruitment operates under equal employment opportunity principles and laws. We encourage appropriately qualified and experienced people to apply regardless of age, sex, ethnicity, physical ability or beliefs.</span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">&nbsp; </span></p> <p><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Applications will</span></span></strong><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">only be accepted via our online application system</span></span></strong><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">. For more detailed information on the position and to apply online, please visit </span><a href="http://www.scopeglobal.com/pactam2/"><span style="color: #0000ff; font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">http://www.scopeglobal.com/pactam2/</span></a></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">Applications close </span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">midnight ACST Sunday 29</span><sup><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: small;">th</span></sup><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;"> January</span></span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">. No late applications will be accepted.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">For more information contact a member of our team at </span><span style="font-family: Calibri; font-size: medium;">recruitment.PACTAM2@scopeglobal.com</span></p>

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 23:32:21 GMT

Director of Health Programs

<p align="center"><strong>Position</strong><strong>Announcement:</strong></p> <p align="center"><strong>Director of Health Programs </strong></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Position:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Director</strong><strong>of Health Programs </strong></p> <p><strong>Name</strong><strong>of</strong><strong>organization:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Yale-China</strong><strong>Association</strong><strong>Website:&nbsp; </strong><a href="http://www.yalechina.org/"><strong>www.yalechina.org</strong></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>About</strong><strong>the</strong><strong>Yale-China</strong><strong>Association:</strong></p> <p>The Yale-China Association is one of the foremost institutions focused on building grassroots relations with China in the areas of education, health, public service, and the arts. Founded in 1901, the Association has a 115-year history of working in China, and offices in New Haven and Hong Kong. Closely affiliated with the Yale University community, Yale-China is a separately incorporated and administered non-profit organization.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Position</strong><strong>Description</strong>:</p> <p>The Yale-China Association seeks a Director of Health Programs based at its headquarters in New Haven, Connecticut. Reporting to the executive director, the Director of Health Programs works closely with the Health Advisory Committee (comprised of trustees and others with expertise in medicine, nursing, public health and international health exchanges) to provide strategic leadership and program execution for Yale-China&rsquo;s health program work.</p> <p><strong>Essential</strong><strong>Duties:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Provide leadership and accountability for all health programs of the Yale-China Association;</li> <li>Align the work of the health program to support the mission and work of the Yale-China Association;</li> <li>Develop new programs, initiatives and funding sources for the health program, including exchange programs for Chinese and American scholars, students, and faculty;</li> <li>Manage and supervise health program staff to ensure the effective operations of the program, including recruitment and selection, orientation and training, and program execution;</li> <li>Travel to China 2-4 times a year to meet with partners, observe program work, and determine new program focus;</li> <li>Establish strong networks in the health sector in China and the U.S.;</li> <li>Serve as the organization&rsquo;s authority on relevant developments in health&ndash;related topics in China;</li> <li>Participate in and host Yale-China events relevant to the work;</li> <li>Serve as staff representative of the Health Advisory Committee;</li> <li>Work closely with the director of finance and operations and other staff to prepare financial materials and documentation for grants, contracts and budgets related to the health program;</li> <li>Provide mentorship to Chinese visiting scholars and students as needed.</li> <li>This is a non-academic/non-tenured senior non-profit management position.</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Education</strong><strong>and Experience:</strong></p> <p>Seven years of related work experience, preferably in areas related to health, public health, nursing or medicine in China and experience in the non-profit field of academic and health exchanges. &nbsp;Strong preference for Ph.D. or equivalent in public health, nursing or medicine.</p> <p><strong>Skills</strong><strong>and</strong><strong>Abilities:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Experience in the area of international health program development and management;</li> <li>Good understanding of key issues in public health, global health, and the health systems of China;</li> <li>Strong interpersonal and intercultural skills, including the ability to work well in Chinese settings and to support and inspire individuals to work in China;</li> <li>Excellent judgment and the ability to work both independently and as a member of a team;</li> <li>Excellent oral and written English and Mandarin Chinese;</li> <li>A strong sense of professional ethics and principles;</li> <li>Excellent organizational skills, ability to pay keen attention to detail; ability to handle multiple tasks, office procedures, demands and deadlines;</li> <li>Excellent computer skills with proficiency in MS Office and ability to work remotely;</li> <li>Outstanding written and verbal communication skills;</li> <li>Legally authorized to work in the United States; and</li> </ul> <p><strong>Start</strong><strong>date:</strong><strong>&nbsp; </strong><strong>A</strong>pplications will be reviewed on a rolling basis with the goal of hiring by late winter/early spring.</p> <p>Please send cover letter and resume to Jonathan Green&nbsp;<a href="mailto:jonathan.green@yale.edu">jonathan.green@yale.edu</a></p>

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 18:23:34 GMT

Monitoring & Evaluation Specialst, P3, Ghana

<h2>Monitoring &amp; Evaluation Specialist, P-3, Accra, Ghana, #63181</h2> <p><span style="float: right;"><a class="apply-link button" href="https://secure.dc7.pageuppeople.com/apply/671/gateway/?c=apply&amp;lJobID=502300&amp;lJobSourceTypeID=796&amp;sLanguage=en-us">Apply now</a></span> <strong>Job no:</strong> <span class="job-externalJobNo">502300</span><br /><strong>Work type:</strong> <span class="work-type fixed-term-staff">Fixed Term Staff</span><br /><strong>Location:</strong> <span class="location">Ghana</span><br /><strong>Categories:</strong> <span class="categories">Monitoring and Evaluation, P-3</span></p> <div id="job-details"> <p>If you are a committed, creative professional and are passionate about making a lasting difference for children, the world's leading children's rights organization would like to hear from you.</p> <p><br />For 70 years, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has been working on the ground in 190 countries and territories to promote children's survival, protection and development. The world's largest provider of vaccines for developing countries, UNICEF supports child health and nutrition, good water and sanitation, quality basic education for all boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence, exploitation, and AIDS. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.</p> <p><br /><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Purpose of the Position</strong></span></p> <p>Within the context of UNICEF Accra, Ghana's country office (CO), the incumbent of the post will ensure&nbsp;that the CO has useful, valid and reliable information on:</p> <ul> <li>the situation of children's and women's rights;</li> <li>the performance of UNICEF-supported programmes including their relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, and sustainability, and in emergency contexts, their coverage, coordination and coherence.</li> </ul> <p>The incumbent of the post will lead UNICEF Ghana's M&amp;E unit and work with the UN country team to support UNCT goals for delivering valid and reliable information on the attainment of the MDGs and other goals, and on the performance of UN-supported programmes. The incumbent of the post will also assist with the establishment of monitoring and evaluation tools which enhance partnership between the UNCT, government and other key players to collectively track progress on MDGs and other international commitment for children. The incumbent will also assist with the development of national capacities for monitoring, evaluation and research, with special attention to the interest, concern and participation of government, community, and civil society stakeholders.</p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Key Accountabilities, Duties, &amp; Tasks<br /></strong></span><br /><strong>1. Integrated Monitoring, Evaluation, &amp; Research<br /></strong><br /><em>Ensure that the Country Office and national partners use a well-prioritised and realistic plan of research, monitoring and evaluation activities that will provide the most relevant and strategic information to manage the Country Programme, including tracking and assessing UNICEF's distinct contribution.</em></p> <ul> <li>Make professional contributions to and provide technical assistance for the planning and establishing the major research, monitoring and evaluation objectives, priorities, and activities in UNICEF's multi-year and annual IMEPs, in consultation with child-rights and implementing partners.</li> <li>Likewise, support the development of UNDAF M&amp;E Plans from a sound results-based programming process.</li> <li>Identify the M&amp;E objectives, priorities, and activities required for effective CO and partner Emergency Preparedness and Response Plans.</li> <li>In humanitarian response situations, within the first month, draft and recommend a simple one-month data-collection plan to cover key data gaps as required for the initial emergency response, working in close collaboration with the humanitarian clusters partners.</li> <li>After the initial humanitarian response, support management of the medium-term response with a revised IMEP</li> </ul> <p><strong>2. Situation Monitoring and Assessment<br /></strong><br /><em>Ensure that the Country Office and national partners have timely and accurate measurement of change in conditions in the country or region, including monitoring of socio-economic trends and the country's wider policy, economic or institutional context, to facilitate planning and to draw conclusions about the impact of programmes or policies.</em></p> <ul> <li>In coordination with other stakeholders, support the collection of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) and other key social development indicators (through MICS or other surveys) to improve national planning.</li> <li>Support partners in the establishment and management of national statistical databases (e.g., DevInfo), ensuring that key indicators are readily accessible by key stakeholders. Potential uses include the Situation Analysis, Common Country Assessment, Early Warning Monitoring Systems, and Mid-Term Reviews.</li> <li>Develop a collectively Situation Monitoring and Assessment system owned by all key partners which supports the preparation of country level statistical and analytic reports on the status of children's and women's rights issues; and which allow, when opportunities emerge to influence developmental and social policies. To include technical support to global reporting obligations including national reports on progress toward the MDGs, and toward CRC and CEDAW fulfilment.</li> <li>In humanitarian response situations, provide professional support for one or more rapid assessments (inter-agency or independently if necessary) to be carried out within the first 48-72 hours, working in close collaboration with the humanitarian partners.</li> </ul> <p><strong>3. Programme Performance Monitoring</strong></p> <p><em>Ensure that the Country Office has quality information to assess progress towards expected results established in annual work plans.</em></p> <ul> <li>Provide technical support to ensure that a set of programme performance indicators are identified and adjusted as necessary, with inputs of all concerned partners in the context of the multi-year and annual IMEPs, the Annual Management Plan and Annual Work Plans, as outlined in the Programme Policy and Procedures Manual).</li> <li>Coordinate with partners to ensure that monitoring systems are properly designed, and that data collection and analysis from field visits are coordinated and standardised across programmes to feed into to programme performance monitoring, with special attention to humanitarian response.</li> <li>Drawing on monitoring and analysis of key program performance and management indicators, provide professional input to management reports, including relevant sections of the annual reports.</li> </ul> <p><strong>4. Evaluation</strong></p> <p><em>Ensure that UNICEF-supported evaluations are designed and implemented to established UN quality standards, and the results are disseminated in a timely fashion to stakeholders in order to improve programme performance and contribute to wider learning.</em></p> <ul> <li>Technically support programme partners to formulate Terms of Reference and evaluation designs of high quality, when relevant drawing on the know-how of knowledge institutions, in compliance with the organization's programme evaluation policies and guidelines.</li> <li>Monitor and ensure the quality of the field work and data management during the implementation phase, and the quality of the analysis and ease of understanding during the report writing phase.</li> <li>Disseminate evaluation findings and recommendations to the intended audiences in user-friendly methods. In particular, to ensure that effective participatory feedback is provided to community and civil society stakeholders.</li> <li>Monitor and ensure that a management response to the findings and recommendations of the evaluation is completed, recorded, and followed up for implementation.</li> <li>Most specifically, ensure that evaluation recommendations are submitted to the Country Management Team and follow-up actions recorded in CMT minutes. Submit electronic copies of all evaluations to NYHQ via the Evaluation Data Base web portal, with full accompanying documentation.</li> </ul> <p><strong>5. Monitoring &amp; Evaluation Capacity Building</strong></p> <p><em>Ensure that the monitoring and evaluation capacities of Country Office staff and national partners </em><em>government and civil society &ndash; are strengthened enabling them to increasingly engage in and lead monitoring and evaluation processes.</em></p> <ul> <li>Promote awareness and understanding of the shared responsibility of M&amp; E function among all staff members through communication, training, learning and development activities organization-wide.&nbsp;</li> <li>In close collaboration with partners, ensure that an M&amp;E capacity building strategy for UNICEF/UN staff national partners and institutions exists in the context of the IMEP, or UNDAF M&amp;E plan. Pay particular attention so the capacity needs of national partners such as professional evaluation associations will be strengthened by involvement in evaluation processes and possibly through specific capacity building initiatives.</li> <li>Collaborate to implement capacity building strategies as a joint commitment with other developmental partners. Utilize a range of appropriate skills building strategies including self-learning, seminars and workshops and practical experience in order that UNICEF and UN staff have the basic knowledge and skills in understanding and applying new M&amp;E policies, tools, and methods to fulfil their responsibilities. Similarly, design and implement strategies suited to the skills needs of national partners.</li> <li>Actively seek partnerships with knowledge institutions for the identification of capacity gaps and development of strategies to address them.</li> </ul> <p><strong>6. Coordination and Networking</strong></p> <p><em>Ensure that the UNICEF office is effectively linked to wider UNICEF M&amp;E developments in a way that both contributes to and benefits from organizational learning on effective M&amp;E management.</em></p> <ul> <li>Collaborate with Regional M&amp;E Advisers and HQ Evaluation Office for overall coordination of priority research, monitoring and evaluation activities, especially those of regional scope requiring the coordinated effort of multiple countries.</li> <li>Partner with the Regional Monitoring and Evaluation Adviser to ensure that current and accurate M&amp;E data and results are included in regional reports, multi-country studies, and knowledge sharing networks.</li> <li>Undertake lessons-learned reviews on successful and unsuccessful M&amp;E practices and experience at the national level, and ensure they are shared as appropriate. Similarly, pay attention to M&amp;E knowledge networks to identify innovations and lessons learned that may be relevant for the CO and partners to improve their M&amp;E function.</li> </ul> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Qualifications of Successful Candidate<br /></strong></span></p> <ul> <li>An advanced university degree (Master's) in Social Sciences, Demography, Development, Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation, Statistics or related field(s) is required.*</li> <li>A minimum of five (5) years of relevant experience in designing, managing and leading, programme monitoring and evaluation is required.</li> <li>Previous knowledge and experience in data analysis and dissemination, evaluation design and quality assurance, supporting national M&amp;E systems, and use of quantitative/qualitative/mixed methods is highly desirable.</li> <li>Familiarity of emerging international good practice in M&amp;E partnerships is desirable.</li> <li>Knowledge of UNICEF strategic framework for partnerships and collaborative relationships is desirable.</li> <li>Previous work experience in an emergency duty station and/or humanitarian context is considered an asset.</li> <li>Fluency in English (written &amp; verbal) is required. Knowledge of an additional UN Language (Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian, Spanish) is considered an asset.</li> </ul> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Competencies of Successful Candidate<br /></strong></span><br /><strong>Core Values<br /></strong></p> <ul> <li>Commitment</li> <li>Diversity and Inclusion</li> <li>Integrity</li> </ul> <p><strong>Core competencies</strong></p> <ul> <li>Communication (Level 2)</li> <li>Working with People (Level 2)</li> <li>Drive for Result (Level 2)&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p><strong>Functional Competencies<br /></strong></p> <ul> <li>Leading and Supervising (Level 2)</li> <li>Formulating Strategies and Concepts (Level 2)</li> <li>Analyzing (Level 2)</li> <li>Applying Technical Expertise (Level 2)</li> <li>Planning and Organizing (Level 3)</li> </ul> </div> <p><strong>Advertised:</strong> <span class="open-date">06 Jan 2017 </span>GMT Standard Time<br /><strong>Applications close:</strong> <span class="close-date">30 Jan 2017 </span>GMT Standard Time</p>

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 09:09:16 GMT

Finance Delegate (m/f) Manila, Philippines

<p>German Red Cross (GRC) is part of a worldwide community assisting victims of conflicts and disasters and people affected by social or health related crises. The Red Cross / Red Crescent Movement provides vulnerable people with assistance without discrimination as to nationality, race, religious beliefs, class or political opinions and adheres to the seven Fundamental Principles of the Movement: Humanity, Impartiality, Neutrality, Independence, Voluntary Service, Unity and Universality. The German Red Cross assists in disaster response, rehabilitation and capacity building projects internationally on appeals of their sister organisations within the Movement.<br /><br />The German Red Cross is carrying out relief, recovery and long-term development projects with the Philippine Red Cross (PRC). The current project portfolio is diverse and includes a comprehensive integrated recovery programme as well as several long-term DRR interventions funded by DIPECHO, DEVCO, FFO, BMZ.&nbsp; GRC is currently operational in 10 provinces in Luzon and in the Visayas regions.<br />To support our projects in the Philippines, we are looking for a Finance Delegate with strong experience in working in support of a larger relief / recovery/ development operation with multiple donor funded projects. <br /><br />GRC is currently seeking a <strong>Finance Delegate</strong> with broad experience in large relief/ recovery/ development cooperation and multiple donor funded projects. <br /><br /><strong>Duration:</strong> 7 months, starting April 2017<br /><strong>Location:</strong> Manila, Philippines with travel to project locations in Philippines <br /><br /><strong>Responsibilities and tasks:</strong><br />The Finance Delegate is working in close cooperation with the GRC Head of Office, the Philippine Red Cross and the Project Delegates deployed by the German Red Cross.<br /><br />The overall responsibility is securing the financial management (including prevention of fraud and corruption) of the projects in the respective area, especially of donor funded projects (FFO, BMZ and EU) and to support the delegation in administrative &amp; logistics tasks. The Finance Delegate will ensure that GRC financial, administrative and standard operation procedures are applied and maintained and where necessary strengthened and improved.<br /><br /><strong>Main tasks:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Strengthening of the established financial system in line with GRC rules as well as national partner and donor requirements</li> <li>Overall financial administration</li> <li>Safeguarding of financial procedures and regulations</li> <li>Financial reporting according to GRC and donor standards</li> <li>Managing, mentoring and training of local staff</li> <li>Strengthen the capacity of PRC-GRC local finance staff through skill development, including financial management and monitoring to ultimately assume ownership and responsibility of the financial management of the GRC projects in the Philippines after the end of your mission</li> <li>Close cooperation and coordination with the finance officer in GRC NHQ</li> <li>Administrative tasks</li> <li>Support to logistic and procurement procedures</li> </ul> <p><strong>Required Skills:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Profound experiences in bookkeeping/accounting and financial management, including administrative issues and financial reporting of international development cooperation projects (minimum of 3 years work experience)</li> <li>Ability to manage and control cash flow in multiple projects</li> <li>Experience in managing funds provided by the German Government (BMZ, FFO) and European donors (ECHO, DEVCO)</li> <li>Strong ability to guide and train international and local staff (e.g. financial management)</li> <li>Experience in logistics, especially procurement</li> <li>Excellent computer skills in MS office and common accounting software</li> <li>Good interpersonal skills, the ability to communicate clearly and effectively and build relationships at all levels, taking into account cultural and language differences.</li> <li>Oral and written fluency in English, knowledge of German would be an asset</li> <li>Readiness to work in a challenging environment in an international team</li> <li>Knowledge of Red Cross and Crecent principles and readiness to adhere to them</li> </ul> <p>GRC offers you a compensation package according to the collective employment agreement of the GRC as well as an expatriation allowance during your mission. Depending on the post specific situation we either provide you with an accommodation or a personal allowance to cover your accommodation. In addition to a full insurance package (health insurance for residence abroad, private accident insurance, private liability insurance, luggage insurance) GRC is as well covering a home flight within a 12-month period of assignment and medical check-ups before and after your mission. Before your assignment you will benefit from a comprehensive training package and receive briefings and coaching prior as well as during and after your mission. <br /><br /><strong>Kindly apply by submitting your application by using the GRC online application system <a href="https://drkhrnet.drk.de/Home">DRK HRnet</a> until 05.02.2017.</strong><br /><br />Please indicate <strong>Ref. No. 2017-003</strong> with your application.<br /><br />Further information on our recruiting procedure can be found on our <a href="http://www.drk.de/en/be-involved/international-vacancies/">homepage.</a></p>

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 11:48:12 GMT

Regional Manager/Programmes – Middle East & North Africa (MENA) Region (INT3133)

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>About the Role</strong></span></p> <p><span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span>This role is part of a regional structure (platform) delivering support to and contributing to enhancing program design and implementation in the 11 countries where it is currently present, through both its Amman and Tunis country offices. Oxfam is looking for two Regional Managers to be based in either of these geographic locations. The candidates&rsquo; eligibility to work in one or the other may determine the final location of these positions.&nbsp; One Regional Manager will act as the deputy Regional Director for MENA (called &lsquo;Regional Manager), whilst the Regional Manager/Programmes&rsquo; primary function will be to lead and drive programming in the region.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>To contribute to defining the MENA regional strategy, operational model to deliver it, effective management of country offices and regional programmes ensuring continued improvement in quality and impact of programmes, and effective financial and human resource management in line with Oxfam &nbsp;Policy.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>About the Region (Shaping a stronger Oxfam for people living in poverty in MENA</strong></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Oxfam is undergoing a significant transformation worldwide to reflect and adapt to our fast changing world. We need creative and agile leaders who can enable us achieve our strategic vision and at the same time enable us to develop and deliver programmes whilst we embrace the change.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>In MENA, Oxfam works in development, humanitarian, and campaigning, with a large part of the current transformation focused on becoming a major influencing &amp; advocacy, knowledge-for-impact global reach organisation.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>Additional Information&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span><strong>Contract Length</strong>:&nbsp;2 years</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span><strong>Benefits</strong>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>It is Oxfam&rsquo;s policy to hire at the minimum to middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>The candidates&rsquo; eligibility to work in Tunis may determine the final location of this position.</span></p> </div> </div>

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 10:01:17 GMT

Personal Assistant /Administration to the OI Regional Director, Middle East & North Africa Region (INT3121)

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><strong><span>About the Role</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Oxfam is looking for a combined Personal Assistant to the OI MENA Regional Director and Administration role (PA/Administration), to be based in Amman.&nbsp;</span><span>To provide high-level PA and administration support to the Regional Director (RD) and the Regional Business Support &amp; Finance Manager; and undertake specific projects and to manage and develop delegated administrative functions in order to ensure the effective operation of the RD&rsquo;s office.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p align="center"><span><strong>About the Region (Shaping a stronger Oxfam for people living in poverty in MENA).</strong></span></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Oxfam is undergoing a significant transformation worldwide to reflect and adapt to our fast changing world. We need creative and agile leaders who can enable us achieve our strategic vision and at the same time enable us&nbsp; develop and deliver programmes whilst we embrace the change.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>In MENA, Oxfam works in development, humanitarian, and campaigning, with a large part of the current transformation focused on becoming a major influencing &amp; advocacy, knowledge-for-impact global reach organisation.&nbsp;</span><span>Oxfam will set up a MENA regional platform delivering support and contributing to enhancing program design and implementation in the 11 countries where it is currently present.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>Additional Information</strong></span></p> <p><span><strong>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p><span><strong>Contract Length</strong>:&nbsp;2 years</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Benefits</strong>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>It is Oxfam&rsquo;s policy to hire at the minimum to middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div>

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 09:15:12 GMT

Regional Manager – Middle East & North Africa (MENA) Region (INT3120)

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><strong><span>About the Role</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>This role is part of a new regional structure (platform) delivering support to and contributing to enhancing program design and implementation in the 11 countries where it is currently present, through both its Amman and Tunis country offices. Oxfam is looking for two Regional Managers to be based in either of these geographic locations. The candidates&rsquo; eligibility to work in one or the other may determine the final location of these positions.&nbsp; One Regional Manager will act as the deputy Regional Director for MENA (called &lsquo;Regional Manager) and have line management over several Country Directors (to be decided), whilst the Regional Manager/Programmes&rsquo; primary function will be to lead and drive programming in the region.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>To contribute to defining the MENA regional strategy, operational model to deliver it, effective management of country offices and regional programmes ensuring continued improvement in quality and impact of programmes, and effective financial and human resource management in line with Oxfam &nbsp;Policy.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>To ensure country offices in MENA are led and managed to an excellent level by country directors and CMT&rsquo;s with an appropriate level of support from country governance structures. To ensure the country office assets of staff, partner and donor relationships, funds, equipment, and management are developed, managed and preserved through the use of Oxfam and industry standards and norms, ensuring the delivery of excellence in programming towards Oxfam&rsquo;s Goals.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p align="center"><span><strong>About the Region (Shaping a stronger Oxfam for people living in poverty in MENA).</strong></span></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Oxfam is undergoing a significant transformation worldwide to reflect and adapt to our fast changing world. We need creative and agile leaders who can enable us achieve our strategic vision and at the same time enable us to develop and deliver programmes whilst we embrace the change.</span></p> <p><span>In MENA, Oxfam works in development, humanitarian, and campaigning, with a large part of the current transformation focused on becoming a major influencing &amp; advocacy, knowledge-for-impact global reach organisation.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>&nbsp;</span></p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>Additional Information&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Contract Length</strong><span>:&nbsp;2 years</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong><span>Benefits</span></strong><span>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>It is Oxfam&rsquo;s policy to hire at the minimum to middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>The candidates&rsquo; eligibility to work in Amman may determine the final location of this position.</span></p> </div> </div>

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 09:14:21 GMT

Regional Human Resources Business Partner – Middle East & North Africa (MENA) Region (INT3119)

<div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><strong><span>About the Role</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>To provide strategic input and support to the Regional Director and Regional Leadership Team as well as to the Country Director and Country HR Managers in order to achieve the Regional strategy and Oxfam&rsquo;s mission.&nbsp;</span><span>Ensures that all staffing issues are managed in line with Oxfam policies and procedures and facilitates effective implementation by managers, or working alongside managers, to support delivery.</span></p> <p><span>As a key member of the Regional Platform and the global HR leadership team, this person will lead and facilitate the development of a highly effective and strategic HR function in the region to ensure the organization has the right structure, culture and talent needed to deliver on its objectives across the region (including countries). This person will be the trusted partner of the Regional Director and the Regional Platform on all people related matters. He/she will support and enable countries in the region to manage and develop their people as well as ensuring that quality standards in Human Resources are met across the region. He/she will be accountable for the implementation strategy of the Global HR People Strategy within the region.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><strong><span>About the Region (Shaping a stronger Oxfam for people living in poverty).</span></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>Oxfam is undergoing a significant transformation worldwide to reflect and adapt to our fast changing world. We need creative and agile leaders who can enable us achieve our strategic vision and at the same time enable us &nbsp;develop and deliver programmes whilst we embrace the change. &nbsp;In MENA, Oxfam works in development, humanitarian, and campaigning, with a large part of the current transformation focused&nbsp; on becoming a major influencing &amp; advocacy, knowledge-for-impact global reach organisation. &nbsp;</span></p> <p><span>Oxfam will set up a MENA regional platform delivering support to and contributing to enhancing program design and implementation in the 11 countries where it is currently present. Oxfam is looking for a Regional HR Business Partner to be based in its country-office in Amman.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> <div class="earcu_posdescription"> <div class="earcu_posdescriptionnote"> <p><span><strong>Additional Information&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Contract Length</strong>:&nbsp;2 years</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span><strong>Benefits</strong>: Oxfam offers staff a comprehensive benefits package including annual leave entitlements, sick pay provision, medical cover plus opportunities for learning and development.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>It is Oxfam&rsquo;s policy to hire at the minimum to middle of the band, depending upon the skills and experiences of the strongest candidate.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span>The candidates&rsquo; eligibility to work in Amman may determine the final location of this position.</span></p> </div> </div>

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 09:13:28 GMT

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